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Posts by Stacey_E

I find a LOT of useful information at the manufacturers' websites.  You can get right down to the nitty gritty on lie angle, shaft length and weight, cubic centimeters.....etc
A 10.5* adjustable driver can be taken from 9.5 to 11.5 degrees.  I'd say that (with shaft matching) covers 90+% of amateur golfers.  You could have a 9.5* X-flex shaft or 11.5* senior flex for the golden years.  All of this would be at your disposal with a wrench and possible shaft change.   Seriously, 10.5* in a "stiff" factory OEM shaft and adjustable head is an excellent combo for anybody.
Mizuno MX700 is an absolute sleeper club that can be had on the cheap.  This club didn't take off because a lot of Mizuno fans are lower or aspiring to be lower handicaps.  I carried one for two years and it has one hot face, high launch and low spin.  I'd strongly recommend it to any handicap over 5.  Go with a stiffer flex than you normally use because the standard shaft is a tad floppy and the head launches relatively high for the loft on the sole.   Honorable...
I'd say try some online fitting stuff through Ping, Titleist, Cobra etc.  Be really REALLY honest about your distances and you should get in the ball park.  These don't take into account tempo, lag, lie angles and such like a true dynamic fitting would.  They should get you a general consensus.  If you are fitting for a driver it is obviously more complicated.  Id also try some demo clubs at a local range or course.  You will know what feels right and what launches the...
I personally like matching wedges in the clubs you tend to take full swings on.  For me that is the pitching wedge as I cant remember ever taking a greenside shot with it. I have had and liked matching gap, sand and lob wedges. They are more forgiving on full shots and often have a wide bounce that plays well out of thick grass and sand. That being said, I feel I have a lot more touch with more blade like wedges.  I use the 52* on any greenside shot that I can, and my...
I actually bought a "BY YOU" and I have to say it was a VERY consistant shaft.  It also had a good feel to it, tight and snappy at impact.  It was so consistant that I finally realized that I have a pretty big delofting move with my driver.  So I traded the FT9 with the original Axis shaft and the By You shaft for a R9 Super Tri 11.5* and R9 5 wood.  I couldnt be happier with either of those clubs.  I've never been able to dial a driver in so quickly.  The 5 wood was...
I would say any of the major 5 or 6 brands are a safe bet as long as the shafts are fitted to your needs.  Clubhead construction is important too.  Most opt for a more forgiving head (like the S2) if they cant get out to play a lot, and a more traditional blade style if they are looking to work and improve.  You can usually get a large portion of your investment back if you shop carefully and buy slightly used clubs (from a major manufacturer) - that is if you decide to...
Lets do the math.  6-gw is 6 clubs.  Each shaft will cost you $10 minimum for steel plus $5 minimum for the grip.  A shaft pull and replace around here will run you about $10 per club.  A lie adjustment will cost you about $5 per club.  Add that all up and you are looking at about $30 per club x 6 clubs is $180.  This does not take into account the fact that your club heads are weighted for graphite regular length shafts (if I read your current set up correctly). ...
Another one I need to check out.  I know lots of advice out there says to go for carry distance in your setup.  I do like having a low trajectory at times.  Its nice to see a cut shot get on the ground and start rolling out instead of a high hanging cut that turns into a slice.  My preference is to have all three trajectories available when I need them.  I once had a KZG 325cc driver that I could hit on any trajectory just by tee height.  With the 460cc drivers, it seems...
Thanks for the advice newtogolf!  I'll do a little on line research on all those shafts.
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