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Posts by ChrisGSZ

Thanks for that - I'll take a look. I joined only recently and I'm still finding my way around.....
I was director and professor of sports science at Bath University, UK. I've now retired and I write scientific books on sport. My first is is on the golf swing! thegolfswingzone.com  
The original post actually focussed on two things - what to practise, and how to practise. Much of the debate (in fact nearly all of it - from just a skip-read...) has focussed on the 'what'. Given limited practice time, most people would improve by addressing the 'how' a bit more. In particular, good players who want to get to the very top need to focus on the how.... I'm referring to the science of 'deliberate practice' - to give it it's technical term. It's becoming...
The 'trick' might be to simply think of keeping the hips 'quiet' during the downswing and then 'square at impact'. The reasons for this are:   1. The downswing is undobtedly a rotational action and the hips certainly have to rotate. But it's a 'quiet' rotation because it's towards the beginning of the kinetic chain. The role of the hips is to transfer energy from the initial push against the ground into body rotation. The key hip action is actually to decelerate in...
Your problem will go away once you start believing that power/distance/clubhead speed doesn't come from the strength of your arms. A good first step would be to find a clear explanation of the 'biokinetic chain' and understand how it works. Then read a little about minimising resistance in the downswing by keeping arms and club close to the body. And finally, understand how a double pendulum works - you'll then see why a passive wrist release maximises clubhead...
I've only skip-read through this thread but what seems to be missing is what we should actually do (i.e. focus on mentally) during the downswing.   1. If we focus on accelerating body parts through impact, then we run the risk of destroying the intricate timing of the kinetic chain. Each body section has to slow down to pass energy on to the next link in the chain - so trying to accelerate something that needs to slow down can only disrupt things   2. If we focus...
One thing that often happens on the range is that we think more 'internally' - about technique. Thinking internally disrupts a fluid swing and makes it more 'jerky'. We forget to think about the clubhead, the ball flight, or the target (all external thoughts, which we know promote good coordination and fluid, automated swings). Things can go from bad to worse as the worse we get, the more we think about technique and worse our coordination gets. Two things might...
iacas - no problem.... We actually agree about the mechanics - a stable hub/head is important for a rotary action and a wandering head will ruin it. My point was not about what to do but on how to do it - the skill-learning parameters that we can build on top of the biomechanics. A thought to 'keep the head still' can disrupt coordination. Thoughts such as 'turn in a barrel' can have a similar result and because it addresses a bigger 'package' of movements promotes...
Thanks for the above two comments... I'm well into my 60's - I'm skinny and not very strong. I find a tight radius gives considerably more power. A bigger, younger, stronger guy can use their muscles to generate power very effectively - and they probably have increased control. Swings and roundabouts.... And yes, I agree that we can control the downswing - I was just pointing out that it's very quick and we only have time for one or two thoughts....
That's very interesting..... It might be a good idea be aware of your left elbow - it locks suddenly, which over time might cause injury....
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