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Posts by jaacobbowden

True, there is certainly that aspect of increasing swing speed...that is, getting a big gain right off the bat for those that have been sedentary.  But that actually goes for anyone that doesn't practice their speed, even Tour players who have been playing a long time and have been stuck at what they may perceive to be their maximum speed. 30 mph is rare, yes, but still possible.  Three that come to mind are 105 mph to 139 mph, 95 mph to 139 mph (4 months), and 93 mph...
With respect to your comments about increasing club head speed... Yes, increasing range of motion and strength can help with swing speed, but the effects of yoga on swing speed are negligible. Improving balance also has it's benefits and is important, but getting better balance won't necessarily increase swing speed. Hitting the ball in the center of the club face versus hitting off-center has influence on ball speed, but not swing speed. Swing mechanics are obviously...
Hehe, I know.  I get that reaction quite a bit.  ;-) Trainers these days do well with general fitness, flexibility, injury prevention, etc...but what lacked was an expert in swing speed training, so that's an area I've been focusing on for years.  Not increases in swing speed from technical kinds of things (which is most of what you find), but rather making improvements to what your body can physically do.  Believe it or not I've actually had numerous people go up over...
Quote: Depending on how much time and effort you're willing to put in, there's quite a few things you can do to increase your swing speed. First, simply practicing swinging fast helps.  I know it sounds simple and obvious, but most people beyond professional long drivers don't do it.  If you want to get better at something, it only makes sense to practice it.  So I would say at least a couple times a week, hit some drives as fast as you can while still staying under...
Technique and club fitting certainly play a role in swing speed and hitting the ball farther, but since you said your technique is okay and you have been fit for your clubs, I would suggest doing some actual physical swing speed training...because someone with good technique and equipment who swings at 100 won't hit the ball as far as someone with identical technique and well-fit equipment who swings 110, 120, etc.  At that point, it's just about getting your body in...
My fastest on a Trackman when I was doing long drive was 139mph, although mostly on the golf course I'll play around the Tour average of 111-112 mph. The Tour Trackman average ranges from 104 (David Toms) to 125 (Bubba Watson).  The LPGA average is 94.  A lot of amateur women/seniors I train go around 60-85 mph.  Most amateur men I work with are 85-95. Jamie Sadlowski, 2-time RE/MAX World Long Drive Champion regularly runs in the mid-140s at Worlds.  Joe Miller,...
Yes, the distance gaps were just fine for me.  Length of the club has a minor affect on distance...but loft is the primary determinant.  People that I've talked to that have tried them have told me they've also had sufficient gapping.
A ways back, I wrote an article about my experience with them.  I think they are great. 
Do you know the specs on the old Tommy Armours? Even though they were same length clubs, maybe there was something objectively in their design that weren't making them sell well.
Yup, glad to help. FYI, I got an email from Tim Hewitt, one of the iMatch dealers...apparently they are sold out at the moment. Every time they do another run at the foundry they use, I think they have to commit to 500 sets. So like a lot of companies they are just waiting for the economy to improve a bit before making more.
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