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gills

Swing speed = shaft flex

23 posts in this topic

Hey,

Just went to golfsmith yesterday and finally got an official reading on my driver club head speed with the launch monitor. I thought i would've been around 100mph which is why got my 9* Cobra HS9 with a stiff shaft, but that was all speculation.

Anyway... in general , what speed it the cut-off between a regular flex and stiff flex shaft? I was averaging 95mph and hitting it about 240-250 according to the LM when struck well (which is about right) and the guy working there said that I'd probably benefit from a regular flex shaft and/or higher loft driver. My launch angles were around 12-14 with my HS9.

What do you guys think?
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Since I'm not a fitter (nor do I play one on TV), I'll just share the information I've read about and heard from fitters. And again...as you've said, it's "general".

It depends.

It depends on the particular shaft. One companies "stiff" may be another one's "regular". There are no standard guidelines when it comes to graphite shafts...again, that's what I've read.

Plus there's so many other things to consider....kick point, weight, bend...it can be maddening.

I'm roughly the same swing speed...95-100. I had a regular flex Fujikura in my Callaway FT-5. It ballooned big time with a tendency to fade. On the suggestion of a good local fitter, I switched over to a Fujikura E-360 stiff shaft and it's done wonders. No more ballooning, and I've probably gained 25-30 yards on my drives. Used to be, my ball flight was so high and with so much spin it would hit the fairway and suck back about a foot. Now it's lower...and I finally get some roll! Nice to be back (yardage wise) to where I used to be.
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I had a speed of inbetween 90-95 and I was told I was borderline for a Stiff flex, I went with the Regular and made the wrong decision, now that I'm getting stronger After 2 years with the club I need a Stiff flex. If you are anywhere above 95, get a stiff.

Like clubchucker said though, alot of flexes are different. I know some regular shafts that play like stiffs or even extra stiff.
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Hell, I went from a Diamana x stiff to a Speeder 757 x stiff and gained 11 yards. It depends on your launch characteristics of a regular vs. a stiff. You may need the stiff for the lower torque if you are wild off the tee. However, if you aren't wild, then the regular may be better because it should give you more distance.

Nicklaus always stated that you play the weakest flex that keeps you in the fairway and that you can control.
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Nicklaus always stated that you play the weakest flex that keeps you in the fairway and that you can control.

i absolutely agree. but I just can't control a regular flex...but when I was swinging regular, i'd have more drives around the 300 range.... but i was all over the place. now i'm around 265 and straight....with a 280 - 290..maybe even a 300 knock here and there....but i'm all about being in control & in the fairway.

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I am 94 MPH, and I went stiff after being told borderline. I am glad I did.
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I am 94 MPH, and I went stiff after being told borderline. I am glad I did.

Guess you were in the same situation as I was, and you made the right choice, which actually saved you money in the long run. Now because of a stupid choice, I have to pay more.

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Maybe try to look for someone who is willing to trade down from stiff to regular?

The first driver I bought had a regular shaft and I could not even put the ball into play. I have enough distance that I can always err on the side of stiff/x-stiff. Go go accuracy.
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I am 95-100 and I had a stiff shaft that could not be controlled by me. I sprayed everything right. I am not sure what kind of shaft it was but it came stock on my Big Bertha 460. When I went to try out my new driver I wanted to make sure I got the right shaft. The HiBore XL red tour regular flex works out fabulous for me. I think it has a little stiffer tip to keep it from spraying but I am hitting it straight.

When I was in the launch monitor the guy working there said something to me that made sense. He said you know if you are borderline stiff/reg your swing probably is not going to be as fast at the end of your round. So by the end of the round I would most likely be swinging in the Regular Flex speed.
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As some others said, if you consistantly swing your driver more than 95 you should really be using a overall stiffer shaft. The specifics depend on the way you swing it. For example, I use a stiff staft with a softer tip.
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What happens if you have a stiff shaft and your swing speed is lower? Say 89-90...

I guess my question is, if the staff is too stiff, what are the drawbacks? Low trajectory? Slices?
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Why not just tip a regular flex a half inch or use stiff tipped a half inch less? Since most recreation golfers use a driver that's too long to begin with, just have the r-flex tipped a half inch and your driver would be a half inch shorter and more solid contact. The shaft would be playing to a firm which is between reg and stiff. Go see a clubfitter and he will agree plus it would save from having to buy a new shaft. Just my recommendation. Good luck. By the way, it will affect swingweight but the clubfitter can add tungsten powder or a tip weight to get the swingweight back to normal. It shouldn't cost more then about $15 with new ferrule included.
Mike
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Hey,

My driver swing speed is around 95mph as well, but I chose Reg flex considering that my swing speed would most probably slow down after like 12 holes or something. Also the saying, "When in doubt, choose lesser flex" and "Less flex hurts less" those kind of thing.

In the end, choosing in-between flex has to do with your swing tempo. Mine is medium-fast. I honestly think you should actually hit balls outdoor with reg and stiff flex. Take note on the ball path and feel when trying various shaft brands and flexes. Choose the one that fits you best (tighter dispersion). Hope this helps.
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What happens if you have a stiff shaft and your swing speed is lower? Say 89-90...

In general, you'd have much lower ball trajectory from the result of not being able to load/unload the shaft. Another indication is the boardy feel at impact. Slicing is more a sensitive subject as it depends on the way you swing, but yes you'd more likely to slice with shaft too stiff.

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Guess you were in the same situation as I was, and you made the right choice, which actually saved you money in the long run. Now because of a stupid choice, I have to pay more.

Same here...Mine was 92 so GS recommended stiff flex..Very happy I asked them to check my speed..

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great replies, thank you.

As far as my swing speed changing throughout the round, it definitely does as could be seen on the LM.


If you plotted my swing speed as a function of time (sorry, i'm in school for mechanical engineering ), the curve would be bell shaped with my fastest swing speeds being in the middle and slowest being at the beginning and end, but more so in the beginning (which leads me to believe that i should definitely warm up a little at the range before going out).

So when i first started swinging, my swing speeds were high 80's - low 90's, then started increasing to a max of about 96-97, then ending in the low-mid 90's. I took a total of about 100 swings (no one at golf smith that evening ).

But the drivers that felt the best and performed the best were a 9.5* TM superquad with the stock R-flex and then the callaway FT-5 neutral with stock S-flex. But overall, the most consistent was the TM with the R-flex.

But i don't know, i just started playing 3 years ago. I went to Stratton mountain, VT golf university last summer to get a complete revamp of my game and things are starting to come together. Right now, my heart is telling me to get that superquad w/ R-flex shaft.
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i bought the Stiff FTi Callaway Driver and i know im a Stiff flex guy but i was hitting the ball horrible with it kept on Hooking no matter what i did i would actully hope to slice because the hook was so unbelievable and im not a Great golfer. or average golfer i pretty much suck. but im thinking that the Fti head is so light and the stiff flex was so stiff that there was no feeling of the club for me. you dont feel anything. so i went back to golf smith returned it and got the Regular flex i never took it out to the Course yet. but i did take it to the range my balls went further with the regular flex.. but now im Slicing and hooking only a lil bit rather then the the stiff was just too much Hook. and the club just feels better with a Regular Flex. you can actully feel a kick point in the club. and i like the way it feels better so with alot of clubs just go with what feels better. when you swing only thing i can think of. because with the FTI Stiff there was no feeling in the stiff shaft at all.

i was actually wondering if they make some other shaft that is a Medium Stiff for a driver because i have the FT ibrid callaway irons and they have a Medium stiff on there Steel shaft and its Awesome perfect shaft for me i actually Love the shaft on those irons so much its unbelievable so does any one know of a shaft that has a Regular/Stiff
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i bought the Stiff FTi Callaway Driver and i know im a Stiff flex guy but i was hitting the ball horrible with it kept on Hooking no matter what i did i would actully hope to slice because the hook was so unbelievable and im not a Great golfer. or average golfer i pretty much suck. but im thinking that the Fti head is so light and the stiff flex was so stiff that there was no feeling of the club for me. you dont feel anything. so i went back to golf smith returned it and got the Regular flex i never took it out to the Course yet. but i did take it to the range my balls went further with the regular flex.. but now im Slicing and hooking only a lil bit rather then the the stiff was just too much Hook. and the club just feels better with a Regular Flex. you can actully feel a kick point in the club. and i like the way it feels better so with alot of clubs just go with what feels better. when you swing only thing i can think of. because with the FTI Stiff there was no feeling in the stiff shaft at all.

Man, do you take a breath while you're talking to someone in person? Because you should do the same when you post on a forum! Did you ever get measured on a launch monitor? I know i assumed that i was automatically a stiff flex just because of my build; 6'1", 200lbs, but it turns out that i'm not necessarily a stiff flex. Rather, i'm on the cusp of regular flex and stiff flex. Honestly, when i fist got my HS9 it felt slightly boardy but over the last year it's felt decent when i would connect properly. I just don't like how the face on the HS9 is closed more than average. I also don't like how light the club head feels. The one thing i noticed immediately with the TM superquad was that it felt like i was swinging something substantial. Obviously is has to do with the fact that the TM is all titanium and the HS9 is a carbon composite/titanium blend. Don't know though. Right now i'm torn between getting a new driver: the TM superquad or the FT5, or just keeping my HS9.
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