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PING Rolls Out Complete New G15 and i15 Lines

Aug. 4, 2009     By     Comments (44)

Come check out the latest from PING, a blend of cutting-edge technology and time-tested design.

Bag DropJust in time for their 50th aniversary, PING is introducing two completely new lines of clubs: the G15 and i15. The largest product launch in PING history includes something for every level of player, from the beginner to the advanced player. In today's Bag Drop, we're taking a look at the Solheim family's latest innovations.

PING is introducing not one but two completely new lines of clubs, with new drivers, fairway metals, hybrids, and irons in each. PING is also introducing a new putter line and adding a few models to existing lines, but given the massive introduction of eight new products, this Bag Drop won't get around to talking about the new flatsticks.

PING has long used the "G" series to denote their game-improvement line for the higher handicapper with added forgiveness, and kept their "i" series for the more skilled player looking to push their game even further with enhanced workability and shot control. This continues with the G15 and i15 lines, each of which will pair with an expansion to the comprehensive fitting system PING has always offered. Along with the famous PING Dot System, they have added six PING grip sizes, more shaft flex and material options, and more loft and bias combinations than ever before.

John K. Solheim says that "custom fitting continues to grow in importance for golfers wanting to improve their games." He added that "what we're learning from our nFlight Fitting Software and other research is being incorporated into our development process. It's leading us in some very interesting and exciting directions as we look for ways to help lower scores and make the game more enjoyable."

The new clubs will be available at golf retailers worldwide in mid-August. Now, let's take a look at the new PING sticks that everyone has been waiting for.

PING's Newest Irons

Let's begin with the irons. After all, you use them on virtually every hole and there are more of them in your bag than any other type of club.

The G15 Irons
Ping G15 IronPING's new G15s are designed to launch the ball high and long. Wider soles and improved weighting allows these irons to launch the ball high, while strong lofts add a little distance. The new irons feature a wider sole to help get the ball in the air, and a new Custom Tuning Port (CTP). The CTP creates a higher moment of inertia, while a thinner face expands the perimeter weighting to the toe of the club. This extra toe weighting helps to square the face and avoid those pesky pushes and slices.

Ping G15 Floating CTP
PING's G15 irons feature a "custom tuning port" (CTP) to help with forgiveness and launch angle.

The irons are available in 3-9 irons, PW, UW, SW, and LW. Available shafts are the PING-designed AWT steel (Soft R, R, S and X flexes) and TFC 149i graphite shaft (L, Soft R, R and S flexes). MSRP is $107.50 per club for steel, and $135 per club for graphite.

PING G15 Iron Set
PING's new G15 irons are available in a standard 3-PW with U, S, and L wedges available too.

The i15 Irons
Ping i15 IronThough the i-series irons were designed with the better player in mind, several of the features from the G15 make their way into a sleeker, more workable iron in the i15. The i15 line features more compact heads and thinner lines to give these better players more workability and shot control.

Designed as a progressive set, the long irons are slightly longer heel to toe for a touch of added forgiveness, while the short irons are a more traditional width (here's an image) for better shot-making ability and control.

The i15 features a tungsten weight in the toe to add forgiveness without being visible at address or adding any size to the clubhead. A stabilizing bar and a Custom Tuning Port (CTP) help to add the feel that better players expect from an iron.

Ping i15 Tungsten Weight

The i15s are available in sets of 3-PW, and come with either the PING-designed AWT steel (Soft R, R, S and X flexes) or TFC 149i graphite shaft (L, Soft R, R and S flexes). MSRP is $115 per club with steel shafts and $142.50 per club with graphite shafts.

PING i15 Iron Set
PING's i15 set, 3-PW, looks sleek and sexy with a powerful black/maroon paint job and dark silver.

The Latest PING Hybrids

With everyone and their brother (including the vast majority of PGA Tour golfers) putting a hybrid in the bag, PING is advancing their two hybrid lines with a new-look G15 and a classic but improved i15 model. Let's take a look at each.

G15 Hybrids
PING's new G15 hybrids are designed to launch the ball high and straight for the mid to high handicapper.

PING G15 Hybrid Lineup

Featuring a new squarer shape and an iron-like clubface, the G15 hybrids set up and play more like an iron than a fairway wood. This design provides improved launch angles and reduces spin on the ball, leading to a higher, flatter trajectory with more carry. An internal toe weight makes the G15 the most forgiving hybrids that PING has ever made.

PING G15 Internal Weighting

They come in five lofts: 17°, 20°, 23°, 27°, and 31°. Shaft options include PING-designed AWT steel (Soft R, R, S and X), TFC149H (L, Soft R, R, S and X) and Aldila Serrano 85 Hybrid (R, S and X). MSRP is $160 per club for steel and $185 per club for graphite.

i15 Hybrids
PING i15 Hybrid HeroContrary to the iron-like G15, PING's i15 line of hybrids has a more traditional shape, but - as we'll see throughout these two sets - have a bit more in common than you might think at first.

With strong lofts and a low center of gravity (you can see why), the i15 hybrids provide penetrating, tour-preferred ball flights that comfortably take the position of long irons or even shorter fairway metals. The spin rate is reduced in order to help keep shots under control while providing a little extra distance from a variety of lies.

PING i15 Hybrid Lineup

The i15s come in three lofts: 17°, 20°, and 23°. They are available in PING-designed AWT steel (Soft R, R, S and X), TFC700H (R, S and X) and UST Mamiya AXIVcore Tour Red 85 Hybrid (R, S and X). MSRP is $180 per club for steel and $210 per club for graphite.

Fairway Metals

Great off the tee or off the deck, you won't find many players who don't have a fairway metal.

G15 Fairway Metals
The G15 fairway metals are designed to get the ball in the air, keep the ball in the air for a long time, and land the ball softly.

PING G15 Fairway Models

The G15 line features external weight pads, which move the center of gravity low and to the rear of the club, adding both effective loft and increased forgiveness. Elongated, low-profile heads help maximize the head volume and forgive mis-hits.

G15 External Weight Pad
The PING G15 fairway metals feature an external stainless steel weight to move the CG low and back.

The PING G15 is available in four lofts: 3- (15.5°), 4- (17°), 5- (18.5°), and 7- (21.5°) woods, with the 3-, 4-, and 5-woods available in a draw model as well. These fairway metals come with PING-designed TFC149F (L, Soft R, R, S and X) and Aldila Serrano 75 Fairway (R, S and X). MSRP is $230 per club.

i15 Woods
The i15 woods are designed to create lower, piercing shots that better players expect out of their fairway metals. A slightly elongated head offers some forgiveness, while the internal weighting gives players the lower ball flight that they crave.

PING i15 Fairway Hero

The i15 woods come in three lofts: a strong 3- (14°), traditional 3- (15.5°) and 5- (18.5°) wood. Shaft options include PING-designed TFC700F (R, S and X) and UST Mamiya AXIVcore Tour Red 79 (R, S and X). MSRP is $265 per club.

The Drivers

Finally we arrive at the big dog, and I think you'll be impressed with PING's offerings off the tee.

G15 Driver
PING G15 Driver HeroThe new G15 driver is loaded with technology. The 460cc head is designed for maximum forgiveness and distance. Thin crown technology helps save weight, which was moved to optimize launch angles for higher and straighter shots.

A longer, larger face increases ball speed and reduces spin to help get all the distance that you can out of your tee shot. The larger face provides an expanded sweet spot that provides a more consistent hitting area spanning the whole face. This maximizes ball speed even on mis-hits and adds to the forgiveness for long, consistent drives.

PING has paired the G15 head with the new PING-designed TFC149D high balance point shaft, which allowed them to add a little mass to the head without increasing swingweight or overall club weight.

G15 Longer Face More Forgiveness
PING's G15 driver has a longer, larger hitting area and increased forgiveness on all types of mis-hits.

The G15 comes in four lofts: 9°, 10.5°, 12°, and 13.5°. Draw models are available in all but the 13.5° loft. The club is offered with the PING-designed TFC149D (L, Soft R, R, S and X flexes) and Aldila Serrano 60 (R, S and X flexes) shafts. MSRP is $350.

The i15 Driver
PING i15 Driver HeroThe i15 is a tour-style driver. What's that mean, exactly? For starters, it's got a fade-biased head that allows for an aggressive release through impact and greater workability.

The traditional pear-shaped head is paired with a deeper face, which provides greater ball speed and a solid feel as well as the look at address that better players prefer. The hosel is positioned slightly behind the face, enhancing workability.

The i15 comes in three lofts: 8°, 9.5°, and 11°. No draw models here, as this club is all about shaping your shot and controlling your golf ball while sending it hundreds of yards from the tee. The club is offered with the PING-designed TFC700D (R, S and X flexes) and UST AXIVcore Tour Red 69 (R, S and X flexes) shafts.

Ping i15 Driver

A Brief Word from PING

John K. Solheim had a bit more to say, and rather than filter his language, we thought we'd share it with you here.

Our engineering team continues to research and analyze the needs of all golfers. Our newest families of clubs address the specific performance goals of these players and they are designed accordingly. The G15 Series appeals to the majority of golfers who rely on the easier-to-hit attributes of a maximum forgiveness, higher launch type of club. With the i15s, a lot of players will be attracted to the added control and versatility they offer. The i15s will deliver the forgiveness we all need, but they've been engineered to provide the workability that a lot of more skilled golfers look for in their clubs.

The early feedback from our Tour staff has been very favorable. Several players put the product in play immediately and others will wait for the opportune time.

This article was written by a guest author. If you'd like to contribute, send us an email.

Discussion

  1. bump-n-mi says:

    Man, those things sure are "busy" looking.

  2. Man, those things sure are "busy" looking.

    They are, but 90% of it's hidden at address.

  3. wazzu8 says:

    How do the i15's look at set up? I do not like the way the long irons look from that picture of them standing up

  4. CaptainSpaulding says:

    Would like to see more pictures of clubs at address, but those soles on the i15's look way too wide to be shotmaker's clubs.

    But I wouldn't mind sampling the fairway metals and hybrids. Always been a big fan of ping's fairway metals.

  5. Kyle McVay says:

    dude you should totally get to try those out if you havent already for such a detailed look into them

  6. DFB says:

    How do the i15's look at set up? I do not like the way the long irons look from that picture of them standing up

    Ive hit the i10's alot, and they look like a traditional players iron at address. Reasonable offset and a sleek topline. The soles are slightly larger than a typical players long iron, but you cant really see that from address. You lose a bit of feel, but overall they're really nice clubs. The longer irons are easy to get airborn. If the i15's are an improvement on the qualities of the i10, then Ping will have themselves a good product.

  7. Shane says:

    Review PLEASE!!! :smile:

    Verrrrrry interested in hearing how the drivers perform, especially that i15. Looks like a beauty.

  8. Cinco says:

    Looks and sounds like a great looking set of clubs! I currently play the Ping I3+ irons and love them!

    I'll add this to my ever increasing list of irons to look at in my next purchase! Currently it is Mizuno MP52, Callaway X22, Titleist AP1/2, and now the Ping G15/I15.

  9. Strongly considering getting a set of the G15's for my wife. Can't wait to see them in person.

  10. Dan Kelly says:

    Im confused. I am an 8-9 handicapper that is 55 years old, looking to replace my i3 irons. Don't have a clue whether i should buy the i15's or the G15's. I am in a place where availability is limited to have them fitted. I usually by the standard set ups. Any recommendations?

  11. Terry Tuggle says:

    Im confused. I am an 8-9 handicapper that is 55 years old, looking to replace my i3 irons. Don't have a clue whether i should buy the i15's or the G15's. I am in a place where availability is limited to have them fitted. I usually by the standard set ups. Any recommendations?

    Dan,
    From one golfer to another, I would go with the i15's. My first set of irons were the Wilson 1200LT's with the tungsten inserts i bought in the early eighties. I loved them; the toe weighting puts the center of gravity in the center of the club face, which makes toe hits go straighter than an conventional design. The best way to check where the balance point is, is to lay your iron face down on a flat surface; then put something round under the head perpendicular to the sole. Where the club wants to balance is the center of gravity and the exact sweet spot. With you being an 8 or 9, i think you would be better off with more workability.
    Terry

  12. Tim says:

    Please explain why the G 15's would hurt the shotmaker? I don't understand this point--and is there no one out there who doesn't need a little "forgiveness" ? (Tiger Woods need not reply)

  13. Terry Tuggle says:

    Please explain why the G 15's would hurt the shotmaker? I don't understand this point--and is there no one out there who doesn't need a little "forgiveness" ? (Tiger Woods need not reply)

    Hi Tim,
    My take on this is that the G15 designed is for the higher handicap player. They go strait but it is harder to make the Fade and Draw while the i15 design has more workability in that department. That is why the better players use blades; they are good enough to hit the sweet spot every time and can make the ball curve in both directions. I would say if you are a 15 handicap and are looking to improve, go with the i15 design. If you are above that go with the G15 design; if you start breaking eighty then the i15 design or the S57 design will be a way to improve your shot making with deep Fades and draws.
    Terry

  14. Sagar says:

    Hey Guys,
    need a little help !!
    I'm getting myself a new set of golf clubs.
    I'm a high handicapper and I'm actually working on my swing so that i can hit the ball straight everytime, I'm not trying to work the ball.
    Here's what i have decided -

    DRIVER - PING G15
    IRONS - PING G15 - 3-PW
    FAIRWAY - CALLWAY X-HOT 3 WOOD
    HYBRID - ADAMS GOLF A4
    WEDGES - TITLEIST VOKEY DESIGN SPIN MILLED

    Any suggestion would be welcomed.
    I'm still confused in deciding a fairway wood and hybrid.

    Thank you!
    Sagar

  15. Terry Tuggle says:

    Hey Guys,
    need a little help !!
    I'm getting myself a new set of golf clubs.

    Sagar,
    I am a fan of the Bobby Jones series fairway woods and hybrids; I like their sole design. Their advantage is less drag coming out of the rough and side hill lies.
    http://www.bobbyjonesgolf.net/
    Terry

  16. Peter says:

    Hi,
    I am a 5 handicap and have been playing the G5 for a number of years. I hit a slight draw off the tee but have no desire to "work" my ball flight on my tee shots. Should I go with G15 or i15
    Thanks,
    Peter

  17. Terry Tuggle says:

    I am a 5 handicap and have been playing the G5 for a number of years. I hit a slight draw off the tee but have no desire to "work" my ball flight on my tee shots. Should I go with G15 or i15

    Hi Peter,

    You could do what Heath Slocum did. He went with the G15 driver and the i15 irons; that combination sounded good to me. A strait tee shot with the G15 driver and irons that can be worked in both directions if you need to.

  18. Tom B says:

    I'm a 7 handicap. I have hit the i15s and they are best irons from Ping that I've hit. They definitely have more forgiveness then the i10. If you miss center contact with the iron on the toe side, the ball carries very well (of course usually right of target). They also have added a steep loft of yellow 1.5, which is what I use and this has helped also. Make sure to get fitted to the correct loft color.

  19. rudy says:

    Hi Terry and Peter,
    Im not sure i entirely agree with the stereo typical logic of a low handicapper not using the more forgicing set of irons in this case the G series. LIke Ralph Maltby says, its a bit strange to want to have the most forgiving driver, but when it comes to irons, we still tend to stick to " traditional heads that are definetly more difficult to get airbourne" ( when actually yr margin of error is LEss with irons)
    Golf i about getting the ball from A to B, with minimum fuss, not need any "working of the ball" if you can help it..
    My simple logic is more to do with frequency of play. If you play less than 60 rounds a year ( an average REGULAR golfer plays 54 full rounds a year, you need all the help of technology. Irrespective of the the handicap.
    Now that defenition of technology could differ.
    I am a 8 handicap, i use the Ping g10 and the ping g15 irons, and now have switched ( a big ego swallow) to 3 and 4 hybrids ( g15)
    They may not look as macho as my previous TM Rac LT 2's ( again super clubs - the best ever TM irons), but i dont mind as im hittin 12 GIR now from 7.
    Hope this helps.
    R

  20. Terry Tuggle says:

    Hi Rudy,
    I will agree with Ralph's lodgic; the blades are much harder to hit for the weekend golfer. Here we are talking very little difference in the G15 and i15 irons. If you look close you will see the sole on the G15's are wider and the head just marginally bigger. The main difference of these two designs is the Tungsten inserts. What this accomplishes is to put the ceter of gravity in the center on the club face. I as I said earlier , my first set were some Wilson 1200LT's with the tungsten insert. Add the sweet sopt on those clubs are dead center. Because it is in the center when you have a toe hit, it will only be about an inch off offf the center of gravity. On a conventional blade desidn the center of gravity is between the center of the club face and the hosel. When you hit a toe shot with it, it is more like 1&1/2 inches away from the center of gravity. That is why they were more forgiving than a blade type, as Tom B. said, when you hit it on the toe it will hold strait and just leak a little to the right. That is exactly the way my 1200 LT's did. The main reason the better players should opt for these i15 is their workability. Having to fade are draw one from behind a tree for example. It is nice to have a club that you can bend it the need arises; we can't be in the fairway everytime! The main thing is that it is important to know where your center of gravity is and mark the top of the blade with a marker and cover it with tape. To find that spot, put your iron face down on a flat surface, then put something round, like a drill bit underneath and perpendicular to the sole of the club; the point at which the toe will balance with the heel will be the center of gravity. They are all different, depending on the irons design, so do this little test, and you will know where the center of gravity is on your clubs.
    After my Zings got stolen a few years back, I got around to getting another set to get back to playing again, they were the Wilson MOI's, a few months ago I was crusing E-Bay and found a set of Wilson 1200's (New old stock) never sold or hit. I ended up getting them just because they were so close to my first set. I was amazed to find out that the loft on the MOI 9 iron was the same as the loft on the 1200 7 iron. The shaft was just 1/2 inch shorter. So all these long distances you see on TV by the Pro's are not that for off from the rest of us older players. If you are use to distances with older clubs, you need to add at least one club. Infact the MOI 5 iron and the 1200 4 iron were identical in loft and length!
    BTW, do not sell the long irons; it is best to pull the Hybrids in windy conditions in favor of the long irons. You hit a hybread into the wind and it will ballon up in the air and fall strait down.
    HTH
    Terry

  21. Rudy says:

    Hi Terry,
    Thats a heck of a tip on the CoG. Im gonna try it too! Though i wonder what ill do with it once i find it! I usually have simple ambitions on just managing to hit any part of the ball with any part of the club ! ( just kidding)
    But yes, ill retain the long irons too.
    Ciao
    R

  22. Rudy says:

    Tried using the 5 iron of I 15, they are more difficult to get airbourne and have a higher swing weight. I would still suggest this club only for a 90 plus 6 iron speed swinger.
    R

  23. Sagar says:

    Hi.
    Do the G15 irons and hybrids conform to the new groove rules?

  24. Terry Tuggle says:

    Do the G15 irons and hybrids conform to the new groove rules?

    It is my understanding that the new V groove clubs will not be released untill 2010, however the square groves will be legal for amatuers until 2024 offically.

  25. Rudy says:

    Ping G and I 15 are both new grooves, conforming to the 2011 rules. They are the first company to be off the block on this.
    Of course what Terry says it tru about 2024 for amateurs.

  26. They are the first company to be off the block on this.

    No, they're not. Titleist's irons have conformed for years, and some other companies have likewise had conforming irons.

  27. Rudy says:

    G15 conform.
    Most of the other irons launched in 2009 dont.
    Of course there would be conforming irons from manufacturers over time.
    Rudy

  28. John says:

    I test hit the I10 model in 2008 (one with regular shafts), and thought I might get them this past spring. But, the I10s felt a little klunky compared to the Callaway X20 and Callaway X22, and Titleist AP1 irons.

    Do the I15s have better feel than the I10s? If I got I15s, it would be an odd recipe with regular flex, midkick shafts - probably lightweight steel.

    I have the X20s now with stock Uniflex shafts. Only problems: they feel sticky coming out of the rough, and tend to rise a bit high on the short irons.

    This past season:
    *changed from stiff to regular shafts
    *got new woods and irons
    *am on year 2 of seriously rebuilding my swing
    *now have 21 HDCP (down from 25)
    *driver swing speed = 85 mph
    *am 58 years old, reasonably good shape

    Would I15s be something I might be able to use, or is it too much club for me?

  29. Rudy says:

    Hi John,
    Id reccomend the G15's for you actually. I am a 8 handicap now, Was 10 till i moved to g15s recently and have shot my lowest 3 rounds ( 75, 76, 76) in the last 3 years in one month..
    Now thats not statistically significant, but the point is - if a low handicapper who has played with "i" series type of clubs get benefits from the G range, you are more likely to get an exponential advantage.
    Try them, they may pleasantly surprise you.

  30. Terry Tuggle says:

    I agree with Rudy on this; I think you will be happier with the G15's in your case. With Rudy's results in the last month perhaps the i15's are kind of like the square groove/V groove issue; for about 90+ percent of the golfers, it will make no difference. It you can get an oppertunity to try both of them out at the range, do so, perhaps when you get fitted for your swing.

  31. Andre Bedard says:

    Hey, so, im 17 years old and an amateur. Im looking to qualify for the sony open on oahu. If i happen to qualify would the new groove rule affect me? Is it just for the Pro's or pro tournaments?

  32. Steve says:

    Changed to i15 irons last year...very happy. Playing to a 4-5 handicap and using X/9.5 Cobra driver (Speed Pro D) w/ Aldila Proto 65-S. 105 swing speed, 2600 rpm and a 3 yard draw natural ball flight...about 265 carry. Thinking about Ping driver options~G or i?? Your thoughts...

  33. Terry Tuggle says:

    I have not heard anyone using the i series drivers; I can tell you some of the tour players are using the I15 irons and the G15 driver. Unless you are looking to work the ball offf the tee and with a lower trajectory, I would go with the more forgiving G15. Less face it most players want a strait long tee shot and only need to hit draws and fades when the shot calls for it. If strait will work with the shot, most will go for it. The only advantage is the high fade for the approach for stopping the ball faster for a shallow green. As Ben Hogan put it, the center of the green is the place to be; on a left pin hit a draw to make the ball roll towards the pin, and for a right pen hit a fade to make the ball roll twards the pin. If you do not pull it off, your still in the center of the green, and it is nice insurance on a push or pull. Sorry I could not help on the I15 driver.

  34. Jarle Nesbo says:

    I've just been for a customfitting for a new Ping golfset. My hcp is 9(have been 6 before I got kids...). The clubfitter told me I should try I15 irons and the rest G15, all with stiff shaft. I've never played with stiff shaft before but I guess he knows his job, this clubfitter?
    As I'm a linksplayer(you can call me "lefty"..) it's hard to find clubs with different type of shafts for me to try(I live in Norway). And what about steel vs graphite shafts?
    Any thoughts on irons and shafts?. I have to make my mind up next week.

  35. Terry Tuggle says:

    Lefty,
    i would say that is sound advice. The stiff shafts will narrow your margin of error, they may be a little harder to hit than regular shafts but you will get use to them. If you have ever had a set of Pings before, the Ping Eye2's were like the Model T; you could get any color you wanted as long as it was black! All they offered were stiff shafts back then. I would recommend going with the steel shafts for the irons and the graphite for the rest.
    I always could hit fairwoods better off the deck with graphite shafts. Either way you go should not make much difference these days.
    HTH,
    Terry

  36. Jarle Nesbo says:

    Thank's for your reply! How did you know? I had a Ping Eye2 set 10 years ago, and I loved them. Lately I've been using Wilson irons with regular shaft, but without enough upright clubhead it seems. I hit the toe in the ground, my fitter told me. I also have to say I'm having a hard time getting a draw with my irons. I've been a notorious slicer in my earlier days. Now I hit my iron dead straight or get a little fade. My driver(big Bertha) reg. shaft on the other hand often goes into a hook or pull.
    I know....I lot more practise on my swing is needed here!! I just don't want to battle with wrong shafts, as well as a faulty swing.
    But what about the Ping wedges with the new grooves. Will that affect me game, you think?
    "Lefty"

    Lefty,i would say that is sound advice. The stiff shafts will narrow your margin of error, they may be a little harder to hit than regular shafts but you will get use to them. If you have ever had a set of Pings before, the Ping Eye2's were like the Model T; you could get any color you wanted as long as it was black! All they offered were stiff shafts back then. I would recommend going with the steel shafts for the irons and the graphite for the rest.I always could hit fairwoods better off the deck with graphite shafts. Either way you go should not make much difference these days.HTH,Terry

  37. Terry Tuggle says:

    I don't think so! If you were a scratch them perhaps. I think spinning wedges is over rated anyway. A pitch and release is much more consistan than trying to spin it to a stop. The biggest advantage for the pros with the square grooves were being able to stop the ball on the green from the ruff at 180 yards out. You can still get the square groove this year and play them untill 2024 for just regular play. Those new Cleavland wedges with the lazer lines look good to me in that respect, but they will not be made after 2010 and will be illagel for competition. However for regular play they can be used untill 2024, so if you want a set or two, get them this year or lose out!
    One thing about your swing, flatten it out at the top and make sure your left wrist, or right wrist if you are a lefty is not cupped at the top of the back swing. Make sure the back of your hand and your forearm stay strait. this will cause you to swing from the inside out on the thru swing; and hold your right/left wrist cock (which ever applies) as long as you can before you roll the wrists over for impact. It should make you feel like a more sweeping/arching action and you should be ok on the standard lie.
    I also had a vertical swing and used white dots, it solved the problem of the toe hitting the ground, but it did not solve my slice problem. A vertial swing will cause you to cup your wrist and come over the top from outside to inside, which generates a clockwise spin on the ball making it slice. And of course the oppisite is ture with the inside to outside swing; it will put a counterclockwise spin on the ball causing it to draw, or hook if it is too severe. The flat wrist at the top will cause the inside out swing.
    HTH,
    Terry

  38. John Jones says:

    So is it safe to say around August every year is when Ping releases a new set, will they release a new set this August that's better than the 15 series?

  39. Mario says:

    Hi,

    At the moment i play mizuno mx-25 irons.

    Im about to buy new irons
    I use to play well as a kid, now i retunr to golf. Im a 12 handicap, getting better every day.

    Although i still make some basic mistakes, anyways

    i wonder if i should buy the G15 or the i15?

    For some reason the big sole of the G15 sometimes makes me think that will improve my game and when im about to buy them i feel them weird.

    I see all these reviews that the i15 are for more advanced players and so it makes me nervous that i wont be able to hit the ball as well.

    any one can give me an advice?

  40. Dan says:

    Mario,
    I would look at the wedges of the G series first because they have very large soles with lots of bounce that is makes finesse shots around the green hard. I would say the G's are fine but I made the mistake of buying them and wish I had bought the i's. I am a 8-10 Handicap.
    Hope that helps

  41. Terry Tuggle says:

    Ni Mario,
    My best advice is to hit them and see. here is a link to find out where you can give them a test run.
    http://www.ping.com/demodays/default.aspx
    Here is another link that shows some of the differences:
    http://www.ping.com/clubs/irons.aspx
    I don't think you would be making a mistake to get the G-15's, but it depends on your type of golfer you are. Do you like draws and fades? Or is a striat shot the most desirable shot in your game? The fades and draws are special circumstances shots that will help on different approach shots, but for most moderate handiappers, a striat shot will be enough. In the final analysis, the proof is in the pudding! Go find a Demo Day event andtake them for a test ride; they will also be able to fit you for your swing angle.
    HTH,
    Terry

  42. Terry Tuggle says:

    Mario,

    Dan brings up a good point here. I would got with specitiy wedges no matter what irons i choose. The Cleavland wedges has a well established reputation and i like the Laser lines on the clubs they offer until the end of the year.

    Playable by amatuers until 2024, but will stop production at the end of 2010. Another fine wedge set is the Dave Pelz wedge sets with the very hard incerts with the milled surface; you get the longer grip he offers, he also offers your choice on about ever aspect of the wedges with Custom specifications. The grips are very good for delicate shots around the green, and do not hesitate to get the 64 degree wedge, you will be amazed at how many differnt type shots you can hit with it. You can make a "behind the right foot chip" come out like a pitch shot, and a normal swing come out like a flop shot! http://www.pelzgolf.com/dave_pelz_golf_pro_shop/golf_wedges_pelz.aspx

    HTH,
    Terry

  43. Mario says:

    Hi Dan,

    Why you feel you make a mistake buying the g's?

    i feel that it will happen the same to me, i'm a very competitive golfer.So for some reason thats why it makes me thing that buying the g's i will be cheating myself instead of trying improve my self.

    My clubs right now have midsize sole and i hit them well, thats why i dont wanna go to the oversize. it would make it easier but no challenge then.????

    i live in panama and theres no testers around here.

    Thanks for the advice TERRY.

    Mario

  44. Dan says:

    Hey Mario,
    I play on a lot of bermuda and zosia grass and it seems that the larger soled G's "catch" the grass prior to me hitting the ball. Now this may just be me. The wedges I mentioned have a lot of bounce as do all the clubs. If I had to do it over again i would buy the i's. I have already purchased a 56 & 60 degree wedges to replace my existing G wedges.(Titleist) I will mention again that my old clubs were i3's that I used for about 15 yrs. The new i's are similar. I bought the G's because I am 56 yrs. old and thought they would probably last me well into my senior yrs. If I were you I would buy the i's. Hope this helps.

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