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Posts by ColinL

Thanks Gary - very helpful.  Just one further thought about  the actual situation on the putting green:  if a fellow competitor refuses to move his ball marker and a player moves it anyway, he may be exercising a right that he doesn't have but he incurs no penalty for doing so.  The situation on the putting green at the time is at least resolved to the extent of allowing them to get on with the game.  The contribution to friendly conversation for the rest of the round...
Sorry, but there is nothing at all confusing about the exceptions to what is  equipment which include "any small object, such as a coin or tee ... when it is used to mark the position of a ball ... "     The marker is marking the position of the ball from start to finish - from placing it before lifting the ball to lifting it after replacing the ball.  That's what the words say.  They do not say that the exception applies only prior to lifting - which seems to be what you...
A few points in response to what has been said about my post about the ball marker being a movable obstruction.   A ball marker when in use to mark the position of a ball is not equipment - see the Definition:    An obstruction is anything artificial  - with certain exceptions but a ball marker is not one of them.  A ball marker  is by definition an obstruction.   A ball marker can be moved without unreasonable effort, without unduly delaying play and without...
Why, indeed.  Since there is nothing wrong in marking up your ball, and nothing wrong in aligning a lifted ball using such a mark when replacing it, why would there be any restriction on when you did the marking?
 If another player refused to move his ball marker, you could move it out of the way yourself.  It's a movable obstruction.
 Wouldn't wiping it on  a towel be less painful? 
See Rule 21 for the three situations in which you are not allowed to clean your ball: Lifting a ball that is interfering with play.Lifting a ball to identify it.Lifting a ball to check if it is unfit for play.
First point is just wrong, Fr0sty.  You can clean your ball when taking relief from an abnormal ground condition like casual water,  See Rule 25.The ball may be cleaned when lifted under Rule 25-1b. Re the second point,  I can't see any value in taking relief from an embedded ball in casual water and then from the casual water - what would be gained?  Taking relief in two stages from casual water in ground under repair could, however,  make sense if it meant that  the NPR...
I see no problem: if  the ball is in the casual water, relief can be taken from the casual water whatever situation the ball is in - embedded, up against an obstruction, lost.
Many a score would I have rescued if you could just drop a ball where it entered the woods!   In terms of the Rules, if  your ball is  OOB, or is lost (with certain exceptions noted below) you must put another ball into play from where you played your last stroke. Stroke and distance -  as simple as that (Rule 27-1).  Probably the first rule I learned as a wee boy. The exceptions are where your ball is lost  in a water hazard, in an abnormal ground condition (e.g. GUR), or...
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