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Posts by Joe Mama

If the only cause of sending the ball to the left, or right, is the direction of the face at setup, then nobody would have a problem seeing what the face angle is and knowing what to do about it, I agree. No physics or advanced math is necessary in that case. But, as I've argued in previous posts, forearm rotation--too much, or too little, depending on the lie, is also a factor.
Golfing to me is not just about making great swings and shooting low scores. I want to know, for example, WHY the ball curves one way or the other, depending on spin direction. It's not enough for me to memorize that under-spin causes the ball to lift, for example. I needed to discover how and why the air pressure above the ball is lower than the air pressure above the ball. I enjoy thinking about these things; indeed, I will "over-think" about them until I think I...
I am a four knuckle strong grip, maintain- square- to- the -arc -as -long -as- possible golfer, it's true. I do want to roll my forearms going back or coming down. My concern with balls above or below the feet is that I have to work harder to prevent rolling in clockwise in the one case, and counter-clockwise in the other.Putting that aside, at least one forum contributor has spoken of the lie angle as being one of (if not the ONLY) culprit responsible for balls flying...
http://www.golfdigest.com/golf-instruction/2011-04/butch-harmon-uneven-lies On the web page above, Butch Harmon says that when the ball is below the feet, one's swing tends to be more upright, which fosters a delay in the closing of the club face, which in turn causes a ball flight to the right. So, aim left, he says. I've experienced the same thing with my irons many times when the ball is below my feet, and found that aiming left does, indeed help. Have other readers...
A quarter of an inch above your feet would make even less of a difference. Pick an even smaller number, and there would be virtually no difference. But, I'm not talking about half an inch; I'm talking about a difference that I thnk matters, such as, say, two inches.
You say you can prove Butch wrong. Just because he's perhaps the most successful, most respected golf coach of our generation doesn't mean he's always right. I believe you're both right, rather than you're right 100%, and he's 100% wrong. You mentioned the extreme case of a 60 degree at shoulder height. There is no doubt that the face at setup would be well closed, as you said. However, if you swing that club horizontally, you will find that the right forearm...
This quote from Butch Harmon about swinging at a ball below your feet seems to support my view that the cause of the shot to the right is in the forearms, which he says are under-rotated (counter-clockwise), while I said that I thought the forearms were in fact rotated clockwise. Under-rotating counter-clockwise amounts to the same effect as a rotation clockwise: not enough counter-clockwise forearm rotation, preventing the face from closing soon enough, causing a shot...
So, a more upright swing arc does not encourage a rolling of the forearms clockwise, in general?
I use a four-knuckle grip and never, ever, have hit the kind of shot you describe.  A strong grip keeps the face squarer to the arc longer, making it easier to return the face square to the ball at impact.
I think it is psychological.  Teeing the ball higher encourages one stand more upright in order to hit up more on the ball; the swing arc is therefore more upright, which tends to force the forearms to rotate clockwise, which opens the face and causes a slice.  It's the same effect (though not psychological in orign), I believe, as when you swing at a ball below your feet:  the swing plane tends to be somewhat higher, the face opens more, and the ball is hit to the right. ...
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