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Posts by Open-Faced Club Sandwedge

I agree; with a proper spine tilt you're probably not flexible enough to overswing the way you do.   Practice with a club across the front of your shoulders, handle facing left, crossing your arms on your chest to hold the club in place.  Take a stance and a "backswing" (obviously you're moving everything but your arms in this position), and you'll be able to see the handle of the club rotate due to your spine rotation.  You want to see the handle rotate downwards; not...
Something to keep in mind is that if you're swinging on an ideal path (many instructors try to teach a mild in-to-out path), then a slightly closed club face will be a pull-hook, and a slightly open club face will be a straight push.  A club face that's "just right" (very slightly open to the target; very slight closed to the swing path) will produce that mild push-draw you're looking for.  So the pull-hook and the push are two sides of the same coin, and that coin is...
You're very flat in the shoulder plane at the top of the backswing.  Very flat.  This means your swing begins its rotation swinging out (like a baseball bat) rather than down into the slot (like a golf club).  If you picture an on-plane swing, and rotate that plane upward just one inch, so that it's one inch closer to a baseball bat swinging through the strike zone, then you've moved the hosel to where the ball is.  Shankaroo.   Get the axis tilt fixed.  There's much...
I bought one of these sets with overly-strong lofts, but it came with GW included, and I stopped using the 4i (I have a hybrid for that instead).  So basically you could just subtract one from the number on each club, and it's a set with more traditional lofts.  I have a fast swing, so I hit the ball high with all my irons, so it works well for me.   -Andrew
Take my advice with a grain of salt: I'm one of those golfers who's "not even as good as you".  Also, I haven't seen your swing, making me extra-underqualified to give you this advice.  But, since you asked:   Move the ball a little further forward in your stance.  If that was the only change you made, you'd hit the ball fat all the time, but since we tend to hit the ball (the natural athletic tendency to find the ball despite our various swing flaws), you'll probably...
A very large divot could mean you're coming in too steep, which isn't a problem when you hit the sweet spot, but it gives you less margin of error; the steeper the descent of the club, the fatter a shot is where the arc is 1 inch too far back, and the thinner a shot is where the arc is 1 inch too far forward.   How deep are your divots?  Depth may be more telling than size, which may be more of a function of turf hardness.   -Andrew
I think the evidence (his record) shows that the swing that gave him the best chance of winning was the Woods swing, with which he used to dominate the planet (golf-wise).  Mechanically imperfect though it may have been, he was magical with it.  Now he's not.  Is such backwards progress justified by the idea that one swing methodology is more correct than another; the idea that the greatest golfer on the planet could somehow be even greater with someone else's swing? ...
If you hit your irons and hybrids well, and they draw, then that says good things about your swing.  The fact that you get push-fades with your longer clubs probably means you're swinging similarly, but just leaving the face open.   Remember that it's a lot easier to close the face on the shorter clubs.  It's easier to get the arms through for a good release, and it's easier to turn the clubs with your hands (which you shouldn't consciously be doing, but your hands...
If you have the ball sitting down on fairway-tight grass, the divot shouldn't be very far in front.    Why worry about it, though? Pay attention to feel.  Your hands know it when the contact is thin.  You want a shot where it feels sweet and the divot is in front of the ball.  If those two things are happening, it shouldn't matter how far in front.   -Andrew
If you click pause quickly enough, there's a frame where you're nearly at impact, the club being still about parallel with the ground on its way to the ball.  In that frame, to my eyes it looks like your body's in a very good position, but your club head is outside your hands.  That's why you fade.   As far as what causes it to get outside on the way down, I'm not so sure.  Slow motion would make it easier to tell.  My first thought is that you quit your hip slide a...
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