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Posts by wadesworld

Congrats!  You'd rank in the top 50 of the PGA tour.
 As ColinL pointed out, you can remove loose impediments with your club.  I would guess your coach does not want you to do so because someone might claim that in doing so, you improved your line of play by the club pressing something down, or perhaps the movement of the club altering how the grass lays.  
 Agreed the lack of knowledge of the caddy was surprising, but I'm not surprised about the announcers at all.  In general, there's a relationship:  the more vehemently an announcer argues about a rules issue, the more wrong he is about the actual rule.
In general, you take relief for one rule at a time.  If taking relief from one condition puts you into a position where you are entitled to relief under another rule, you then follow the procedure for that rule.  See decision below.   In the case described one would:   A)  Find the nearest point of relief for the ball on the cart path and drop according the procedure.   B)  Determine if the fence interfered with the stance, swing or lie from the new ball position....
 If your brother didn't want to hit out of the rough, why did he?  Just pull the ball out of all rough and hazards, and should a hazard be in the way, just pick up the ball and drop it on the other side.  You think other golfers would care?  Heck no.   Now, if he were trying to turn in a handicap or running around telling other golfers how badly he "beat" them, people are going to have an issue with that.  But if your brother wants to play with me, as far as I'm concerned,...
 Correct.  I also saw it on nearly every shot during the US Women's Amateur.  It happens all the time.
 No, it was always in-play.  However, the rules require you to re-drop the ball in that situation.  This was one of my misconceptions too.  I thought a drop which violated one of the provisions of 20-2(c) invalidated the drop.  However, if you look, you'll see nowhere under 20-2(c) does it say a drop is invalid.  It simply gives you a list of situations under which you MUST re-drop the ball. The same is true if you drop in wrong place, drop when you're supposed to place,...
New golfers already play under those "rules," so I'm not sure what they're saying it would accomplish.   Ted Bishop likely has only slightly more impact on the rules committee than your average golfer, so I'm not sure his endorsement carries any weight.   I would be supportive of allowing OB / lost ball drops with 2-strokes penalty, but the USGA isn't big on guessing where to drop when they can help it, so I don't think it's going to happen.
Just following up on this thread.  I did email the USGA to see if there were any additional situations when a dropped/placed ball would not be in play.   The email specifically prohibits me from pasting the text of the response, so I'll just summarize:   Rulesman nailed it.  The two situations when a dropped/placed ball is not in play are:      1)  When a ball has not yet been put into play from the teeing ground      2)  When the player had no intention of putting...
 Brookter, Rulesman or Fourputt may have better answers, but as mentioned previously, the standard for knowledge or virtual certainty is very high. This would be an example of knowledge: "I saw the ball hit on the far bank, roll back into the hazard, saw it stop, and I can still see it sitting there, clearly on the hazard side of the line.  With these binoculars, I can see it's your brand and make of ball, and see your identifying mark." This would be an example of virtual...
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