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Posts by Bjans1

I would probably qualify for this.   I was an excellent high school player who improved rapidly from one year to the next. I went from a high 70's shooter to playing to a scratch by the start of my senior year. I was obsessed with golf and my summers were spent working at a course and then when I wasn't working I was playing or practicing. I was determined to play Division 1 golf. I had a bunch of offers from smaller schools and D2 schools but I didn't give them a whole...
I feel like this will be a huge hit for certain PGA tour stops but will bomb in the retail sales department.   In the last 15 years a big reason why driver sizes have grown is the forgiveness offered by the larger heads on mishits, no? So now people who "can't hit a driver" are somehow going to be more accurate hitting an even smaller driver? What am I missing?
Still laughing. Thanks guys.   The over/under for this thread to die is Sunday of the US Open.
As someone else mentioned, think about all the hacks that these skilled golfers have played with throughout their golf careers... you are likely not even in the bottom 50%. Keep pace and the wont even notice.   I'd also recommend teeing it forward. Nobody will respect you any less dude, it's golf.
I'm no swing coach but it looks like she takes the club pretty far behind her body and creates a tremendous amount of torque just to be able to hit the ball even 200 yards. She keeps this swing up and her body matures she'll have the distance to play with the boys on a regular basis. And think of the short game that you gotta have to be scoring like that with such a short tee ball. It's straight up scary. I don't watch women's golf but I'll definitely be tuning in to watch...
Best place to start IMO is your state's golf association. For example, I'm a wisconsin resident and if you check their website WSGA.org you'll see a tournament schedule that has a bunch of events for both gross and net types.   There's also the USGA events that you can play (assuming you have the proper handicap credentials).   Finally, check the local courses in your area, there's a lot of tournaments to be found on the bulletin boards near the pro shop/locker rooms...
Agreed with the above that you should play the junior tournaments that your schedule will allow to build up some competitive golf experience. Do you play on a high school team?   I took up golf seriously at 14 and couldn't break 100. By 18 I was headed to play college golf with a plus handicap. It takes a ton of dedication and, even if you don't make the "tour", you're going to acquire some seriously valuable skills along the way.   The best piece of advice I can give...
I played two rounds with Bronson La'Cassie when I was trying to make the University of Minnesota golf team. Bronson won a Web.com tour event this year and has his 2014 PGA tour card locked up.    http://www.pgatour.com/players/player.26956.bronson-la-cassie.html   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bronson_La'Cassie   If you see him on the leaderboard next year, root for him, awesome guy. 
If you're a 15 handicapper you might be better suited for something else IMO. If you're set on a 913, definitely get the larger, more forgiving D2.   I'm a 4 handicapper who went to a D2 earlier this year. I'm a high ball hitter so I have a 8.5 degree driver that is surefit down to 7.75 and the heavy mitsubishi shaft (black w/ the flowers in photos).   What are you trying to achieve by making the switch? What is your current ballflight shape? Do you want to...
I played 4 years of high school golf and then a year of golf in college.   My first swing in a golf meet in high school the ball moved exactly zero inches. Completely whiffed. I shot like 54 that day on a real easy course. By the time my senior year rolled around I had become one of the top players in the area. The progress I made and the life skills I learned along the way are two things that I am proud of.   Go try out, kid, you're in for a long and rewarding...
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