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Posts by PooN

The most accurate answer is this: it's golf.    What you had for breakfast on April 24th, 1999 dictates if you will hit fat or thin shots today.  When Saturn is in the lower quadrant of the northern hemisphere you will hit 14 GIR. If there is a blood moon you will miss every fairway for 3 days fore and aft. Never, and I repeat, NEVER swing a golf club on February 29th of a leap year.
That's not entirely true.  I would say for any non-scratch golfer you are going to have a larger percentage of two-putting the majority of your approach shots. A lower handicapper will have a greater percentage of one-putts from just off the green.
Kind of what I'm talking about... if you are a low handicapper you are not slicing/hooking your shots OB.  Even if you are not having a great ballstriking day, you are generally getting the ball down the length of the fairway and close to the greens.  Having a good short game to get you close to the hole when you are around the greens and in the hole when you are 4-8 feet away will most certainly be saving your pars and bogeys.  Higher handicappers don't have enough...
I still feel like you will shave off more strokes in a round by gearing up your chipping/pitching.  If you can get up and down more you will shave strokes.    As a high single handicap I could miss nearly every GIR and still shoot a decent round (high-70's/low 80's) if my short game is getting me close and I am draining the 4-8 footers.  That is assuming my driver and irons are staying in play... maybe not in the fairway and on the green, but not OB or in the hazards...
I think I would disagree with this a bit.  I think 15+ handicappers might benefit from this since putting the ball in play is a bit more critical in the early stage of one's golf game.    I think once you get your full swing at least a bit under control you may want to look more at a 45/40/15 ratio.  I spend about an hour on chipping/pitching, 15 minutes on putting, then go spend about an hour on full swing when I hit the range and I feel like I am right where I should...
Somewhere between 77 and 97.    It all depends on how I'm striking the ball and if I can get the rock to drop.  I shoot for two putt on every hole and work backwards from there, so when I hit a bad drive, I mentally tell myself I should accept bogey (poor drive, drop, approach, putt, putt).  If I hit one OB and have to take stroke & distance, I tell myself I should accept double (poor drive, drop/re-tee, drive, approach, putt, putt). Likewise, if I nut a drive to center...
I'll use my 51*-7i to chip depending on carry and pin distance.  I will use my 2h or 3h to chip if I'm on the fringe or just next to it in some tightly mown 1st cut - sometimes putter if it's only just on the fringe.  51* for most pitch shots unless I need more carry then I'll open up my 56* and send her high.  So that's 7 clubs (+putter)... been doing that for 3 seasons now.  Short game has come a long way since using just the most lofted wedge!
oobgolf.com calculates mine.  It's probably not current but usually in the ballpark.
If I have enough time, yes.  On the nicer course, almost always.  Regardless, I always chip and putt on the practice green for 10 minutes or so.
Since the full swing seems to be your issue (it was mine as well when I was 20+ handicap - I could hit it far but usually far out of bounds) I would suggest you work on your fundamentals.  Grip and alignment mostly.  Then the takeaway and getting good body/shoulder turn.  But the most important thing in the golf swing IMHO is getting the club in the correct position at the top.  Learn where it needs to be and how to get it there and everything falls into place.   I took...
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