or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by CarlOwen

OK,  I was a bit unnerved and rude and I apologise- but I find it completely absurd that a 13 handicapper averages 31 putts a round. I've been around awhile and I have never seen anyone but the best golfers average considerably less than 2 putts per hole. I will stand by this.   As for the original premise of the thread, the poster wishes to get to single digits and wants to know how to get there with a reasonable amount of effort. I submit that decent golfers (low...
he could hit HALF THE GIR and with 31 putts have a low single digit handicap. It makes no sense whatsoever. This tells me he hits only a couple GIR in an entire round, which if is true, shouldn't be offering advice to a new player looking to lower his score.
I disagree with you folks as to Boogielicious, you must be a terrible golfer with a 13 handicap while averaging 31 putts a round. The PGA tour average is about 30 with a scoring average of about 71. I'm a 12, and I average about 40 putts. The only thing that got me out of the 90's forever was getting 4 puts off my card, minimizing 3 putts, learning how to sink 3 and 4 footers 95% of the time and sinking a few 10 to 15 footers. For a golfer who can play competently, and...
assuming you have a decent swing and can hit the ball (judging from your handicap)   There is nothing you can do to lower your score more effectively than learning how to sink putts.  If a course has a par 72 this means 36 of these strokes are putts.   My game really fell apart this year because of a few lessons (don't ask) but I was able to maintain a fairly consistent handicap because my putting was more effective. hopefully next year I can forget what I "learned"...
depends how cheap you want to go.  There is nothing wrong with Tommy Armour silver scott 845's. I've seen pretty good players using these for years. I'll bet you can find a set of irons second hand for considerable less than $100. Put on some new grips and or replace the shafts and you'll be good to go.
it's interesting about how much we all agree about using broken tees on par 3's. Maybe it comes from when we were kids and having enough tees was a perennial problem. (you knew that breaking the tee was nearly a given) We never seemed to have problems with having extra balls in the bag, but tees were an entirely different story.
I will not look at the tee box markers almost to the point of pretending they are not there. It has screwed me up way too many times when trying to aim the ball. This is also true with looking at the grass in front of the tee box, again too many times the bias of the cut is not going in the direction where I want to hit my drive. As a result- I hit a lot of fairways.
I meant to reply to your post first, anyhow, I too am embracing the "powerfade" by aiming up the left side of most fairways and keeping the ball in play. I'd say the total left to right travel is about 20 yards so it is fairly predictable and manageable. I'd say I hit most fairways pretty consistently as a result.However, as you pointed out, every once in awhile it comes back to bite me when the ball just goes dead straight up the left side rough. regarding your second...
I'm still working on not letting bad holes/bad breaks affect my mood on the remaining holes- I have a really hard time recovering, with all the "what ifs"  and this recurring thought "this is why you'll never break 80" otherwise, I'm working on just trying to more confident and optimistic as I address the ball on every shot. Swing wise, I'm actually pretty content for once.
4 hours is reasonable for most courses but slow for others.The point many of us are trying to make is many weekend golfers have delusions of grandeur and believe all this careful deliberation is necessary and practical. Whether it's practicing the honors "you're away" on the 4th shot into a par four, or laboring over a sloping 40 footer for bogey, it's all rather stupid.The topic is "what is the correct pace of play" -nothing I witnessed last week on that muni indicates...
New Posts  All Forums: