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Posts by Fatphil

what tee's did you play @ Crandon?
we are starting to do a lot of business in Vietnam....I have no idea if there are any decent courses there...lets see!
I think you are a bit ahead of yourself worrying about upswing or square.  The critical part of putting is hitting the sweet spot.  To do that there are two or three angles between the shaft, club head, hands and wrists that need to be maintained without so much as a millimeter of movement.    Once you get that down you may want to delve into the lie & loft of your putter.  If you hands and wrists are flopping around like spagetti you will never have the same stroke...
the cupped trailing hand and the pronated lead hand is the classic move.  The point that you make the move is difficult to learn and is a very individual action.  Dustin Johnson does it at the top, Boo Weekly makes it at transition, Phil and Freddy tend to make it just prior to impact.  To learn what works for you on an individual basis is not easy.  When it works its awesome, but the next weekend ya can't remember what the hell you did.  As Johnny Miller says...WOOD...
just an observation more than a solution, but I've never seen a bad golfer shank...so ya got that goin for ya!!  most poor golfers hit it more on the toe.    when I shank I usually am holding the angle OK and coming into the ball on an OK plane but my hands seem to move a bit outward...doesnt take much, only a inch or two.  usually when I am not warmed up and my upper body is tight, causes my hands to wander a bit outside. what ya need to resist doing is falling away...
  dont confuse mechanics with form.  you can have an open stance, close stance, or stand on your head with a finger in your nose,,,that is form...mechanics is returning the ball to the sweet spot EVERY time with the club face pointing in the same direction as address and the lie & loft angles the same as address.  If you hit the sweet spot, and all your angles match up, your distance control issues will disappear.  Once you get that down, if you have directional problems,...
don't beat yourself up too much...the pitch shot is difficult because the margin of error is much less than hitting a big 460cc driver off a tee into a wide open fairway.  A pitch requires you to make a proper golf swing to a very defined target.  Just because its a short shot does not mean that it's easier to execute.  Take your wedge to the chipping green (grass NOT mats) with a few hundred balls a couple of times a week...within 6 months time you will learn more about...
I think almost every component of the full swing is evident in a 40' lob wedge from a tight lie.  You are swinging slower and contact needs to be precise, any flaw becomes embarrasingly evident. 
I would say the longer you go without lessons or practice the less likley you will get to scratch.  You will simply ingrain poor habits making it more difficult to undo them 
  glad you called shenanigans Gerald, I didn't feel like doin the math.                  
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