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Mizuno MP T-10 Wedges Review

Nov. 30, 2009     By     Comments (26)

Some of the best wedges get even better with the addition of Quad-Cut grooves.

Mizuno MP-T 10 WedgesLate 2009 seems like an odd time to release your most aggressively grooved wedges to date, but that's just what Mizuno is doing with the MP T-10 wedges. The wedges are similar to the company's MP-T wedges (reviewed here) but up the ante a bit when it comes to grooves. Mizuno says their new "Quad Cut" technology provides strict control of the width, depth, draft angle, and shoulder radius of every groove.

End result? The biggest grooves and the most spin allowed under the rules.

And really, the end of 2009 is the perfect time to release aggressive wedges. Mizuno has all of 2010 to assemble and sell the clubs, and amateurs like you and I have anywhere from four to fourteen years to play the clubs.

Though I don't advocate "stocking up" on wedges to "beat" the groove rule changes coming down the pipe, I do advocate stocking up on the latest wedges from Mizuno simply because they're so good!

I've spent a few weeks with the MP T-10s. Read on to see what I think of the latest scoring clubs from Mizuno (if you couldn't figure it out already).

Technology
Not a lot has changed since the MP-T, and you can't blame Mizuno for sticking with what works. Like the MP-T, the MP T-10 uses Mizuno's patented "Grain Flow Forging" technique to shape 1025E Pure Select mild carbon steel into rough clubheads before they're shaped, ground, and cut to their final form.

As with the MP-T, the "T" in MP T-10 stands for "Teardrop," which describes the shape of the clubhead. The other option is a rounder shape, but the majority of golfers seem to prefer the teardrop and most wedges these days match that shape.

The MP T-10 continues to feature minimal offset and sports a new "360 Grind" sole that's intended to give players maximum playability (the grind is essentially the same as the MP-T's C-grind, but wraps 360 degrees around to bevel the topline of the club). The relief it provides in the heel and toe areas allow players to open the clubface without significantly altering the bounce characteristics. The MP T-10's rolled leading edge leads to minimal digging, and a cambered mid-sole and beveled trailing edge minimizes turf drag through and towards the end of impact.

Grain Flow Forged vs. Cast

While the MP-T wedges featured "CNC Max Milled" square grooves for optimum spin, the MP T-10 takes that up a notch with the "Quad Cut" grooves. Though these clubs don't conform to the Condition of Competition the USGA and PGA Tour will enforce in 2010 and beyond, they conform to 2009 rules and are conforming for amateurs through 2014 or 2024, depending on your level of play.

Mizuno's Quad Cut Groove Technology is essentially a manufacturing process that provides strict control of the width, depth, draft angle, and shoulder radius of every groove. By using such a precise process, the consistency of the grooves is guaranteed. Spin control is ensured from most any lie due to the aggressive nature of the grooves.

Esthetics
Like the MP-T, obviously, the MP T-10 is a teardrop shaped wedge. I think I'm in a fairly large majority in preferring the shape of a teardrop style wedge over the more rounded "spoony" looking wedges. The MP T-10 is a classic teardrop, with a fairly flat leading edge and a squarer high toe. The 360 Grind improves the topline by beveling it, reducing its apparent thickness. Aside from the subtle differences that make this a Mizuno wedge, it's the same wedge look most have come to appreciate and enjoy.

Mizuno MP-T10 Wedge Address

The MP T-10 retains the same basic adornments and stampings as the MP-T, albeit in different physical locations. The sole, in addition to the Mizuno logo (which always looked like a bit like a bird to me) and the loft, the MP T-10 adds the club's bounce in white paint-fill beneath the loft.

The back of the club features an "MP-T10" stamping (which varies from the official "MP T-10" name) in black and white paintfill. Beneath the topline towards the heel the "Mizuno" name appears, while the toe corner is adorned with a "Quad Cut Grooved" stamp and logo. "Grain Flow Forged" is stamped in block letters high on the hosel. All three of the last things mentioned remain deliciously paint-fill free.

As long-time readers know, I'm not a fan of excessive graphics or decoration. I'd be content with a wedge that listed the maker, model, loft, and bounce in unpainted stamping. The MP T-10 come close: the only paints used are black and white and the only "extras" are the Mizuno logo and the "Quad Cut Grooved" stamping. The ferrule is plain black. The face - the only thing that actually matters when you're playing golf - is 100% free of graphics or decoration.

The MP-T series offered two choices: chrome and Black Nickel. The MP T-10 comes in "White Satin" (sort of like brushed chrome) and my new favorite: Black Satin. The latter improves, in my opinion, on the Black Nickel finish substantially. The treatment isn't truly black, but it's just about a perfect smoky grey that renders glare a complete non-issue.

I've hesitated to use the term "sexy" to refer to golf clubs in the past - they're just golf clubs, after all - but the MP T-10 in Black Satin are dead sexy.

Performance
I have two things to say.

First, nearly every model of wedge from every top manufacturer is a quality piece of gear that is more than capable of hitting a golf ball well. The difference between wedges from Titleist, Cleveland, Callaway, TaylorMade, Mizuno, and any other manufacturer are small.

Second, I plan to spend the rest of 2009 and most of 2010 with these Mizuno wedges in my bag. They're the best I've ever played, bar none.

Mizuno MP-T10 Wedge Sole

Now, to temper that second with the first, a portion of what puts the Mizuno wedges over the top of, say, my Vokeys are the looks. I like the Oil Can finish on my Vokey wedges, but the Black Satin is the bee's knees. I talked about the looks plenty in the "Esthetics" section, though, so I'm not going to keep talking about it here.

Besides, the truth is that I think I'd still like the Mizuno MP T-10 wedges over any other if they were pink with purple spots. Okay, maybe it'd depend on the shade of purple, but these wedges aren't just attractive, of course - they perform incredibly well, too.

I tested two wedges, both in the Black Satin look: a 54-09 model and a 60-05. My short game style is more Stan Utley-esque than anything, so I believe in having a good amount of bounce on my primary wedge. The 60° model is a specialty club that I might go weeks without using, so it has a bit less bounce.

Prior to testing, I'd been using Vokey Spin-Milled wedges and the Mizuno MP-Ts from a few years ago (along with, for various reviews, wedges by other companies). My wedges have had similar lofts (48° PW, 54° and 60° sand and lob wedges), so I was able to easily compare the wedges to years of playing history with 20 or 30 different wedges. As I expected, the distances were the same as with all of my other wedges, so there's nothing to write about here.

In the past, I've written a lot about grooves. All modern wedges have pretty much the maximum allowable groove volume, but some seem to be sharper than others. My Vokey Spin Milled wedges, for example, are too sharp when brand new for my taste - I take them into the bunkers to soften the edges a bit.

Mizuno MP-T10 Wedge Back

The MP T-10 wedges offer a bit more bite "out of the box" than the MP-T before, but the difference is barely noticeable. In my book, that's a good thing. They spin a lot without going so far as to require a "softening" session in the bunkers prior to play.

From a clean lie in the fairway, these wedges will do just about anything you can ask of them. My normal full or 3/4 shot with a 54° wedge takes one hop and pulls back a few feet. From a good lie in the fairway, I was able to pull the ball back as much as 15 yards to a front pin when necessary, and also to take a bit of spin off to allow a few feet of release.

From the rough, and given the Quad Cut Grooves, performance was almost always of the "hit-bounce-stop" variety. In drier rough, more spin was possible, but even in the thickest, juiciest rough the ball tended to sit fairly quickly.

Around the green I saw a bit more bite than I remember getting from the MP-Ts when new. The little bit of extra spin made playing some lower, more controllable shots possible, particularly the "hop up a tier and spin to a stop" shot. That shot comes off the MP T-10 beautifully.

Since adopting the Stan Utley short game methods a season or two ago, I've been using my 54° club from the sand except in the rare times when I need a lot of height. The 54° MP T-10 is a wonderful performer in the sand. The heel in particular seems to have just enough bounce to make popping the ball (and the club) out easy while not offering so much bounce that getting beneath the ball poses any trouble.

The sole grind on the Mizuno doesn't seem to have quite as much camber as the Vokey models I've been playing, but where the Mizunos really succeed is in their toe and heel relief. I found that the toe relief allows for a smoother chipping motion, which often puts the club up on its toe a bit. The heel relief really, really comes in handy when you lay the club open a bit on firm ground. Normally, a club's effective bounce increases as you do this, but the relief on the MP T-10 sole seems to keep a fairly consistent bounce, which lets me play a more sweeping shot that lets me use the bounce rather than work to avoid it.

The only time the decreased bounce may hinder play is in the bunkers, but as I said, in the Utley style, it's almost a non-issue. If you like to lay the face open, just remember that you're not adding significantly to the bounce and play accordingly.

Mizuno MP-T10 Wedge Toe

Feel? The MP T-10 is a forged wedge, and though I believe that really doesn't matter much (I think even PGA Tour golfers would have a hard time telling the difference between otherwise identical quality forged and cast clubs), I will admit that if pressured I'd give the MP T-10s really high marks for feel. Everything is muted, soft, and conveys a fine sense of control. The word "satiny" sprang into my mind just now, so perhaps that's the finish and the "raw" nature of the wedge playing on my psychology. What's that they say - perception is reality? I feel that the MP T-10s are easily among the best wedges I've ever felt, so that's my reality.

Specifications
Two glare-resistant finishes are available for the MP T-10: plated white satin and raw black satin. These wedges come in a variety of lofts, ranging from 50° up to 64°, with the 50°, 53°, 56°, and 58° models using a 35.25" True Temper Dynamic Gold shaft and the 60° and 64° using the same shaft, but a quarter inch shorter. Most lofts have multiple bounce options as well. Beware that not all models are available to lefties. Mizuno again went with the Golf Pride M-21 58 round grip as the standard. Luckily, for players such as myself that require a little adjustment, Mizuno's Custom Department offers a wide variety of customization options, from lie angle adjustment to alternate grips and shafts. They cost $120 or so.

Conclusion
The MP T-10 are the best wedges I've had the pleasure of using. I've been through a bunch, and there's nothing I dislike about them. Not one thing.

Spin is perfect. The looks are sleek and sexy. Even if "better feel" is entirely in my head, the MP T-10 receives high marks there as well. The sole grind continues to be one of my favorites, offering just enough relief in just the right places.

The Mizuno MP T-10 performs, and it looks good doing it.

Posted in: Clubs, Review Comments (26)

Discussion

  1. Everardo says:

    Great write up, I've always loved Mizuno wedges and will be switching back once I've used up my Sonartec t35's

  2. Neil says:

    Wow - sound impressive.

    How does the black satin finish compare to the Cleveland's 'black pearl' finish?

  3. How does the black satin finish compare to the Cleveland's 'black pearl' finish?

    I haven't seen a "black pearl" club in a few weeks and haven't held an MP T-10 up to a CG12 in "black pearl" or anything like that, but from memory it seems that the two are very similar - darker than most "grey" or "smokey" finishes on clubs, but not as dark black (or as shiny) as some putters or the crowns of some fairway metals and drivers, for example.

    The pictures of the MP T-10s are right up there in the review, so if you've seen any black pearls recently, you could compare better than I.

  4. Neil says:

    The pictures of the MP T-10s are right up there in the review, so if you've seen any black pearls recently, you could compare better than I.

    Fair point - although it's hard to say exactly from a picture.

    I like the 'Black Pearl' finish on my Cleveland's however when purchased I would say that the finsh was 'enhanced' with some sort of additional blackening which quickly rubbed off. To me the 'Black Satin' looks like the 'Black Pearl' followng the disapearence of the initial coating - no bad thing!

    (Probably nobody else cares about this comparison... but for what it's worth!)

  5. Steve says:

    Very nice review. You mentioned, "nearly every model of wedge from every top manufacturer is a quality piece of gear... the difference between wedges from Titleist, Cleveland, Callaway, TaylorMade, Mizuno, and any other manufacturer are small." Having said this, then choice is about subtleties and feel which for a single digit handicapper is great... but for the golfers with higher handicaps... will we be able to feel or take advantage of the subtlties? Just throwing it out there. I'm buying wedges myself but have no clue where to start... they all feel the same to me!

  6. JJH says:

    Is the black finish similar to an oil can so that it can be removed via coke or something else and then be raw?

    Thanks for the great reviews!

  7. Andrew says:

    I like the 'Black Pearl' finish on my Cleveland's however when purchased I would say that the finsh was 'enhanced' with some sort of additional blackening which quickly rubbed off. To me the 'Black Satin' looks like the 'Black Pearl' followng the disapearence of the initial coating - no bad thing!

    (Probably nobody else cares about this comparison... but for what it's worth!)

    I have gamed three black pearl CG12s for the past year, and have been checking out (and seriously considering) the black satin MP T-10s in the store since they came out. The black satin on the Mizunos is significantly darker than black pearl. In color terms, I would call the Mizuno color "charcoal" and the Cleveland color "gunmetal." The Mizunos are very close to a flat black in person, I believe they look lighter in the above photos. Hope this helps.

  8. Neil says:

    I'm buying wedges myself but have no clue where to start... they all feel the same to me!

    If they all feel the same - and I agree, when you hit a shot well it feels good and vice versa regardless of the brand in your hand...

    But if they do all feel the same then for me there are two main considerations;

    1. Which are you most comfortable with - confidence is king!

    2. What suits your game and shotmaking requirements.
    (Stan Utley's short game bible has a really useful section on the design of wedges, bounce, loft, lie etc. He explains how these characteristics effect play and the types of shot diferrent characteristics are suited too. Well worth reading and considering when buying a set of wedges.)

    If there is a third consideration then probably it would be cost - however I would say that after the putter a good wedge is one of the more important clubs in the bag and therefore well worth the money.

  9. Scott says:

    I personally looked at these yesterday and I had some concern about the grooves. They looked so freshly cut that they were actually shiney... and I wondered if they would rust or become extremely discolored over the years? Does Mizuno say anything about this issue?

  10. Paul says:

    I've had MP-T's for awhile but switched to a 56* Callaway JAWS (black) wedge a couple of weeks ago.

    I was so comfortable with my Mizuno's but I guess the reputation that the MP-T's didn't have the latest/greatest groove technology made me want to switch to something else.

    Reading your review, I may give the 60* black model a try. Question: Will the black finish fade ala the Oil Can Vokeys?

  11. Gary Lewis says:

    Great review. I will be picking up a chrome 56.13 and 60.08 pretty soon, really like the shape of the club and the sole grind looks very good. The amount of spin you get with these wedges sounds just about right. Just guessing it would seem these wedges might be a little easier on golf balls than the Vokey Spin Milled or Callaway with the MD grooves. Would you say they are?

  12. DBake says:

    Since they stamped these MP-T, I would assume they will be coming out with MP-R's are well for the round shaped?

  13. Joe says:

    Does the MP-T 10 White Satin line have a 64* offering? The Mizuno web site lists a 64* in the Black Satin finish but not in the White Satin finish?

    Golf club retail catalogs like Golfsmith imply that a 64* is available in both finishes.

  14. joe says:

    How do you think the mp-t 10 compare to Scratch wedges in overallness, spin and "feel" or i should say which club do you feel is better. Also if you noticed a difference in forgiveness

  15. max says:

    I read this review with great interest because I am not a huge Mizuno fan. After reading the post, I found a 56/10 on the used club rack at Golfsmith. 50 bucks and off I went. After 15 minutes I got back into the car and drove to the store and got a 60/8 (full price). Blew me away. Today the wedges got me up and down 4 times and this part of my game is my greatest weakness. At any rate I will in fact be getting a second set and perhaps a 54 as well since I do think they're worth stocking up before the big freeze out. I play Titleist AP2's which I find easier to hit than any Mizuno iron but these MP-T 10's are easier than any Vokey (or Cleveland, TM and Callaway). It was this review that got me to try something I would ordinarily have not touched.

  16. max says:

    By the way, IMO these outperform Scratch as well as Miura, Chikara, Fourteen and Hakusa. They are all fine wedges but in my clumsy hands t he Mizuno is the best, by far

  17. jay says:

    Hi Erik - Im set on these wedges, they are shmick as.

    But Im a bit torn between which colour to get? The more traditional Satin Chrome, or the "SEXY" Black? Im a bit wary of comments like this, and just wanto to know how they look over the ball. IE; any different or strange I guess.

    Would love to hear back from you - cause Im ready to purchase these before my Pennant season starts!

    Thanks heaps.

  18. But Im a bit torn between which colour to get? The more traditional Satin Chrome, or the "SEXY" Black? Im a bit wary of comments like this, and just wanto to know how they look over the ball. IE; any different or strange I guess.

    I don't know what to say… I don't find black distracting. I think it frames the ball nicely. But I'm not you, and I don't have your taste, so it's really about what you prefer.

  19. dustyj says:

    Besides the grooves and looks are there any differences vs. the older MP-T's? How much more spin do these grooves give vs. the 08' wedges?

  20. tim mc says:

    How are the MPT-10 grooves on a soft ball cover like the TP-reds? My Vokeys slash the covers of ProV's and TP's and for that reason alone I went back to 588s. I love my MP52s and would love to find a soft feeling wedge that didn't destroy a ball in one swing.

  21. DS says:

    Any thoughts on shafts? I'm about to order some wedges (52, 56, 60) and am wondering if I should order them with the same shafts I have in my irons (KBS Tour Stiff)?

  22. butter says:

    Just bought these. 51.08. 56.14. 60.04....LOVE THEM! I have been practicing with them and have been able to do a wide range of shots from 115yds out to right around the green. I am even able to use the lob wedge out of the bunker when necessary. Highly recommend Mizuno wedges. I might even consider leaving Titleist irons in the garage now as well!

  23. kb says:

    52-07, 56-10, 60-05. best wedges i've ever used. i work at golf galaxy and have used them all. these are just beautiful! puts the cg15s and vokey sm's to shame. put wedge spinners in them. these guys bite hard, yet are gentle on the balls

  24. Dv8621 says:

    I am a new proud owner of three MP T-10 wedges (52-07, 56-10, 60-08). Let me first say I am very partial to Mizuno irons. I play the MP-52s and am so biased I will never purchase any irons that are not Mizuno. With that said, I decided to try the MP T-10 wedges. I can now say I will also only play Mizuno wedges. When struck correctly they are glorious. The feel is in my opinion perfect. This is especially evident right around the green. There is just something about Mizuno club's feel. I am just a little bummed that the new Mizuno forged MP putter is not sold in the United States.

  25. bmartin461 says:

    I just picked up two "like new" MP T-10 wedges (56-13, 60-8). I am so happy with them, especially the 60, easy to hit and the ball flight is very predictable. The fit and finish is outstanding as well. I picked both these up for $100 so I feel it was a great deal for what I got.

  26. Alohaed says:

    Sorry for the extremely late comment. I was fitted for and purchased these in 4 years ago in the Black Nickel. And I didn't even read this before I bought them. A 56 and 60, both bent down 1 degree less, I was told for me to get a better bounce. You are correct, they are sexy. My only complaint, is that they look worn, any nicks and minor scratches are enhanced because they are black. I am planning on replacing my MX200s this year. I would have liked to get non black wedges. Don't like the new Mizzy wedges, and was thinking of Vokeys, Yet as you said, these MPT-10s are fantastic. Typical buttery Mizuno feel. I will keep these, and if need be, reshaft them. Now if I can only learn how to spin the ball on the greens. ; )

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