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Posts by bkuehn1952

I have played the TPC Las Vegas and the TPC Old White (Greenbrier).  Both were excellent experiences.  It sounds like you just had a bad day at TPC San Antonio.  It is hard to imagine that the course operates like you described on a consistent basis with 6-7 hour rounds.  The membership would rebel and the public would stop coming.
Finally, my moment to really brag.  I can't hit it straight and 350 yards, with my 1 iron.  My low round doesn't start with a "6".  I have had, however, some great 5-8 day trips entirely paid during the past 8 years.   Scotland (St. Andrews) Pebble Beach Ireland Pinehurst Greenbrier   Of course we are not schlepping around at 3 star hotels.  Old Course Hotel and Gleneagles Resort, The Carolina, The Inn at Spanish Bay, etc...  I am still on an emotional high from...
Play the white tees.  Keep an eye on your ball at all times if there is any chance of going in the rough.  Even with moderate length rough it is hard to find the balls as they tend to sink down.   Have fun.  Have someone take your photo teeing off on the par 3 holes that descend toward the water.
I rarely attempt to play fast.  The goal for me is a good score and an enjoyable game, not elapsed time.  I walk briskly and do not take a great deal of time in my pre-shot routine.  I also, however, stray from the mission of playing fast by picking up trash, repairing pitch marks and replacing/repairing particularly thoughtless unrepaired divot holes.   What I find impressive is the 76 shot in about 46 minutes playing Bandon Dunes - running!
I am not a big fan of trees in the middle of a fairway.  In moderation and properly designed, the feature adds to the interest of a course. When improperly placed, a large tree in the fairway can be a source of frustration. The problem a tree (or trees) presents is unlike a bunker or water hazard.  With a bunker or water one can lay up short and go over the hazards with the next shot.  A tree punishes the layup. I am certainly no course designer but if an architect wants a...
I am not condoning this approach but I think sometimes "committees" consider the respective places the competitors finished.  If "Refuses to follow the Rules" guy finished tied for 14th place in the 4th flight and the victim was similarly situated, telling people they are DQ'ed just creates strife. At minimum, they should have gone over the procedure of playing a 2nd ball with the OP so next time he runs into "Refuses to follow the Rules" guy, he can correctly save himself...
Are the systems using a multiple of a certain club's distance based on carry or roll?  Presumably it is carry since the roll would be unpredictable (firm flat fairways versus soft rolling ones).
The consensus seems to be that most of us never time our own search or the search of a competitor or opponent, with a few exceptions (good for you!). The consensus also seems to be that most searches are much less than 5 minutes, which is my experience, but this conclusion is based on our estimates of elapsed time, not an actual measurement.  We all know how imprecise our estimates can be at times; just ask someone how far they think that drive  went!   My solution is...
Who takes a watch out and notes the time whenever a "lost ball" search is commenced? If one does not do it every time, how does one know they are within the 5 minute limit?   [okay, those who only play on very busy courses probably know when two minutes has elapsed because that is when the group behind starts teeing off.  This is intended for everyone else.  ;) ]
Can we all agree that if one is capable of flying a shot to the front  of a green, hitting while the other group is in the vicinity is wrong and not funny?  Can we also agree that unless one is the person hit by a golf ball on a one hop, that judging the hit as "nothing serious" is really the other person's call?  Finally, if I had been so foolish as to hit into the group, I would have immediately trotted up to them, made my profuse apologies and taken whatever tongue...
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