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Posts by chipandcharge

Colin007, is there an easy way to translate how much slope your feet tell you into estimating how much the ball will break?  I have been trying to find the apex, but I don't know if I can do that from the information I get from my feet.
Robere, I understand the "me against the course" concept, but for me, I have come to the conclusion that playing in a foursome is not the same as playing by myself on the basis of how much time it takes when you hit once out of every four shots, in general.  I base this on the concept of the impact that rehearsal has on human performance.  When playing alone, each swing becomes rehearsal for the next swing, but with four people hitting, the passage of time reduces the...
Thank you for replying and for the suggestion.  I have been using my feet to sense the tilting of the green, but it never occurred to me to develop the finer sense of differentiating between different levels of slopes.  You made me realize that the ability of the feet to feel different slopes is an alternative to using the eyes to do the same.  I hope I have talented feet.
Has anyone heard of this vision problem?  If I'm looking at a horizontal line, like the top of my TV set or the top of a bookcase, my dominant eye sees it as sloping down to the left approximately at a three degree slope.    When I look at a green that has no side to side slope, I see it sloping down to the left.  If the green slopes down left to right by less than three degrees, I see it sloping down right to left.    I can't be lazy and read the green from just...
I play by myself quite often, nine if I walk and 18 if I ride.  I do this because I play on a rather spur of the moment schedule.  However, I have begun to notice that I played better when I played alone, and it took me awhile before I figured it out.  I thought at first that it was because I wasn't distracted by the conversations.  Later, I realized that I played better alone because I swung more frequently, and I could "remember" my swing better from one to the next. ...
 I can give this eyes closed practice a try, which would be what looks like a small extension oftrying to emulate the cognitive processes of a sightless golfer.  I say "what looks like a small extension"because in trying to understand the cognitive processes of a sightless golfer, I had my cognitive processesanalyzed (tested) by a cognitive psychologist, and they turn out to be almost exactly the opposite ofthose that would be theoretically used by a sightless golfer. ...
I may be asking a question that has an obvious answer, but how important is having depth perception, and correct depth perception, at that, to the golf swing?  For three years, I have been fighting a problem related to retina damage in my left eye.  On the opthalmologis's' depth perception test, I score zero out of nine (can't see even the first one).  Furthermore, if I were to try to simply tap the ball with the butt end of the club, I would miss it completely, on the...
Kyle--thank you for what you wrote.  It triggered a thought in my mind as I read it.  I know enough from competing in tennis and volleyball tournaments to focus on the point at hand and not possible match outcomes, or one shot at a time.  I think I'm letting other thoughts creep into my mind.  The thought that came to my mind is that maybe I'm like the proverbial "front runner," the horse that runs freely at the start of the race when he gets out in front, but begins to...
I had a round today that is example of a problem that I have and I'm looking for suggestions.   The problem:  good front nine (43) and bad back nine (50).    This happens quite often.  The opposite hardly happens (bad front nine; good front nine).   My current hypothesis is that I either get over-confident and lose focus on the back nine, or I get tired and lose focus.  My main source of increased scores on the back nine is making bad contact with the ball.   When...
I'm working on making my actual swing at the ball be as close to my practice swing as possible so that I benefit more from the practice swing that I currently do.  Like many, by swing changes when the ball is there.  I have difficulty with the "ignore the ball" advice.  I didn't know why, but I think I do now.   I read about the works of Swiss psychologist Carl G. Jung, who said that people differ in how my their minds are energized by objects around them--when some...
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