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Posts by 1badbadger

The cool thing about the e6 is that even though it is a low spinning ball, it has a soft feel.  The e5 is a higher launching/higher spinning ball, so it will have more bite around the greens and is a good choice if you have a low trajectory.  If you fight a slice or hook it will tend to curve more though.  It's a heck of a ball in my opinion. The e6 doesn't spin as much, but that's one of the reasons it's so long and straight.  It's the softest multi-layer ball on the...
 Bridgestone manufactures them Joe, but they are not re-badged Bridgestone models.  Same with the Nike balls...Bridgestone makes several models but they are designed by Nike.  Here is an excerpt from a Golf Digest article on the Nicklaus balls:"In the past, Nicklaus has lent his name to signature brands of golf balls, but the new Nicklaus line is proprietary, manufactured to his specifications after three years of testing. Nicklaus said Bridgestone is manufacturing the...
 Part of it is that your 54* has a heavier swingweight to start with...a stock Vokey is D-5, your irons are probably about D-2 and your other wedges are probably between D-2 to D-4.  But the extra 1" adds 6 swingweight points which is a lot.  The midsize grip actually reduces the swingweight a little, but it's still probably close to E-0, which will definitely make it feel heavier than the rest of your clubs.  There was a similar debate in the early '90's among billiard...
Why did Titleist, Nike and Miura bother?  
 You never know...when Rory McIlroy ended his relationship with Wozniacki he won 4 days later then won the Open Championship about 3 weeks after that!  He bounced back rather well.
 Mr. D is right...Titleist has been preaching this for a long time.  This method sounds good in theory, but I think there are better ways.  When starting around the green, players tend to choose the ball that has the best bite (most spin).  When players start hitting half to full shots with a wedge, the overall performance of a ball will be masked by the effect of loft and backspin. Spin is obviously important...I don't mean having the most spin, but having the correct...
I was in golf retail for quite a while, so I have literally removed thousands of stickers of all kinds, from price stickers, bar codes, OEM stickers, shaft bands etc.  Here are a couple of things I learned over the years that will make your life much easier: -When possible, always start with a heat gun.  I've even used a normal hair dryer in a pinch, it just takes a little longer.  Don't use a torch.   -Don't melt the stickers off with the heat gun...just use enough...
He wrote a book in the early '90s called Buried Lies which was a collection of stories about being on tour and other players/celebrities.  I thought it was entertaining, and there were certain parts I found genuinely funny.  I don't find him all that funny when he's doing commentary work, but when he is being interviewed he is one of the better personalities....again more entertaining than funny.
 Nice.  
 Not necessarily.  Keep in mind that golf balls are made differently than they used to be, and you can't compare the compression ratings of modern balls to the old "90s and 100s" from 20 or 30 years ago.  Some of the current balls on the market have compression ratings in the 40s and even lower!  Yes, they are soft, but probably not as soft as what you're imagining.  Compression ratings can be used to give players an idea of how a soft or firm a ball might feel compared to...
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