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Posts by ochmude

I very recently upgraded to new irons (Wilson Staff Di11's), and as a result of the crazy strong lofts used these days I carry a bunch of wedges now.  I used to just carry a 60* Cleveland CG15, no sand wedge, and the 48* PW from my Snake Eyes set.  Now I carry a 42.5* club that Wilson claims is a PW and a 46* club that they claim is a GW.  So since the new GW has less loft than my old PW, I now have to carry a legit 52* GW.  I also finally got around to getting a 56* SW...
It definitely takes practice.  I think I developed the ability from doing competitive pistol shooting.  Run to a position, then stop, control your breathing, relax, aim, squeeze off a shot, then run like hell to the next position and repeat the process.     
My Cleveland CG15 60*, low bounce. 
I purposefully try to feel rushed between shots.  For some reason, if I rush like a madman between shots it allows me to feel more comfortable slowing down and focusing when I'm actually standing over my ball. 
I was demoing random clubs awhile back while waiting for some work that was being done on some new clubs, and I found the Nike VR Pro hybrids to be absolutely amazing.  I arrived wanting to try out the Ping G15, but I left really wanting to add that Nike hybrid to my bag. 
Quick question that comes to mind regarding the above bold statements.  Are you required to declare the provisional and attempt to find the 1st ball, or can you immediately put the 2nd ball in play and take the penalty?  I often do so as, when my ball slices into the darkest depths of Mirkwood, it's quite obvious that it will never be found.     
Option 2 is an EXTREMELY common misconception as to how to handle a lost ball.  Your only choice is option 1.  The process would be as follows:   1. Hit tee shot into woods and lose it (1st stroke) 2. Drop from where the 1st stroke was made, so re-tee in this case (2nd stroke) 3. Hit 2nd tee shot hopefully in play (3rd) stroke   When I'm just farting around on the course for practice I will often use option 2 as you described because, well, I'm lazy and it's easier.  But...
I bought The Art of the Shortgame and really couldn't take anything at all from it.  I sincerely tried, but I just couldn't grasp the concepts being expressed in the book and translate those concepts into physical movements on my part.  I ordered Phil's DVD a couple months later and the short game is the absolute most enjoyable part of my rounds now.  If you want a preview of the DVD your library probably has a couple copies somewhere in their network and you could go...
Listen, jshots, I completely understand how contrary to the spirit of the game it seems to actually be allowed to give or receive advice while standing on the first tee.  When Sean posted this; my initial though was "Damn, good point. You got me on that one."  However, I then actually looked through the rules and decisions, and it turns out that you absolutely can do that.  It seems wrong, but it's allowed, at least it's currently allowed.  Perhaps this might be addressed...
Yes, he can, without penalty.  As Decision 8-1/18 states, Rule 8-1 only applies during the play of a round.  Decisions 2/2 and 3/3 define the precise starting point of that round.  As odd and incorrect as it may seem, there is absolutely no rule in existence which would penalize a player for giving or receiving advice prior to making a stroke on the first hole of the round.    A clearly defined starting point is essential otherwise a golf lesson that you take 24 hours...
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