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Posts by WUTiger

 Some 400 miles to the south, we're snowy in St. Louis. Hit a few shots for me! 
When getting new wedges. one thing to consider is the distance gap between your PW - normally from your iron set - and the specialty wedges (Gap, Sand and Lob).   I played a X20 Tour irons, and found I hit the 46* PW with a 35.5" long shaft about 120 yards. I looked at Cleveland CG14 wedges, and found that both GWs had 35.5" shafts, same length as PW.   Initially I tried the 52* thinking I needed more loft separation because shaft length was the same. But, the 52* only...
It's more of a matter you don't want "too much spin" off of wedges or short irons. A couple of years before the 2010 "grooves rule" took effect, I played with stronger golfers who had this problem. If they really juiced the ball with a scoring club, they would fly it in a little past the flagstick, and watch it back up 10 yards. If they hit a downslope, they could back it clear off the green. But, these guys had clubhead speed of 100+ MPH with their drivers. I don't think...
I get a 250 yd. drive about once a nine, so it would be iffy hitting a driver. So, I probably would lay up short of the traps with a 7W or a 4H.   The next shot depends on how I'm hitting my wedges. Pressing up inside the 100 yd. line with a 4W leaves me with a 3/4 PW or GW, hopefully from right side of fairway.   But, some weeks I have distance control problems with the 3/4 wedges. If 3/4 wedge is iffy, I would hit a 6i, laying up about 120 yds. out to set up a full...
Excellent condition for $40: Original Big Bertha Hawkeye 3W, w/ Hawkeye UL Regular flex shaft. Recently regripped with midsize Golf Pride New Decade Multi-Compound grip.   It has titanium head. Will try it out, have option to buy matching 5W and 7W, also excellent condition.   (Original owner had 3W, 5W and 7W - in both Firm and Regular flex shafts. He kept R-flex versions as backups - recently traded in for new FWs.)
I played the MacGregor MT (1972) "flatsole" irons from 1974 to 1994. Stiff shafts.   The clubfitter for my replacement set said I should keep the MT irons for historic purposes. I'm glad I did. Young players today like challenge of trying to hit the MT's  2 iron.
A caution from GolfWorks school: avoid extending a shaft more than 1 inch - with too long an extension, you risk creating a shear point at the junction of shaft and extension.   (Exception: putter shafts)
 Royal Precision came up with Frequency Coefficient Matching back in the early 2000s.Anyway, Royal Precision pegged is original Rifle shaft as FCM for regular = 5.0, and stiff = 6.0. But, RP scrambled things up when their Project X came out, and the PX 5.0 (Regular) actually had FCM = 5.5, and PX 6.0 had FCM =6.5. For Dynamic Gold, the R300 FCM = 4.8, and the S300 FCM = 5.8. (DG shafts, however, are about 10 grams heavier than PX counterparts). (History note: Royal...
Some of the Callaway fairway woods from the original Big Bertha and BB Warbird models had graphite shafts listed as Firm.   As per newtogolf and teamroper60, Firm falls between Regular and Stiff.   In steel shafts for irons, the Uniflex would be called Firm.
 John Brodie is an unusual case. Brodie actually played on the Stanford University golf team, not just the football team.http://www.usga.org/news/2014/January/John-Brodie--From-the-NFL-to-Pro-Golf/ Also, Jack Nicklaus was offered athletic scholarships to The Ohio State University in both golf and basketball. He chose golf. iacas noted the hockey and baseball had lots of similarities to golf. And, an excellent local teaching pro played varsity baseball in college. Another...
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