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JYB

Best Place to live for golf year round

37 posts in this topic

Okay. Here's the big question :

Where in the USA is the best place to live if you want to golf year round? Name specific towns/cities, the size of them, where they are and how many courses are around.
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Hawaii, Southern California

I'm not going to go into specs but those are the obvious choices.
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Add Arizona to the list of obious choices
Maybe Florida and most parts of Texas
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Well best place out of USA would probaly be Australia. Courses open all year here. never really too cold.
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MAUI



I spent a week there. That was OK but I had to leave about 40 years too early.
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San Diego is where its at. There are tons of courses to play. The problem is there are a lot of golfers in this city of over a million people so the numerous courses are often crowded.
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Georgia seems great for year round golf, though I just started. I cant attest to the course conditions in the winter, but I know the weather is just fine.
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Hawaii no ka oi, brah! It's the best, no doubt! I lived on the island of Oahu for 3.5 years & actually picked up the game there. 365 days of golf with temperatures that RARELY drop below 65 or rise above 90. Only occasional rain/storms. TONS of golf courses both public and resort, with preferred pricing for residents. In addition, if you want to plan a golf holiday, you take a 30-minute flight to one of the other islands & enjoy the same perks!!! --LBB
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Add Arizona to the list of obious choices

I wouldn't recommend it. Golfing in 110 degree heat isn't too enjoyable. I'd rather be in Cali where its around 85 year round or Hawaii.

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I'am retiring in Oct.and will be a full time resident of Myrtle Beach and will play the year round.I know in the winter I will have a frost delay once in a while but by 10:00am it will be in the 50"s as my buddies down there love to inform me as I'am shoveling snow up here in Long Island.And last but not least there are over 100 courses to choose from so I do not think I will get bored.
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Central Fla - only because you get to golf with me if I let you.
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Awards and Achievements

Yeah, I'd have to say Florida.
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i think Florida is prob. the way to go. I really love Charleston, SC but Florida has more of a metropolitan section than SC does and i think for me to live full time without going nuts, i would have to be there.
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MAUI

Class reply dude

but anyway i live in pacifica California and i play golf all year round,plenty of courses in a 30 mile radius.
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Not as scenic as some of the other destinations, but right here in Southeast Texas (Houston, Beaumont area). Golf all year long, maybe 5 days at or near freezing during the winter. Summer from April through late October.
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Okay. Here's the big question :

How much money do you have?

Hawaii...lovely, I lived there for 5 years...deep pockets are a necessity, and I'm not talking about the greens fees. Southern California...I was born and raised in Huntington Beach CA. Again deep pockets are a necessity, and you better like people, tons of people. Arizona...love it. We plan on retiring there and the best part is...you're still close to CA, and if you'd like...you can always hop on a flight to Hawaii. Florida, very humid during the summer, I love the state, and greens fees are very reasonable for the smaller courses. Good luck!
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I'am retiring in Oct.and will be a full time resident of Myrtle Beach and will play the year round.I know in the winter I will have a frost delay once in a while but by 10:00am it will be in the 50"s as my buddies down there love to inform me as I'am shoveling snow up here in Long Island.And last but not least there are over 100 courses to choose from so I do not think I will get bored.

My long term plan (20 years) would be to head to MB also. Summer are great here in MI, lots and lots of courses to play with low rates, but the winters are too long.

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i need somewhere to golf year round. It's most likely going to end up being

A) Florida, closer to Boca Raton than anywhere else.

B) Charleston, South Carolina

C) Savannah, Georgia

These are three locals that i can golf 365 days a year at.
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