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Posts by DelusionalHookr

As long as it's inside the white stakes, and not wet in a hazard, then I'm content.
Well, I use to think technology didn't make too noticeable a difference, since average scores/handicaps haven't changed much (if at all) over the past few decades -- you know, "It's the indian, not the arrow" thinking. I am, however, having my doubts. I coach a HS girls golf team, and while practicing at the range with them recently, I hit one of the player's Taylormade (TM) Burner (white) driver and 5 wood. She plays mens' clubs, just with regular shafts that have...
Callaway is really no different than most others in the golf industry. Without searching the web, pick out a manufacturer other than TaylorMade and try to think what their different lines of clubs are. TaylorMade got lucky with the gimmick to paint their woods white. They've milked that gimmick for awhile now, leaving the RBZ (or is it Rocketballs?) clubs white. But that, too, will run its course and they'll find themselves in the same boat as other manufacturers --...
I agree with Stretch. I haven't watched, listened to, or viewed online any so-called "news" sources in the past couple of years. The media -- including local affiliates -- have morphed into shock-entertainment mode only (not that journalism was ever that objective anyway), so I stick to reading just opinion columns to keep up with events. I have a journalistic background, and regular newspapers began to infuriate me in the way they infected straight news stories with...
Oddest shot I've witnessed...   I was helping out at a girls' high school tourney, shuttling the players up a large hill from 17 green to 18 tee box. As I was sitting in the shade waiting for the group on 17 to play and finish the hole, I watched a girl hit her approach shot from just across the creek fronting the green. She shanked it -- the ball headed about 45 degrees to the right, striking the back of a cart occupied by some onlooking parents. As everyone...
With the exception of the Moe Norman-style swing (where the wrists remain in line with the arms at address and impact), the wrists are naturally hinged upward at address. As the club makes it back to parallel, they hinge a bit more. Harvey Penick, in one of his "little" books, stated that at parallel, the wrists have already hinged enough, and that the backswing can be completed with no additional hinging needed.   At address, the arms are naturally more together,...
I bet "lhrocker" isn't exaggerating about getting the distances he's stating by taking the club back to just parallel. I read once (I read a bunch, so I don't recall where) that some 80 percent of your clubhead speed is generated with the releasing of the wrists. I've tried it before on the range, and it holds true. I'm a HS golf coach and I was trying to demonstrate to my better players -- those that could understand -- how important it is to lag the club by delaying...
Play versus practice -- they really seem to be less complimentary of one another and more at constant odds.   I played high school golf ages ago (our the team sucked, but we proudly did so together), and playing was the only thing I did. We didn't have access to a range, so playing and practicing were pretty much one in the same, and improvement over the next few years following high school continued to develop only from being on the course. Although scores from then...
I've been playing for over 30 years now and I still struggle with distractions, mostly from annoying players I'm unfamiliar with in my group. It truly can readily be a "good walk spoiled" if you get an overly-testosteroned idiot joining you who decided to play the game because he failed at other sports and realized golf is a game where you have a captive audience to potentially show-off to for over 5 hours. It's easy to not care about these fools personally, but very...
I find myself practicing more, mainly hitting balls into a large net from a turf mat. I feel the reps are the only true method for improvement, although not always enjoyable. I recently ready two books on the subject of developing "talent" -- The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle and Talent is Overrated by Geoff Colvin. In a nutshell, both authors arrive at the same conclusion on how to become good, even great, at anything -- hard work! The authors discovered it's a common...
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