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Posts by acerimusdux

http://www.wilson.com/en-us/golf/irons/feel/wilson-staff-fg-tour-v4-utility-irons/       Obviously weights in the sole and toe, thin carpenter steel face, and a hollow area behind that face.
  Phil busting a 2013 Callaway X-Forged 8-iron, with KBS Tour-V 125x shaft, while Troy Merritt shattered the face of a Wilson Staff FG Tour V4 utility 2-iron.   But clearly this is due to playing secondary brands like Wilson and Callaway, when they should have been playing Titleist.
 I think your disagreement with Erik is mainly over the word "competitive",  if you think making cuts and finishing 53rd isn't competitive. But I don't think anyone is really arguing that the scratch golfer would be in the top 50 on the LPGA Tour.  If you look at the LPGA scoring averages though, the falloff from there is pretty steep, and a good scratch male (who can play to that level in tournament golf and maybe has above average consistency), should easily be...
 But we're looking at samples of 20 scores. A 1:60 event will occur in one in every three such samples. It was only a 69 in this sample due to randomness, which was included to make the scores look more realistic. It doesn't really change the argument if you make it a 70 instead. Also, look even at PGA players, and you will see 69 then 75 (or vice-a-versa) isn't that uncommon.  Look at Bay Hill this weekend:  Ryo Ishikawa: 70 69 69 75Blayne Barber: 72 65 74 73Kevin Kisner:...
Lihu,   I think the guy you are imagining is maybe also possible as well. I was going off what are supposed to be the typical "average" scratch golfer, but since we're talking about a subset of truly competitive tournament golfers here, maybe they do have to be more consistent.   Take this set of 20 scores (I won't bother randomizing the order this time): 70,71,71,72,72,72,73,73,73,73,73,73,74,74,74,75,75,75,76,77   This golfer is still a 0 handicap. But his standard...
 That says it's 1:57. Remember, he's scratch, so a 69 is only about  a -3 differential. And that was the only 1 in 20 that was a -2 differential or better (I had no 70 there). So if you like, just make that 69 a 70, and it's still a handicap of .25, average score now 74.3, and standard deviation now 2.4. Moreover, assume three stokes are gained in his 10 handicap rounds due to ESC, say a 74 is recorde as a 72 and a 72 as a 71 for handicap purposes, and then that handicap...
Or another example:   74,71,76,78,72,75,75,73,76,76,73,77,77,72,74,69,75,71,78,73   That's a scratch golfer (handicap of .17) on a course with a 72 CR, with a scoring average of 74.2, with only 25% of scores at 72 or better, and standard deviation of about 2.6.   And keep in mind we haven't considered ESC, either. If we add to the above scores for handicap purpoese, that out golfer has one or two holes in 20 rounds where he scored worse than double bogey, that won't...
 Even PGA Tour pros aren't that consistent. You are giving these guys a standard deviation just over one stroke, those scores aren't realistic. A more realistic set of scores might be something like: 75, 72, 79, 73, 73, 71, 74, 78, 69, 76, 74, 74, 72, 76, 73, 76, 70, 73, 75, 72, 77 That's a scratch golfer on a course with a 72 CR.
 Close, but I think the rule of thumb is you shoot your handicap or better 1/5 to 1/4 of the time. For an exactly "scratch" golfer, the CR is his course handicap. So his average score is likely more than 2 strokes above that. I think I mentioned above that the average men's CR for the tournaments the LPGA has played this year was right about 72, so the scratch male would have luikely had a scoring average in the 74-74.5 range. Well this week, at the Founder's Cup, they are...
 Yes, a scratch woman can hit it 210. But not many start out there.  For a woman, hitting it 150 to start might be comparable to a guy who starts out hitting it 200.
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