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Posts by Ignorant

 You do have a point there. Some players get nervous as soon as they even see a referee, then again some do not. This is just something they need to learn when competing. If they fall behind a referee is expected to show up at some point, and if they cannot pick up pace they will be re-visited by a referee again. Riding close is just a term. Once 'escorting' a group the referee should remain out of direct sight as much as possible but close enough to be able to help them....
 The way I see it, who gets rewarded are the players in the following groups as they do not need to wait all the time for the preceding group in trouble. Afa D34-2/3 is concerned this practice is very much consistent with it when you think of it. That Dec does not say that a referee must prevent all players from breaching a Rule but only those he can see being about to do it. Same thing with a slow group, they are ones in need of assistance. It goes without saying that if...
 This is exactly what we do as well. Acting as forecaddie, helping the players to find their balls, riding close to them putting a bit of pressure... and it works, most of the time.
 I do not want to get into the debate which system is superior, however, we have only two (2) appointed referees on each standard competition on the National Tour and we do not use the system you describe above. We have a PoP chart for each group but we are only concerned about the groups falling behind for no apparent reason. Also when falling behind for good reasons such as searching for balls we encourage them to move on. If they cannot catch the preceding group we may...
D8-1/2:   Exchanging Distance Information Information regarding the distance between two objects is public information and not advice. It is therefore permissible for players to exchange information relating to the distance between two objects. For example, a player may ask anyone, including his opponent, fellow-competitor or either of their caddies, the distance between his ball and the hole.     This decision does not say how the distance information has been...
 This time issue seems to vary a lot around the world and tours. LET uses that 50/40 sec principle which is the same as USGA guideline. PGA Tour seems to give 40 sec and additional 20 sec under certain circumstances ( http://www.pgatour.com/tourreport/2013/04/12/pace-of-play-rules-for-PGA-TOUR-and-Masters.html ). Then there are practices where the time is constant (40 sec) but the extra time for the first player in turn is allowed by the referee's interpretation when it is...
 Thanks for the info, John.
  Well, at least one clerk at USGA has spoken :) All in all, in my mind use of a laser pointer does not seem to be in breach of the principle behind R8-2 as it does not leave any mark on the green. Thus I would not disagree with the USGA clerk ;-)
 I disagree with you but that is most likely in vain, as you delete all posts/lines that you do not like. Just as in my post #44. I cannot help wondering why you did that.
Let's take an alignment rod as an example. You can stick your club in the ground and line up your swing while waiting the group ahead and that is perfectly allowed. But if you do the same thing with an alignment rod you are DQ'd. So the key issue is not whether you may achieve the same outcome with your normal equipment and with an unusual equipment, even though personally I would love to see Rules written that way.When you come to think of it, you are able to indicate the...
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