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Posts by Joe Mama

Maybe so. Maybe even probably so. But, wouldn't it all depend on which hacker is gripping then opening? Maybe the golfer's swing is not enough inside and he cannot seem to make it happen "naturally." Wouldn't gripping then opening tend to pronate the left forearm at setup and thereby foster a takeaway that's more inside? If failure to come enough inside is the cause of a lot that golfer's bad strikes, must we nevertheless advise him never to try opening and gripping,...
That's true. What DOES change is the relationship between the forearms. Opening after gripping pronates the left while supinating the right, which alters the backswing dynamics.
I like the feeling of my left thumb pointing ore along the swing arc when I grip then open. I think it helps me better gauge how much on plane my backswing is.
All comments were very helpful, and the video as well. I have been doing it wrong: gripping, then opening. If I had thought about it more carefully, I might have realized that if the grip is neutral at address--never mind whether the face is open or closed, the wrists would tend to return at impact to their positions at address, whether the face was open or closed at address. Maybe I'm wrong about this, too? Putting that aside, is there no reason why anyone would...
I've read many times that some golfers have an open face at address, but I've never read a description of how they achieve an open face. Are you supposed to place the club head on the ground, face open, THEN take your grip? Or, do you first take your grip, place the club head on the ground, and THEN open the face? Grip, then open versus open, then grip. There's a big difference, isn't there?
My mistake. It was saevel25 who posted the vector diagram below. Since you earlier had described your background in physics, I attributed the incorrect drawing (see below) to you.Of course: slide a block to the right across a table, the frictional force acting on the block points to the left. We agree completely.Slide a club face under the ball and the frictional force provided by the ball on the club face will oppose the club face's motion. By Newton's Third Law, the...
Fair enough. I respect your right not to concern yourself with things that don't interest you. I'm sure you likewise respect the right of others to wish to discuss things that are of interest to THEM. It is enough for you enough for you to know that the ball is not compressed against the ground. I hope you can understand that the engineering mentality some of us have--the need to know how and why things work--compel us to ask WHY. In this case, it was possible to...
Yes. Of course.
For readers who may have joined this thread only recently, and have read only recent posts, they may be under the impression that I am defending the proposition that golf balls are driven toward the ground following a strike by the iron. Let me say that I've never stated, nor have I ever implied in a post, that such was the case. All videos I know about do not show the so-called "pinching" or "trapping'," or compression of the ball against the ground, and I've never seen...
Place a ball on the floor and apply a sideways (tangential) force to it, perhaps by brushing along its side with your foot.Does it rotate?Does it also translate (move forward)?The frictional force on the golf ball is responsible for the torque that rotates the ball, and that force would, if there were not a competing force, cause the ball to translate (move downward). In every realistic situation involving our golf ball the competing force wins, and the ball moves upward. ...
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