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Posts by wadesworld

Your fellow-competitor was wrong and does not know the rules.  You may ALWAYS take the stroke and distance option, no matter where your ball lay.  Secondly, one cannot declare a ball a "lost."  That said, one of his options for a ball in a water hazard is to play again from the original spot, so he did the right thing accidentally. As for your "mercy rule," it's certainly not correct by the rules of golf.  However, in a casual round, do whatever makes it fun and move on....
 One needs to have some confidence in their understanding of the rules and not be intimated by others, as it's not uncommon for people to try to assert themselves even when they're wrong.  Often they don't even know they're wrong. Recently in a tournament, I had a player argue with me about a rule involving a fellow-competitor's drop.  I told him (politely) that he was wrong, and I was 100% sure he was wrong.  He continued to insist in a very authoritative and somewhat...
 And this is why NFL, MLB and every other sport referees often have to huddle when an uncommon situation comes up.  Not only do they have to huddle, but sometimes you'll see them pull out a rule book.  This is also why they are required to attend yearly training, despite the number and complexity of situations being far fewer. Golf has exponentially more wacky situations than any other sport.  You can have a ball lying on a movable obstruction, on top of an immovable...
What action did he take that would influence the movement of the ball in play or alter physical conditions?  In the scenario described, he did neither.  The ball can be replaced and the situation would be as if the fellow-competitor never touched it. Some examples of a breech of 1-2 would be waving a towel at a ball as it's moving, to try to change its direction, or stepping on a ball to sink it slightly into the green, ruining your fellow-competitor's putt.
11/12.  
Even seeing a splash may not be enough to establish KVC, depending on the trajectory of the ball, how close the splash was to the margin of the hazard, etc.
You need knowledge or virtual certainty that the ball is in the hazard.  To explain that, you need to ask yourself, "Given all the factors of the ball flight, trajectory, surrounding terrain, etc, is there any place this ball could be other than in the hazard?"   If the answer is "Yes" - then you must treat it as a lost ball and replay under stroke and distance.  The fact that you want it to be in the hazard or that it possibly could be in the hazard doesn't matter.  If...
 Believe it or not, rules officials are not always as demanding as posters in rules forums. Jimenez knew where his ball was when he picked it up.  That was enough to satisfy the official, despite the fact he did not have proof his ball wasn't 1 millimeter in the wrong place. Secondly, if in fact the in-booth official gave the wrong rule, it could be because of the way the hosts asked the question (which they often do incorrectly) or because of a conversation going on in...
  I watched it.  It was quite clear what happened and Jimenez was not at fault.  Not sure why there continues to be a question.
 Jimenez didn't insert anything or get anything wrong. He did what the referee told him, and the referee was wrong.
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