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"Swing like a Pro" by Ralph Mann

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Discuss "Swing like a Pro" by Ralph Mann here.
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One of the biggest differences that this book describes in the Transition Move in the Golf Swing. I have looked at many Swing Vision analyses on You Tube and I have not found one of the current modern players to do what is described:

When the shaft is perpendicular to the ground on the backswing (prior to completion of the backswing), the hips are actually turning back towards the target to increase the tension
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What has helped me cure my slice is the way that the hands are set up at address in the book for the driver (see the "pro" set up versus the Leadbetter set up). The Pro has a more pronounced Reverse K (left arm in relation to the shaft). I set up like the golfers I circled on the Golf Pro Set up Position.

Photos taken from the following site:

http://perfectgolfswingreview.net/AddressSetup.htm
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One of the biggest differences that this book describes in the Transition Move in the Golf Swing. I have looked at many Swing Vision analyses on You Tube and I have not found one of the current modern players to do what is described:

I don't think the hip is turning back toward the target, but the feel of it turning toward the target. If you're trying, for example, to keep you right knee still in the backswing, you would feel your right knee kicking in, right ? without the feeling of right knee kicking in, you actually let your right knee move to the right (for right-hand golfer). Same thing happen here.

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Additionally, to help me learn the swing, I use the screen saver:

I could watch that little animated .gif for hours...

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One of the biggest differences that this book describes in the Transition Move in the Golf Swing. I have looked at many Swing Vision analyses on You Tube and I have not found one of the current modern players to do what is described:

Look harder

almost everybody with irons shots do that ! As said previous poster (it's a feel). Of course it's true for one planer , s/t,... 2 planer with a pause on top don't do that (ref : 2plane for U = reverse K ...) Somebody call's "coil" , start with hips first, ... regards,
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This is perhaps my favourite golf instruction book. It has enough depth to keep pedantic swing tinkerers like myself happy, but doesn't confuse or bore like The Golfing Machine might do if you're not into reading 1960s geometry text books.
I think it's wrong in claiming the imaginary Pro featured has a perfect swing- because it is, after all, an amalgamation of 100 or so imperfect swings.
If in 50 years time, the then top 100 tour players were analysed, and the results were averaged out as they are here, I wouldn't be surprised to find a very different book.

The transition concept is explained very well, but I feel that unless the reader has experienced a similar movement in another sport (say throwing a punch in boxing), it can be hard to replicate from simply reading about it.

My favourite chapter is on the downswing. It explains nicely the different paths golfers take to hit the ball, and what the likely outcomes of the paths are. It's not a subject most golf instruction books / DVDs focus on. It's usually assumed that if you've reached the top of the backswing ok, then there are no problems and you'll hit a peach every time. Obviously that's not the case at all.

All in all, a great book, but don't take it as gospel.
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whether or not you agree with all the premises of the book I think the information on the transition is the best that I have read. It made a huge difference in my game.
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I like this book for the clear instructions and training drills. If you are an absolute beginner you just have to follow along and will improve quite naturally.

I also like the writing style. It's entertaining and professional at the same time.

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Anyone know of a source for the full version of the screen saver? I have the lite version along with the CD and the book and at one time had downloaded the full version but that was 3 laptops ago...

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After a half dozen years I am coming back to "Swing Like a Pro." My swing is very close to being a true single plane swing (what I call a "shoulder plane swing" because the term "single plane" is misleading) but I still need to work on some visualizations, hence back to this book.

Where the book really helped me was on the takeaway. I had problems for decades with the takeaway.

First takeaway problem was something I think I read in a book that when the club moves back to the point the shaft is horizontal, the club face will be vertical and the butt of the club will point in a line parallel to the target. Horrible checkpoint, for me at least. Might work if the hands and club move upward from that point, but I was moving the club farther back in a flat swing. Result was I hit the ball with an open clubface.

Second takeaway problem was from trying to keep the clubhead -- and this applied primarily to the driver but also to any long club -- low to the ground and moving back on the target line for a period to begin the backswing. Think I was taking this idea too literally.

Swing Like a Pro showed me that most good golfers take the club back with the face not vertical at all until much higher in the swing and not with the shaft parallel to the target at any time.

Now I take the club back with basically a shoulder rotation. The club lifts early and nearly on plane with the shoulders. When the shaft is horizontal, the clubface is about 30 deg closed and the butt points way left of target.

Right now, I am reevaluating my neutral grip, based on info in the book, which advises a "strong" grip.
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