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Posts by ladders11

No!   First point is that the clubs used the most are 1) putter, 2) driver,3) LW, 4) SW, and 5) PW, followed by the 3W and irons.  Good wedge players don't start leaving their wedges in the trunk because they don't need them.    Second point is that what saves strokes is getting the ball close enough to make the first putt.  Basically, this means within 15 feet to have a 10% chance, or within 6 feet to have a 50% chance.  Nobody, including pros, can get the ball within...
  I see his left wrist is flat until the club is parallel, then it hinges to the top.  He appears to come down on a different plane with lots of lag (read: hinge) and his hands turn over through impact.  I am not sure if this all is simple or imitable since he is quite a spry youth.   If you want another example, Steve Stricker: http://www.golfdigest.com/golf-instruction/swing-sequences/2010-08/photos-steve-stricker#slide=9   I know that the Pelz book talks about "dead...
My first problem with the 65-25-10 argument is that pros rely on their long games more than amateurs.  The pros expect to hit the green with their long irons and they work on this aspect of their game so they can get within 10 feet and make more birdies.  Tour pros hit 12-13 greens per round, whereas the average 10-handicapper hits 4-5.  Amateurs have many more short game shots per round and these shots make more of a difference on the scorecard.   Second problem is...
There are some awful swings at the range, especially if you go to one with putt-putt, ice cream, batting cages and go-karts.  On a busy summer night, you could roll up with a bus full of pros and it would not matter much. 
In fact the title of the book is "Golf is Not a Game of Perfect".  If you don't care at all, maybe you have gone too far.  Dial it back a bit?  In all seriousness, I second this recommendation.  Any of the Rotella books would be beneficial, he has written several.       This may be related to your setup and alignment.  The pros all have a consistent preshot routine for good reason.  If I were you, I would work on your routine and practice switching clubs at the range. ...
I do not believe in this type of retail club fitting because I think that the lie angle and swing speed are variable.  The lie angle is highly influenced by the address position which is often poor, and easily correctable.  An amateur hunched over the ball could buy a special set of irons 2 degrees flat, or have a pro walk by and say "UR DOING IT WRONG."  The sad fact is that a poor posture will hit the ball better with clubs fitted to the poor posture, but not as good...
So the benefit of the minimalist shoes is basically that they cause  pain when you take a long stride and lead with your heel.  Barefoot running and minimalist shoes force you to run differently, in a way that is healthier for your joints.   Quote from the army article [emphasis added]: "A minimalist running shoe is extremely flexible and low to the ground to create the sensation of barefoot running. By running in a shoe with minimal cushioning, most runners will...
I like the suggestion of adding a 64 degree wedge, but I think something else is wrong.   Personally, I swing smoother and slower with wedges, and try to focus on rhythm.  I don't really ever take a full backswing with my wedges, I stop with my arms at the 10:30 position.  Dave Pelz advocates this, in addition to the 9:00 and 7:30 swings, so that there are three consistent distances with each wedge.  It is helpful for me anyhow.   You also might be de-lofting...
If you ever get a chance to practice, draw a line in the sand a few inches behind where your ball would be and practice hitting that line in the sand, without the ball.  I think I got this from Pelz.  It has worked for me especially to reinforce the idea of indirect impact.   You want a U-shaped swing in most circumstances.  Skip the wedge through the sand.  Enter the sand 1-4 inches behind the ball, and make sure your divot extends 8-10 inches. Remember to...
How much time does it take to do 500 crunches?  (Is this like asking how many licks to get to the center of a tootsie pop?  Nobody knows because nobody actually gets there?)   What is the full range of motion that you perform?  I'm assuming it is a small contraction and your shoulders only move a few inches.  On the surface, I'm impressed by a number like 500 or 1000, but what is actually being done here?  Sorry, I am always a skeptic on the internet where everyone...
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