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Has anyone tried these Taylormade clones?

41 posts in this topic

TurboPower Ti11 Driver (TaylorMade R11 clone)

TurboPower Ti11 Woods (TaylorMade R11 Fairway clones)

TurboPower Ti11 Hybrids (TaylorMade Rescue clones)

TurboPower Fire 3.0 irons (Taylormade Burner 2.0 iron clones)

Heater 3.0 white Irons (TaylorMade Burner 2.0 iron clones)

Just wanted to say that I'm somewhat of a beginner. I have a set of old, second hand, worn out mixed bag clubs right now, but I'd like to upgrade to something better. After doing some searching and comparing, the Taylormade R11, and Burner 2.0 irons have certainly caught my interest. But with TaylorMade prices so high, I'm gearing toward these clones as my first real set of clubs.

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as a beginner i played with clones because i couldn't tell the difference between good and bad clubs. for the price i was a fan. i am sure lots of guys here would disagree but that is just my opinion.

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Originally Posted by Newcomer

. . .  I'm gearing toward these clones as my first real set of clubs.


A bag of clones would be real clubs compared to your current clubs? How bad are they?

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Originally Posted by sean_miller

A bag of clones would be real clubs compared to your current clubs? How bad are they?

Well... If I had to guess, I'd say they are over 20 years old (some of the irons are Northwestern Tom Shaw Autograph if that says anything, lol).

Quote:

Originally Posted by ZEUS

as a beginner i played with clones because i couldn't tell the difference between good and bad clubs. for the price i was a fan. i am sure lots of guys here would disagree but that is just my opinion.


Thank you for your input... I Just don't want to go out and spend over $500 for a complete set of clubs right now... I'm just getting into taking the game seriously and I can always upgrade my clubs as I progress.

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think about the amount of money you are going to spend on clones. if you are serious about golf you will want a new set in a year and a half probably. why not spend the money now to get a good set that you probably will be spending in a year and a half anyway. you dont need high end equipment to get good at all, but i think there are 3 turns you can make...2 good one bad. the 2 good being used clubs, or new low end clubs from a reputable company. one bad turn would be "clones" like these. The pinemeadow are very nice, but what your looking at is no where near that in my opinion. The adams set you posted would be a perfect starter set. goodluck.

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Just a word of advice.  I was in the same boat as you at the beginning of last season, in fact, I have a post on here regarding clones that got a crap load of input from people.  I purchased a set of clone Ping G10 irons for under $200 bucks and 3 weeks later I found a real G10 set on craigslist that was barely used for $250.  So, I actually spent more money than I initially wanted to.  I say that, to say this.... go ahead and browse the market for a lightly used set of quality clubs for your first set and save yourself the second guessing that WILL come when you buy clones, depsite how the club functions.  I still believe clones are "good enough" clubs, but I must admit that the real thing does feel/fly a bit better (could be mental though).

Heck, I'm thinking about selling my Pings now and getting AP2s.  Good thing is, I will be able to get all of my money back for my Pings, maybe even make a little.

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I’m new here but not new to club making. There is no one answer to if clones are as good as the brand names or not.

Historically when forged irons were the benchmark of quality clubs it was all in the quality of the steel and the makers ability to match the right shaft to achive best swing weight and lie for the individual player. When investment castings for irons and wood heads came in to vogue is when it became practical for cones to compete with major brands.

The reason for this is that almost none of the major brands actually cast their heads. The major brands will design the head then turn the proof over to a foundry to produce the raw casting. This has lead to a lot of copies made by the foundries with lesser grade casting materials and sold to the clone market for a fraction of the price they are paid by the brand name club companies. Typically the major brands will trademark and or paten the major features to prevent copping of proprietary designs. However one single small change in the features of the irons overall design can keep a cone company outside the patens restrictions.

There are very good clones, there are cones that actually better playing clubs for a given section of the market and then there are really bad clones. In this day and age most clones in the ½ off the brand name price range tend to be pretty good clubs over all. The ones that are in the 1/3rd of brand name price range are hit and miss and the ones less than 1/3 rd the price tend to be crap. Back in the day when the majority of Golfsmith’s business was cloning clubs they set the standard for quality clones by engineering their clones honestly compete with the major brands. However they saw the ever changing technology revolution coming and got out of the clone market for the most part while the getting was good.

All this said you can take a top quality clone set of irons and with detailed attention to weighting and fitting you can make a set of irons worthy of praise. But that is the real key that most Sunday golfers forget. Even the brand name manufactures build clubs built for a 5’11”, 190lb player with ground to wrist distance of 35”-35 ½” and a swing speed with a driver of 80-90mph. So if you don’t fit very closely in this niche then the clubs regardless if clone of major brand don’t really fit you ideally. One of the biggest issues I see in regards to mid to high handicap players is shaft flex and shaft length. Everyone wants XS printed on the label of a 46 ½” driver shaft. Even when they are 5’8, 135lb and have 75 mph driver club head speed. Macho will always be macho even at their own expense.

So here is my take. If you want to save some money find a top raked clone you like at about 1/2 the price of a top line major brand. Buy just the heads and then go to your local club maker and have them fit the clubs to you and your swing. You will end up paying about ¼ (or more) less than the cost the major brand names and have a set of clubs that you can swing consistently. What I am saying it is just as important to spend a bit of money to get your clubs fitted to your body and swing speed as it is to buy a good club. Regardless if it is a clone or a brand name.

By the way fitting is something that really needs to be done in person. IMO fitting by internet is an oxymoron.

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I started playing late in life and I could buy what I thought was the best. I bought Ping I3 irons w/custom fitting, reg.shaft, and Ping 10.5 degree driver. I had been playing cheap clubs. I expected my game to improve. It didn't. The irons had so much draw I had to aim almost off the fairway. I had made a mistake. I sold the clubs at a 50% loss. In the last 15 years I have played only clone clubs. I now "build" my own. The problem with buying clubs is that there is so many factors involved. The most important thing is the shaft. It all depends on your swing. I hit the ball very low with a low draw for irons but fade a driver. For me, I had to go to a very low torque (3,5 or less). shaft to prevent fading my driver. It took me three drivers and four sets of irons to maximize my game. I couldn't afford to buy that many name brand clubs. Now I use a Tour model T11 (Taylormade clone) with a 12 degree loft. I use a 3.5 low torque shaft with a low kick. The best driver shaft for me is a Tour model 63oz,. low kick with 3.5 degree torque. It cost only $29. The head cost $46 at Momark Golf. You don't need to spend a small fortune on clubs to play good golf if you can determine what type of club will work for you I now play T11 Taylormade clone irons.also..
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Originally Posted by Newcomer

TurboPower Ti11 Driver (TaylorMade R11 clone)

About a month ago, I saw a guy hitting one of those drivers on our driving range.   The sound at impact was absolutely HORRIBLE.   It sounded like he was hitting balls with a soda can..

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I purchased the Ti11 from Monark Golf just as the last comment stated. He is correct. I even joke that I am hitting with a Folger's coffee can on a stick. I hate the sound. With that said, I have never hit a driver longer or straighter. I am 5' 9' tall with a swing speed just a tick under 100. I can consistently drive the ball 290+ with boomers in the 320 range with the right conditions. I joke with my gof buddies about the sound. They say wear earplugs and enjoy the view. Take it for what it is worth.

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Originally Posted by poble

with a swing speed just a tick under 100. I can consistently drive the ball 290+ with boomers in the 320 range with the right conditions.

no you dont.

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Originally Posted by colin007

no you dont.

+1

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I have a 83 MPH and can drive it 400 yards on 18 at Kapalua with a 50 MPH wind at my back. A 100 MPH swing speed might hit it 250 on a level hole with no wind, 290 you're dreaming.

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