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Posts by PiKapp23

For the vast majority of golfers it's definitely not going to 'hurt' your drive problems (cutting shaft or choking up). I would think that 'yes' it would at least help with you problem of poping up the driver simply because it will shorten your swing and put you closer to the ball for a more controlled swing.
One thing I always do in those cases is take aim at a point that allows for my normal miss, a fade. I'll move to the right side of tee box and choose a point in the distance on the left hand side of fairway (or sometimes even a little left of that point) and swing with conviction. I do not want to try to take something off the driver because that often leads to bad. I know almost always choke up on driver about 1 1/2 inch as well for more control. These things help we...
My career low on a regulation course is a 72 (+2). I was -2 through 7 and even through 9, but just couldn't keep it together on back. I have been under par only one time and I don't really count it because it was a really short par-3 course (with 2 driveable par 4 holes of less than 250 yards). I shot 27 (-2) there a few years ago with 3 birdies and a bogey, but have never managed to do it again...yet .
I know it seems rather elementary, but try choking up on the driver. Most drivers these days are just too long and result in lost accuracy. I struggled all season, until I bought my Str8-Fit driver. Even then I was still spraying a little bit but once I started choking up I am suddenly hitting lots of fairways again and not losing and real distance because I'm hitting the sweet spot (which I had started to think was just an urban legend). Most modern drivers are 45+ inches...
In one of the golf magazines this month Dave Pelz has a table that says based on handicap how many GIR players average. I was personally surprised at the numbers he posted (although I do not remember exacts now). He has found that a 10 handicap averages only 5 GIR a round and a scratch only averages (I might be off by 1 or 2 on that number). Being a 10 I thought I should be averaging more than I am (which is about 6), but it's interesting to see that I was actually above...
Typically I play 18 on every weekend (usually Sunday), plus 9 on Tuesday evening. This summer I have been teaching my friend's son to play and that usually results in another 9-18 holes on Saturday on a par-3 course. During the summers I also usually average about 1 day a month that I take off work (or a holiday) when I play 18 as well.
If I'm not mistaken, your PW is 46* and your next club is 58*. For many players that might even be 2 wedges (50* and 54* to keep the gaps even) so I definitely think you should go with at least a 52/53* and possibly even consider putting 2 clubs into that gap. With 12* gap you might be talking about a distance gap of 30-40 yards and in wedges you usually want to be no more than 12-15 yards and most prefer closer to 10 yards between clubs. And I agree with hitting the...
With your swing speed I would think steel is a much better option. Graphite would potentially give you more distance, but because they are so much lighter and usually longer you would probably lose some accuracy and feel. The advantage to graphite might be that it would allow you to slow you swing down without sacrificing distance and possibly inproving accuracy because of a more controlled swing and better tempo. If you think you can 'dial back' on your swing speed and...
That's funny...Courses never offer a reduced rate from what I've seen, no matter what the conditions are or what is being done. They 'should' but won't.Your situation is the worst I've heard off. Plenty of times they groundskeepers just keep mowing or whatever, but I've never had them drive right in front of me and definitely never had them drive over my ball then laugh. I understand that the best time to do work is in the middle of the day and I'm fine with that as long...
Each GG should have a PGA Pro and maybe a certified professional fitter as well. These employees are not just paid sales people or cash register jockey's, but real golf professionals. I would trust these people, but would be vey leary of others. They have good intentions and want to help, but often times they do not have the expertise to help in all situations.
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