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It’s the Tiger Woods Way: Manipulation and Revenge

Feb. 18, 2010     By     Comments (46)

More of the same from the greatest golfer - and philanderer - most of us have ever seen.

Thrash TalkWoods will speak Friday, and to the surprise of no one, the rules ensure nothing can go wrong. Plus, in true Tiger fashion, he gets vengeance on the first sponsor to drop him.

As always, it's on Tiger Woods' terms.

Woods has yet to lace up his Nikes, so we can't tell about his driving distance off the tee, his precision into the greens, or his ability to make clutch putts. But we already know two of his most defining characteristics are back in fine form: manipulation and vindictiveness.

Tiger media
Tiger Woods won't face a scene like this Friday. He'll take no questions and only three reporters will be in the room.

The champ was always bound to take the stage, address his transgressions, and begin the healing process. So it's telling that he'll move forward in a way so in tune with his past.

As word broke Wednesday that Woods would address the media, the strict guidelines were close behind. He'll read a statement. He won't take questions. Only three hand-selected "pool" reporters will be in the room. The rest of the media contingent will be allowed to watch Woods speak via TV in a room about a mile away. Just like the good ol' days. Tiger's in charge again and he wants us all to know it.

What else would you expect? Think of how many times Tiger's blown off the post-round interviews, or issued his two-word answers just to get it over with. Sure, you might say he's got no obligation to talk, unless you agree with most golf fans who think he's the biggest story whether he's in first, 26th, or 93rd place.

But truth is, it's to be expected Tiger and his camp would be so incredibly defensive, protective, and insular. The way he has been treated in the tabloids has been disgraceful. To splash unsubstantiated rumors about pregnant mistresses goes beyond anything anyone should have to endure. It makes sense to appear for the first time in a controlled environment.

However, this is too much, and it doesn't make sense for Tiger, either. What can he possibly say Friday? That he's sorry? He's done wrong? He's gone to rehab, straightened himself out? Remind us that he's human? OK, that's great. But we know all that. What we don't know is, how will Tiger Woods react in the face of the questions that are bound to come. The questions will come eventually, so why not face them Friday and start fresh the next time you come out? Instead, you drag it out. Remember as a kid? Just yank the Band-aid, don't slowly peel it off.

It's understandable to restrict access to the event. You don't want Star Magazine, the NY Post, or TMZ there, so you don't credential them. But if you're afraid to face legitimate professional golf writers (these are golf writers after all, not exactly the probing scribes of the White House press corps), then you're either a coward or you're still living in the bubble that tells you you're a god and you're not accountable for your own actions. I'd never call Tiger a coward, which can only mean the bubble that got him into this mess still exists.

The terms and conditions surrounding Friday's statement demonstrate Wood's ability and need to control and manipulate the situation. The timing of it shows that he's as vindictive as ever.

"This is all about the next step," Mark Steinberg, Woods' agent, told The Associated Press. "He's looking forward to it."

But what Steinberg doesn't address is just how big a circus the next event will be. He also doesn't offer any clues as to why Friday's statement can't wait until Monday. Or the start of whatever tournament will mark Woods' return. Speculate about what he might announce and it's hard to imagine anything so urgent it has to be revealed Friday. Is he retiring? Taking 2010 off? Returning for the Masters? Hopping a Saturday flight to Kuala Lumpur to prepare for the Malaysian Open and life on the European Tour?

Something here stinks, and I'm certainly not the only one who smells it.

"It's selfish," Ernie Els told Golfweek magazine. "You can write that. I feel sorry for the sponsor. Mondays are a good day to make statements, not Friday. This takes a lot away from the golf tournament."

Els, of course is talking about Woods stealing whatever spotlight was on the Accenture Match Play (about a 60 watt bulb, but that's beside the point, since that's life in golf without Woods). Accenture, as you'll remember, was the first major sponsor to dump Woods. And as media members and his fellow golf pros know all too well, if you cross Woods, he'll deliver a message when the time is right.

This week, Tiger's absence in Arizona isn't enough. He's got to remind them that he's Tiger Woods, attention vacuum, and if they don't want to be associated with him (and write him a nice big check for the privilege) then he's got no problem wiping their event right off the map. Remember, he's Tiger Woods.

Els wasn't the only Match Play competitor thinking that way.

"He's got to come out at some point," Rory McIlroy told Golfweek. "I suppose he might want to get something back against the sponsor that dropped him."

PGA Tour Commissioner Tim Finchem didn't want to bite at the "revenge" notion, but then again, he's a bit more media savvy and calculating than the young phenom McIlroy.

"We have tournaments every week," Finchem told AP, suggesting that Tiger had to steal the thunder from someone's tournament, but never mentioning the fact he just so happened to pick his spurned sponsor's. "I think it's going to be a story in and of itself. A lot of people are going to be watching golf this week to see what the world of golf says about it, my guess is. So that will be a good thing."

In other words, the commish is saying, "Tiger Woods is my paycheck and everyone else's on Tour, and if you think I'm stupid enough to say anything to incur his wrath, I never would have gotten a job like this."

But leave it to McIlroy to skip the PR seminar and tell it like it is.

"It just went on for so long," McIlroy continued. "I'm sick of hearing about it. And I'm just looking forward to when he's getting back on the golf course."

And McIlroy is right. It will be good to have Woods back, where we can marvel at his mind-boggling talent on the course, and try to forget how big a jerk he is off of it.

Discussion

  1. I couldn't care less about Tiger off the golf course. But then again, I never assumed he was a good guy because he was good at golf. If you were suckered into that, oops.

    I couldn't care less about an apology. Don't care. As a man, he owes apologies to people he actually hurt. I ain't one of 'em, nor are you.

    I'd ask Tiger two questions:

    1. When are you playing next?
    2. How's your game?

    That's it.

  2. Steve says:

    I too am very sick of the Tiger saga. Just get back on the course. I find it hilarious that he is stealing the thunder from a sponser who dropped him. IMO, awesome move on his part. I find it hard to side with multi-billion dollar corporations.

  3. Paul says:

    Ron, a very nice article you put together. Good Job! Erik, I totally agree with you 100%. The man doesn't owe me anything. I just want him back on the golf course. All these people are obsessed with the number of women and all that other garbage. I care about one number and that's 19 majors!

  4. Old Tom says:

    When you build up a wildly profitable cult of personality around an image and the Oz-like individual behind the image falls flat and you see that everything is a false-front, you can't just say, "Who cares about the fallible person, all I care is that he plays and how he plays." A sports celeb is a sports celeb first, last and always, and it's all one package. Especially here, where we never got to know Tiger as a person -- but only as a packaged image for sale everywhere.

    95% of Woods earnings came not from playing golf but from selling the public that fake image. This is about a business, not a player. An image, not a person.

    So the Woods/IMG conglomerate wants to do damage control on the image. #### 'em.

  5. Chief Broom says:

    I couldn't care less about an apology. Don't care. As a man, he owes apologies to people he actually hurt. I ain't one of 'em, nor are you.That's it.

    Tiger's reckless behavior has jeopardized the sport of golf, especially at the professional level. This could not have come at a worse time given the economic situation when every tour is struggling to remain economically viable and retain sponsors. Perhaps the PGA is in part to blame for relying so much on Tiger, so that with his fall their exposure has been greater, but IMO Tiger owes us all an apology.

    What made Tiger special was that he was supposed to have been different. Turns out he wasn't. While we the fans carry some blame for believing such a ridiculous notion, Tiger never once tried to dissuade us from that belief. Worse he encouraged it, and so his fall is important and should be remembered for the monumental folly it represents. Shakespeare couldn't have devised a fall any more bizarre nor complete...

  6. 95% of Woods earnings came not from playing golf but from selling the public that fake image. This is about a business, not a player. An image, not a person.

    I haven't bought a single product because a good golfer endorsed it. If you were fooled, well, that's on you. I also don't get where people think "Tiger's a great guy" was the advertising message at all. Every ad I've ever seen - every ad - played off Tiger's success as a dominant golfer. His family didn't appear in the ads, and I never assumed he was a good guy because he was in advertisements played off his role as a golfer. Heck, over 90% of the ads show him with a golf club or in golf attire... Gillette being perhaps one of the only ones that didn't (because he was in a towel or dressed for a night on the town - sans family).

    Tiger's reckless behavior has jeopardized the sport of golf, especially at the professional level.

    Well now that's just silly talk. Professional golf is jeopardized? Please…

    What made Tiger special was that he was supposed to have been different. Turns out he wasn't.

    14 major championships by the age of 33 and 70+ PGA Tour wins isn't different?

    I guess I'll never understand why people feel so personally injured in all of this. Why do you care so much about what some guy you've never talked to did to or with people you'll never meet?

  7. Scott Hurst says:

    I heard Tim Finchem's statements and I agree with him and will go one step farther: rather than harm Accenture, I think this helps. It puts golf back in the news, the word "Accenture" will be said about 50x more often than it otherwise would have, and people will tune in to the tournament to see what the announcers and players have to say about what Tiger will say or what he did say.

    It's not like he scheduled his press conference for 3pm on Sunday when the final match would be playing. He scheduled it for four hours before coverage starts (on Golf Channel) on a Friday.

    Sorry, Ernie (and others) - I think you're wrong on that one. Plus, there remains the possibility that Tiger needs to make the announcement on Friday for a certain reason (though I still doubt he's going to commit to the WM tournament). And look, if this is bad timing, then there probably isn't a "timing" out there that you'd consider good.

  8. Chief Broom says:

    Well now that's just silly talk. Professional golf is jeopardized? Please…

    14 major championships by the age of 33 and 70+ PGA Tour wins isn't different?
    I guess I'll never understand why people feel so personally injured in all of this. Why do you care so much about what some guy you've never talked to did to or with people you'll never meet?

    The PGA tour is financed through various means but primarily by private corporations that sponsor the various weekly tournaments. With the downturn in the economy companies are reconsidering those expenditures in light of the value added to their commercial endeavors. As the chief draw in the PGA for the last 12 or so years Tiger is the face of the PGA. Corporations desire an association with this and by default with Tiger. Tiger's behavior has hurt that relationship between the PGA and it's many sponsors. How the PGA and Tiger deal with this fiasco will in turn dictate how those sponsorship relations will continue in the future. Don't ignore the plight of the LPGA. While it is true the LPGA is turning around the PGA is not immune to the same situation. The sport of golf is bigger than Tiger, but his importance to the game can not be undersold.

    As to Tiger the man, he actively promoted himself as a role model. While you were savvy enough not to buy into that claptrap, many of us did. And we didn't do it because of his skill, or his respectful demeanor (remember how he has always doted on his parents). We did it because he typified a person coming from humble beginnings ascending to the pinnacle of his sport through hard work, dedication, and following a righteous path (don't laugh). The stories of Tiger having to put school and his education before golf, his family ties to his parents and then to his new wife and children. All of this was carefully crafted and promoted. Shame on me for believing it I suppose, but to me that made Tiger special. Here is a man who is the best there is at what he does, but he also has built a life on a foundation anyone of us can also strive to attain. We may not be able to play golf like Tiger but we can work hard, get an education, and build a life and a family that means something beyond simple self-aggrandizement. Golf is a sport peopled with men and women who have done all this, but Tiger popularized it like never before and people who would never pay attention to golf did because of his universal appeal. Now we know that all of that appeal was a lie, except for his prowess on the links. How typical. I still respect his game I just no longer respect the man...

  9. Ramon says:

    Ernie Els is a stupid prick - Tiger gives exactly the right answer to Accenture. Yeah Tiger thats the way i like it!!!! Manipulation and vindictiveness???! Your are kidding ....

    And to all the masses of hypocritical people in the USA - private matters stay private matters! Plain and simple!

  10. Frank says:

    This is a childish diatribe by a person with no standing to have an opinion. I am very disappointed with this article, its tone, and that is was allowed in this site. I have a feel for who Eric is, Ron I have no clue who you are, Eric I am really sorry to find such a childish diatribe on the site.Mr. Woods has the freedom to schedule what ever he wants when ever he wants and the press can handle it however they want. If it steals the spotlight from the Accenture tourney it is because the press will have weighted it that way.
    This article really diminishes the professionalism and gravitas this site has worked so hard to establish. Links to absurd journalism is one thing, being the source of it is just sad.

  11. As the chief draw in the PGA for the last 12 or so years Tiger is the face of the PGA.

    The stats don't really back you up. Golf's been declining in viewership for a number of years, since 1994. Yes, pre-Tiger. Besides, everyone knows the guy plays only about 15 events a year.

    Furthermore, it's far too soon to tell if this has had any impact. For all you know it could have a positive impact on television viewing. We don't know.

    And, suffice to say, "the economy" is about 100x more important to people than Tiger, and Tiger's still going to be a draw. Perhaps even more now than ever, again. We don't know. Companies still sponsor the NFL and the thug level there's a heckuva lot higher. How clean a "product" do we need to be sold Cialis anyway?

    As to Tiger the man, he actively promoted himself as a role model.

    We're going to have to agree to disagree on that. I don't think he did that at all, and I never respected "the man" because I didn't know the guy. Maybe I'm more cynical than you. :-)

    I have a feel for who Eric is, Ron I have no clue who you are.

    Frank, your comments are out of bounds. Ron's as entitled to his opinion as anyone, and as you can see from the comments above, he's not alone in sharing this opinion.

    Thrash Talk is and always has been an op/ed column. Just as you're given the opportunity to comment, the Thrash Talk columnist is given the opportunity to kick off the conversation by sharing his thoughts.

    I care only about Tiger as a golfer. Clearly, that's not the only opinion out there.

  12. Paul says:

    Some of you gentlemen on here are absolutely dilirous! If he wasn't married, he'd fall right in line with Derek Jeter. I can't believe some of the people in this world. This whole subject is way over-covered. I can name a handful of sports LEGENDS that had this exact behavior and nobody slammed them. From Wilt Chamberlain to Muhammad Ali to Mickey Mantle to Babe Ruth to Joe Namath to Kobe Bryant. Get over it people. All I care about is that he gets back to golf. Whether he mends his marriage or not is none of my business. And Erik I agree with you AGAIN. I never bought one product because Tiger uses it. I have a NIKE hat and polo, that's it. All the rest of my stuff is what I researched, tried out and now use.

  13. David says:

    I could not care less about the mans utter foolishness.Then to take it out on accenture, gives you the measure of the man? or is that spoilt brat!

    He would b
    have been better to come clean ages ago and left revenge off the menu as his wife might still take him for every penny,and she should ,if he puts a foot wrong again.

  14. Return2Golf says:

    I do not feel personally slighted by Tiger's indiscretions nor would I consider the game of golf to have been damaged in anyway. I agree - there are only 2 questions I want Tiger to answer. When are you playing next? and How is your game?

    For the people that care about answers to the other questions and are distracted from the tournament on Friday . . well that's really thier issue, not Tiger's. Perhaps the PGA and Ernie Els should be asking themselves why a 10 minute press conference should disrupt a whole day of tournament play. Could it be that watching Ernie shoot 1 under is about as fun as watching paint dry?

    Nothing against Els or the PGA and I'm not even a Tiger fan - but sounds like whining to me.

  15. Jun Doe says:

    Ummmm, why is he apologizing to the public? This society can be so hypocritical, his only apology should be to his wife and family. Furthermore I noticed the enthusiasm and rush to believe every waitress and tramp who came out the "wood"work who claimed association with Woods. If anything, the media and a judgemental society might owe him an apology instead of the other way around. He committed no crime against humanity he was not guilty of any inappropriate statements. What he did was between him and the consenting adults involved in his situation. He's a role model for his SPORT and his dedication to his craft THAT'S IT. That doesnt mean we should prop him up over the police officers, professors, doctors, and clergy who's profession truly contribute to the well being of society. LOL You guys told your kids to follow a 'GOLFER' change your role models America its you that's wrong not TIGER

  16. John taylor says:

    Tiger is publicly apoligizing and that is all and the right thing to do. He owes no one any explanation only his wife and kids. The only reason people are pissed that he won't take questions is because they want to stir the mess more and capitalize on this situation. And drag him down and kick him some more, leave him alone!

  17. Jim says:

    Tiger plays a great game, but not good enough to get a pass on what he has done to his Wife. I think all his sponsor deals should dump him. He does not have what it takes to be a man and I refuse to idolize him because he play golf well. A porn star? He could have jepordized his Wife's life. Golf could go on without him. If he has cheated this bad in the most important part of his life, I am certain he would not stop at anything to keep his game on. We have seen it many times in sports. I hope his Wife kicks him to the curb as she sure deserves better. Remember O.J.

  18. Tony says:

    Oh, boy. I don't believe there is any other subject that comes close to stirring our passions than the Tiger Woods saga. These comments are all thought provoking and entertaining! I'll tell you, however, I side with Mr. Barzeski. Eric, you are a voice of reason.

    .

  19. frobenius says:

    Looks like Accenture has no problem with the timing of it. Perhaps, Ernie spoke a little bit too prematurely.

    http://sports.espn.go.com/golf/news/story?id=4925024

  20. Steve says:

    I find it hard to side with Accenture *and* Woods, who is a corporation in his own right.

  21. Shaun says:

    I shared my opinions about this saga in the forum weeks ago and I have no desire to dredge them up again; so, I'll confine this post to my reaction to news of Woods's announcement.

    First, Woods's poor character and general lack of integrity is evident once again in his decision to make this (non-)announcement in the middle of Accenture's event. I mean, c'mon. I respect Els and McIlroy for having the courage to speak their minds, even though Woods probably won't talk to either of them again. (Haha.)

    Second, notwithstanding the first point and the fact that a premature retirement would be enormously amusing, I do hope that Woods announces that he'll be returning at least in time for the Masters.

    Third, notwithstanding that the announcement will be scripted, full of spin, manipulative and otherwise inadequate, I hope that it largely puts this story to rest. Like McIlroy, I'm over it.

  22. Slowhand says:

    I don't feel bad one bit for Accenture and neither should you. If you don't know what type of company Accenture is then read on. They are a Global Technology IT Outsourcing company. I worked for an IT company in Omaha, NE that laid off 40% of it's staff to outsource with Accenture. A year later the Accenture staff screwed up the system so bad that the company had to re-hire back many employees. On a more positive note many of the former employees went on to better jobs and declined the offer back. You go Tiger! Torpedo that joint venture between the Omaha company and Accenture!!

  23. allin says:

    It is traditional in PR circles to release bad news on FRidays, people personal time is a priority it is belived thay many pay less attention over the weekend.

    The fact that Tigers actions may or may not hurt golf in general as a factor in his apology overstates his personal responsibility for the sport. As long as his competetive actions are appropriate the rest is only a bypoduct and does not require apology. People he directly harmed personally or professionally, (business partners, friends and family) deserve a response, the rest of the public really isn't entitled. Like other overexposed public figures, movie star and rock star drug addicts, etc any public apology is to retain or recover public support because of the money that public spends affects them.

    If fewer people go to golf tournaments, tune in on TV or purchase Nike products, the golf industry may be better in the long run as it will be forced to market itself on the merits of its tournaments, presentation and product. In my opinion this especially benefits avid golfers.

  24. Shaun says:

    Whoa, Frank! This site's about golf. No-one here has any "standing" to make any comments about the sport; I'm not even sure what that means, but, fortunately, it's neither relevant nor required.

  25. chalky says:

    Can the media explain to me why they are letting Woods and his minions manipulate you. I mean, you are looking like his lapdogs or worse bootlickers. Have you no pride???
    If you disagree simply look at the optics. Pretty clear is'nt it.

  26. teeitup says:

    I don't know if his wife has spoken or not. What if his trysts were okay with her, as long as they were not made public?

    Could some of these women who have come out of the woodwork be lying? Could some have been with him before he got married? In the end many people are passing a whole lot of judgment on a man and woman they have never met, and only heard about through other people - other people they haven't met either.

    He's a golfer, not Jesus. He's not a role model for anything other than a good swing and an obscene winning percentage. He allows behemoth corporations to attach themselves to him in order to make money, his presence makes untold numbers of people money. I played golf once with his manager's father, lets just say no one really gets what it is like to be him: he has to employ people to deal with all the crap he is sent to endorse, wear, sell etc. because the volume is overwhelming.

  27. Troglodyte says:

    It's not about what you think or feel or believe. Because while you deem yourself inured to the hype, millions more were not. While you forgave or excused or bemoaned all his cursing and club throwing the rest of the world watched and took it in. What Tiger did goes far beyond feelings or beliefs. Tiger made millions and millions of dollars portraying himself to be something he was patently not. There are probably those who bought the idea that Tiger was showing all the white people of the world that golf was meant for everyone.

    But here's what he did: He tried to out-Michael Michael Jordan in womanizing and keeping the media at bay. Jordan was successful. Eldrick was not. Because he was not he brought the wrath of the paparazzi upon his life. Having done so he diminished every shred of value and worth golf and its tradition of values had established over more than a century. Nice going, Tiger.

    It would be nice to suppose that Tiger could be defined solely by his exploits on the course. But once he accepted all those millions of dollars to portray the perfect human being, he became part of our culture. The culture is now judging him and judging him, appropriately, quite harshly.

    As an old guy, here's my take: Whatever Arnold Palmer (himself a womanizer, but a very, very discreet one in a different age (see Mad Men) did do to make golf more than hockey in the American consciousness, Tiger is in the throes of undoing. All the First Tee initiatives. All the hopes that he would make the game more universal are over. He let down the game in a big way. Because he was more than what he did between the ropes.

    He always deflected the idea that he was the great African-American reformer of professional golf given his multi-ethnic background. But, of course, that was never the perception and, thus, the reality. He is black. And his peccadilloes have only served to reinforce every stereotype associated with African-Americans. Of course, nobody can suggest such a thing in this day and age.

    I would suggest that the Tiger Woods saga of the last three months transcends how well he plays golf and how much anyone enjoys him doing so. His sins go beyond cheating on his wife. He cheated on the people paying him millions of dollars and, far more importantly, the people who believed him to be special.

    All things considered, in my life, I've been hustled by better human beings on every golf course I've ever played.

    I don't know what he's going to say tomorrow. But with a background in PR I can promise you it's BS.

  28. senorchipotle says:

    Tiger's reckless behavior has jeopardized the sport of golf, especially at the professional level. This could not have come at a worse time given the economic situation when every tour is struggling to remain economically viable and retain sponsors. Perhaps the PGA is in part to blame for relying so much on Tiger, so that with his fall their exposure has been greater, but IMO Tiger owes us all an apology.

    What made Tiger special was that he was supposed to have been different. Turns out he wasn't. While we the fans carry some blame for believing such a ridiculous notion, Tiger never once tried to dissuade us from that belief. Worse he encouraged it, and so his fall is important and should be remembered for the monumental folly it represents. Shakespeare couldn't have devised a fall any more bizarre nor complete...

    Oh come off it. Tiger's behavior had nothing to do with the game of golf. "Economically viable," I'm seriously lmao right now. The second round losers make as much as I do in a year, in four days. I could give a damn about whether or not these guys have a tourney to go to every weekend. I love the game of golf, I enjoy watching pros play, there's a difference. Golf will always be there.

    Tiger never led you to believe anything. He never told you about his life, you just assumed. Does your banker tell you about his life? So what, he's got a picture of his kids on his desk. For all you know he's banging his secretary, but he's not gonna tell you that, now is he?

    And if you think 'speare couldn't have devised a better tragedy, you've never read Shakespeare.

  29. Doc says:

    You can separate the sin from the sinner but if there's no remorse, this person is what he does. He may be a great golfer but as a man, he's a poor one (you can probably thank Earl for that one). And isn't golf a game of integrity? What it sounds like is many think because he's a philanderer it's OK. If he were a murderer, a theif or IV drug user, I don't think you'd be welcoming him back with open arms. For the record, I would like to see him straighten his life out and somehow turn this mess into something positive. Help others learn from his grievous mistakes.

  30. Paul says:

    Holy Cow Troglodyte... Racist much? I'm only going to say one thing. Blame yourself for whatever YOU bought into. He was sponsored by a watch company, consulting firm, Gilette, AT&T, Gatorade and Nike. Just point me in the direction of which advertisement or commercial where Tiger was portrayed as this wholesome, good guy-family and I might buy into your point. But he never was. His success on the golf course was the focal point of all his sponsors. Get your act right... dude!

  31. Complaining about it being a controlled environment is just kinda silly to me. I'd do the exact same thing. Why put yourself into situations where the risk is exponentially higher for something bad to happen? We've seen Tiger's temper in action. After all that's happened, can you imagine how much worse it would be if someone from TMZ were allowed to ask a question that ended up provoking him? I'm not trying to say the guy is some sort of caged animal by any means, but everyone has their breaking points, regardless of how much money they're worth. And this is a guy that has had his world turned upside down in the last 3 months. I'd probably be pretty cranky and have a short fuse too. So like I said, if you know that's your state of mind, why would you put yourself in a situation where something bad could happen?

    As for the timing, lets say that Phil Mickelson gets caught doing something stupid. I dunno, pick anything... for arguments sake, lets say he gets caught playing around behind Amy's back (I'm not saying this is the case, this is all purely hypothetical). KPMG then decides to drop him. You don't think Phil would pass up the opporunity to take the spotlight away from an event they sponsored?? Even after he sports that Callaway/KPMG hat every single week and gives them loads of exposure everytime he plays??

    Personally, I don't think he owes me an apology. I'd be perfectly happy if he came out to the podium and said "I'm playing in two weeks. See ya there!" and that's it. If I were in his shoes, it would be hard to talk me out of doing that exact thing. I'm telling ya, if you think he's a jerk, I'd hate to see how people would perceive me if I were on that level. I'd probably reach historical levels, maybe even equivalent to Ty Cobb. I'm normally a nice guy, but when it comes to competition and work, I'm all business. I'm not trying to say that I'm on Tiger's level by any means, or that I know what kind of pressure he faces, but I do feel like on a very basic level it does translate.

  32. Jorge says:

    I wonder when the, "Leave Tiger Alone" video from a mega fan is gonna hit YouTube....

  33. Simpleton says:

    Paul, if "His success on the golf course was the focal point of all his sponsors", then why are they dropping him now? Is he not still considered the best golfer in the world?

    A celebrities image is not solely based on the commercials they do (unless they are endorsing strip clubs). Are you telling us that Tiger Woods did not have a wholesome, good family-guy image fostered by the obvious relationship he had with his parents, wife and children and also by the lack of negative publicity that usually follows most A-list celebrities? If so, trust me, you are in the minority.

  34. Scott Hurst says:

    Paul, if "His success on the golf course was the focal point of all his sponsors", then why are they dropping him now? Is he not still considered the best golfer in the world?

    Ha, I'll take this one (because it's easy).

    Pre-Thanksgiving: when you heard the name "Tiger Woods" you thought "hard work, awesome, greatness, best in the world."

    Post-Thanksgiving: when you heard the name "Tiger Woods," suffice to say you didn't think those things.

    A few (two, right?) sponsors dropped Tiger because he was no longer associated with greatness. He's still the best golfer in the world, but that's not what people think of right now.

    It's really very simple.

  35. Doc says:

    A few (two, right?) sponsors dropped Tiger because he was no longer associated with greatness. He's still the best golfer in the world, but that's not what people think of right now.

    The other thing is this; with the economy being what it is these days, this was a convenient excuse to cut some of their ad budgets.

  36. senorchipotle says:

    He always deflected the idea that he was the great African-American reformer of professional golf given his multi-ethnic background. But, of course, that was never the perception and, thus, the reality. He is black. And his peccadilloes have only served to reinforce every stereotype associated with African-Americans. Of course, nobody can suggest such a thing in this day and age.

    ... and exactly what might those stereotypes of ''african-americans'' be?

  37. Josh says:

    Doesn't an article such as this seem a bit ridiculous now that we know why the timing was when it was. Doesn't the article seem a bit mean spirited when we heard what Tiger had to say?

    I think so.

  38. Chief Broom says:

    Tiger said what he had to say. I'm encouraged by it in that the reality is he'll have to earn back the respect of his peers and fans. I'm also encouraged by the fact that he isn't rushing back into competative golf. He needs to heal, and not just his many shattered relationships, but himself. You don't engage in self-destructive behavior like that when you are a happy and fulfilled person. Hopefully he realizes that ture happiness can't be found in any one place (the golf course, between a woman's legs, etc.), but rather in a life lead through moderation and meaningful relationships. I wish him the best. I've always been a Tiger fan. Maybe that's why this has hit me so hard? But as a true fan I'm hopeful that he can come through this a better person.

  39. thegolfstudent.com says:

    I have to say that the press conference looked WAY to rigid. Reading all the PC lines, hugging his mom, teary eyed, oh so sad. The direct looking at the camera to slow read certain parts, it just looked so rehearsed and moreover insincere. I agree with what some writers have already said. What is off the course matters not to me. UNTIL you make it a big deal, then it is of interest since there might be something to hide there. I firmly believe that the only reason this issue is dragging out is because of the slow spinning that is going off by the Tiger camp. Lets end the drama, admit the personal crap and get back to doing what you do best. Play the game. Tiger is shamed, yes he is but we all like to watch his amazing golf, hate the guy personally okay, but respect his game.

  40. Ron Varrial says:

    Interesting day. We all expected Tiger to apologize and I felt it was sincere. He also very clearly stated that he understands he's been a role model to many (didn't weigh in on whether or not that was a good idea or not) and apologized to parents and fans. As he talked about his parents and the values he was raised with, I definitely thought about some of the comments here about us all being sold a bill of goods regarding his image.

    At the end of the day, I come away feeling best about the fact he admitted and apologized for thinking that he's entitled and that rules don't apply to him. It's one thing for us to say that about him but it's refreshing to hear him acknowledge it and take responsibility. It was one of the only surprises of the statement.

    I've long said that Tiger could emerge from this because everyone loves a redemption story, and this could humanize him in a way nothing else could.

    The fact he didn't announce a comeback or anything does tell me that this was a "step" in his rehab and I'm still not sure why it had to be this morning (and Faldo and Nobilo asked the same thing in their comments following the statement), because even if he's going back to rehab, there had to be other options, unless he's hopping a flight to Asia for a crash course in Buddhism or something.

    I'll also cut him a break on the media limitations. This wasn't a press conference, it was a speech and I figure that when he does come back, then he'll have to face questions. But since all he really did today was apologize and remains off the radar, I can't get too worked up over that.

    Overall, I think he accomplished what he had to in order to take another step forward.

  41. WuTiger says:

    I look at this from many directions, and have different feelings from each vector.

    First, I have my views as a former journalist. Tiger is a public figure - he has sought the limelight and benefitted from it. On the other hand, he is NOT an elected public official who owes specific things to his constituency. He should expect to have his actions exposed, but how much is he required to "bare his soul" to everyone?

    Related to this is the fact that he does want to protect his wife and children from media hounding. The junk journalists and papparazzi used to irritate me. Tiger evidently has short-circuited the papparazzi by allowing softie photos of himself and family members to be taken by some company which provides "stock footage" to media outlets.

    Then there's the spiritual angle. I'm a struggling Christian, and one of the challenges is realizing that humans are flawed, whether they strive for higher behavior through Christianity, Buddhism or other religions/ moral codes. Even if his marriage holds together, the worst punishment will be as he truly realizes the pain and suffering he caused to his wife, children, mother, family, and economically challenged yourngsters who looked up to him as a role model. While we don't condone such behavior, most religions/moral codes urge us to forgive errant persons who make an honest effort to reform themselves.

    Then, there's the issue of cosmic materiality (or whatever...) This afternoon, reservists of 3d Battalion, 24th Marines just arrived back home here in St. Louis - the last U.S. combat unit serving in Iraq. Right now, 850 miles east of Iraq in southern Afghanistan, the 6th Marine Regiment is slugging it out with Taliban fighters in the town of Marjah. Some of the Marines are suffering from frostbite at night because they left heavy sleeping bags behind so they could carry in more ammunition for a battle at the end of shaky supply lines. These Marines are expected to clear out a major Taliban stronghold while causing minimal civilian casualties.

    Back here in the USA, we're upset because the snow is delaying our spring tee off, and Tiger might not play in the Masters.

    Sand Trappers, I'm not trying to "beat up" on our community with these prior paragraphs. I'm just sharing different things that went through my head on L'Affaire Tiger.

    ----------------
    Chief Broom - Kudos to you for your service to our country.
    ----------------

  42. The Oracle says:

    "Let he who is without sin, cast the first stone". And to refresh your memory: Accenture, formerly Arthur Andersen, was convicted on June 15, 2002, of obstruction of justice for shredding documents related to its audit of Enron, resulting in the Enron scandal. What an example of clean and honest behaviour!

    Yeah, it's the Tiger way, sweet revenge, and it's just beginning ...

  43. bobsuruncle says:

    enough already...give the guy a break. what exactly do you want from him? to get down on his knees and kiss your shoes? let it go man...

  44. Frank says:

    Interesting day. We all expected Tiger to apologize and I felt it was sincere. He also very clearly stated that he understands he's been a role model to many (didn't weigh in on whether or not that was a good idea or not) and apologized to parents and fans. As he talked about his parents and the values he was raised with, I definitely thought about some of the comments here about us all being sold a bill of goods regarding his image.

    At the end of the day, I come away feeling best about the fact he admitted and apologized for thinking that he's entitled and that rules don't apply to him. It's one thing for us to say that about him but it's refreshing to hear him acknowledge it and take responsibility. It was one of the only surprises of the statement.

    I've long said that Tiger could emerge from this because everyone loves a redemption story, and this could humanize him in a way nothing else could.

    The fact he didn't announce a comeback or anything does tell me that this was a "step" in his rehab and I'm still not sure why it had to be this morning (and Faldo and Nobilo asked the same thing in their comments following the statement), because even if he's going back to rehab, there had to be other options, unless he's hopping a flight to Asia for a crash course in Buddhism or something.

    I'll also cut him a break on the media limitations. This wasn't a press conference, it was a speech and I figure that when he does come back, then he'll have to face questions. But since all he really did today was apologize and remains off the radar, I can't get too worked up over that.

    Overall, I think he accomplished what he had to in order to take another step forward.

    So was there an apology in your post for the inciting yellow journalistic comments in your headline? I guess I failed to recognize the "political Cartoon" aspect of "Thrash Talk" and it's function to use "Editorial License" to entreat a reader, so according to Erik I owe you a pass... here's your pass. I thought Tiger apologized to exactly who he should apologize to, a room full off employees and close associates who he DID let down on a personal level; and some whose livelihood he has jeopardized. He also knew any statement would become leaked so he allowed we voyeurs of his life to be privy to what he said.

    Well done Tiger, sounds like you do have your priorities figured out, good luck and God's speed.

  45. Tom says:

    If Tiger owes only Elin and his family an apology then why did he feel the need to air out his message on National Television?

    Also, Tiger may not have hurt anyone directly in this forum, but many of his fans feel absolutely positively lied to. You can sense that Tiger knows this too, otherwise he wouldn't have felt the need to ask everyone to "one day believe in me again".

    Finally, a sticking point. I would argue that Tiger did in fact portray himself as a devoted family man and that this played a part in earning him larger endorsement deals than he could have gotten a single man.

    How so?

    How about the stories of being told often by his mother to faithfully do his homework or face a day without golf. How about the many constant references to his father's devotion to him and to his admiration of his father. Or how about the carefully released family pictures to the media.

    To see it all tarnished must be truly humbling for him. At least one would hope so.

  46. RON says:

    TIGER WOODS DON'T OWE ANYONE APOLOGY EXCEPT HIS WIFE, I'LL BE GLADED WHEN HE RETURN AND GOOD AGAIN.

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