or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by JoePete

Yes, there can be measured physical aspects - like coefficient of restitution - however, I would maintain much greater factors to length off the tee are club length and loft. Bear in mind, that a persimmon clubhead does not result in the meeting of ball and solid wood - the persimmon has inserts of any number of materials - including titanium. Now, yes, club manufacturers enhanced these properties in modern clubfaces by making them so thin that there can be a "trampoline...
I think such assessments more reflect what today's players are accustomed to. They have grown up with composite shafts and oversized heads. Yes, there are physical distinctions between clubs of yesteryear and today, but if you were to do this experiment in reverse, take a good player accustomed to playing persimmon and stick a modern driver in his or her hands, not only wouldn't they have some immediate improvement, but they likely would drive the ball worse given their...
Given that the ball flies much farther today (especially compared to balatas) and that clubs are jacked up a full four degrees (if not more) than the clubs of a couple of decades ago, in theory, most golfers are playing shorter courses compared to their counterparts in the 1970s or 80s without going to forward tees. I don't think the issue with pace of play has to do with the length of the course as much as the inexperience of today's golfer vs. that of a few decades ago....
Maybe I am missing the intended sarcasm? The point of sports is they teach cooperation - not just at a team level but at the individual level of having mind and body work together. In my experience, golf teaches this very well. Unfortunately, we have become so obsessed with outcomes in our society we have completely lost appreciation for the process. Whether you are talking standardized testing, investments, or the way youth sports are structured and taught today, we have...
Just because a golf club imposes restrictions on tee times, it does not constitute discrimination - at least in the pejorative sense of the word - and to make a sweeping accusation of it being such (as Kate Hudson and others do) is to commit the very act you are decrying - passing judgment without endeavoring to have a full understanding. While various clubs might have restrictions, I think you will find such things often reflect also the different categories of...
Depends on where you go, but the cost of getting old irons adjusted, reshafted, etc. likely will be close to getting something new. I think this choice comes down to stick with what you have or jump into something completely new, and in most cases, I would lean toward keeping what you have spending money on lessons and practice.  Hard to say, again, I think what you have is sufficient for you now. My own feeling is we tend to over-fit ourselves. The one bit of advice I...
Back in the late 90s or so, a man named Michael Oliff wrote a book "From Hacker to Hero in 12 months" The short of it is Oliff, a rather wealthy management consultant, took a year off of life to work on his golf game. You might find some insights about his strategy. Most people, should be able to get to a 10 or lower at some point in their life - it's just a matter of some instruction and a lot of practice. Of course you are also dealing with a mathematical formula. You...
The problem with a draw/hook as a miss is that it can go hot. It's typically low and has a lot of run. I think it is a myth that it is a preferred shot. I think the case is most beginner/high-handicappers slice the ball (reflective of swing faults that mostly involve bad or no turning of the body). Hence, the thinking is good is the opposite of slicing (hook or draw). The problem is you can have plenty of swing faults but teach yourself to draw if that is the only outcome...
Overall, my view is the USGA has preserved the game. The equipment issues have me rolling my eyes at times too, but, for example, consider just the work of the USGA Green Section. Literally saving golf courses and moving practices forward is a critical component to maintaining the game and its enjoyment for all. And while the rules can seem a little pedantic, the USGA I believe maintains perspective. The equipment stuff, even when they do make a ruling, usually it comes...
 Based on the picture, my guess it is one of the newer models  - more toward the 1970s than the 30s or 40s. I base that on the fact that early models had patent numbers on them. Those tend to be the more collectible versions. Also, the Cash In had many variants, both in design and material. I would liken it to Acushnet and "Bullseye" putters - it was more a category of putter than a specific model. A few other pictures might help folks identify it. The grip, if original,...
New Posts  All Forums: