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What is the real difference between Titleist Prov1 and Prov1x Balls

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I'm a beginner been doing a mix of pitch and putt and golf for about 2 months. I want to move onto using the titleist balls fully now but what is the difference between a Prov1 and a Prov1x? And also what about the DT Solos? whats the differences.

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ProV1x spins less than the ProV1. But I find both of them spin more than most balls. On courses with firmer greens where I need more spin to be able to hold the green I'll use the ProV1. On softer greens where I don't need as much spin I'll use the ProV1x.

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if u look here the prov1x spins more than the prov1 apprently. although i cant cross my heart hope to die on the validty of this

Originally Posted by DaSportsGuy

ProV1x spins less than the ProV1. But I find both of them spin more than most balls. On courses with firmer greens where I need more spin to be able to hold the green I'll use the ProV1. On softer greens where I don't need as much spin I'll use the ProV1x.



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If you don't really compress the ball much when you swing, I don't think either of them are worth any more than a Top Flite.

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I think one of the NXT balls should be next choice for you if you want to play a Titleist ball.  NXTs are actually good balls.  I had a senior PGA pro tell me he should be playing the NXT according to his swing speed, but he went to the Bridgestone 330 RS instead.  At least I think that was the ball, it is the softer Bridgestone for slightly slower swing speeds.  I cannot vouch for the accuracy of the statement but a launch monitor guy told me the ProV1 and ProV1x balls really needed at least a 105 mph swing speed to get the performance they are capable of delivering.  I am just slightly below that, but like the flight of the ProV1x.  Both ProVs seem to spin about the same for me.

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The Pro V1 has a softer feel and higher spin rate then the Pro V1x..  I normally use the Pro V1x because of less spin and lower ball flight.. However, I usually only use the Pro V1x when I'm playing in mid season form.. In the spring when I'm trying to knock the rust off my aching bones, I like the NXT tour as an affordable cheaper back up..  The only significant difference I notice is the spin I get off wedge shots, or chips.. The Pro V1x will dance a lot more then the NXT tour around the greens..

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To be honest if you are just starting out you are probably going to see very little difference between something like a SoLo or NXT and a ProV1/x, let alone the difference between V1 and V1x. You are going to lose a few so I'd recommend buying lake balls rather than shelling out on brand new pro level balls at  >£2 a ball.

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Originally Posted by RC

I think one of the NXT balls should be next choice for you if you want to play a Titleist ball.  NXTs are actually good balls.  I had a senior PGA pro tell me he should be playing the NXT according to his swing speed, but he went to the Bridgestone 330 RS instead.  At least I think that was the ball, it is the softer Bridgestone for slightly slower swing speeds.  I cannot vouch for the accuracy of the statement but a launch monitor guy told me the ProV1 and ProV1x balls really needed at least a 105 mph swing speed to get the performance they are capable of delivering.  I am just slightly below that, but like the flight of the ProV1x.  Both ProVs seem to spin about the same for me.


I'm not so sure about this statement either. Seems to me that most of the gals on the LPGA Tour swing slower than 105 mph yet many of use ProV or ProV1x. To me the 2 most important characteristics of a ball is 1) how it feels coming off the putter and 2) how it spins on short iron/wedge shots. The distance I get from the ProV's off the driver/3 wood is what it is and it's enough for me. Frankly I can't tell much of a difference in feel between balls (even at different price points) coming off woods/hybrids/mid irons. But anything inside 140....ohhh baby! Nothing feels as sweet as hitting a low spinning shot to a back left pin! And with all respect to Top Flite there is no way I'm going to hit that shot with a TF.

I agree with your take on the NXT. I play them in early and late in the season when the course conditions wane a bit.

To the OP, one bit of advice I would second is as a relatively new player you will more than likely going to lose quite a few balls before your hitting them a bit straighter. Because of the the cost of ProV's may be a bit much. But with that said and if you can afford it by all means play ProV's. IMO it's in the short game where the differences in golf balls really become apparent. The one thing I have always told newer players when the ask which ball is "best" is to take some time on the putting green with several and get to know the feel and determine which one you like best. Don't worry about which ball is longest off the tee. You will get your distance from solid contact and when you achieve that than all golf balls will be long.



Originally Posted by Losttsol

If you don't really compress the ball much when you swing, I don't think either of them are worth any more than a Top Flite.



There is a world of difference but it's in the short game, not so much off the driver IMO.


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The Pro V1 is designed to spin more with a higher trajectory than the Pro V1x.  In essence, you give up a little distance for enhanced spin.  One additional thing that I will add to this discussion has to do with the ProV(1x) and side spin.  Side spin makes the ball go sideways and a ProV(1x) will go sideways harder.  Aside from cost, that is why beginners should steer clear of this type of ball.

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ProV1 /x practice balls are a cheaper alternative to the 2011 versions.  I play those (practice balls) and I buy them new for $32 (including tax) at Golfsmiths. While I really do like the feel of the 2011 ProV1 better (it has a "crispness" similar to the debut version of the x), the feel differential is not enough to convince me to spend $50+ per dozen for now.

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"In essence, you give up a little distance for enhanced spin. One additional thing that I will add to this discussion has to do with the ProV(1x) and side spin. Side spin makes the ball go sideways and a ProV(1x) will go sideways harder..." (MybloodinVt)

I have been playing the ProV1x for the past three years.  Purchasing the Pro V1x (X-outs) are a whole lot cheaper than $50 per dozen of the regular Pro V1's.  The side-spin on the Pro V1x is huge compared to the Pro V1.  And, it has taken me 2.75 years to discover this.

I am no longer hitting shots hard to the left or right when using the Pro V1.  My distance is about the same off the tee and with 8 iron through GW.  The back-spin is a mystery to me.  While the Pro V1 is supposed to spin more than the Pro V1x, I am finding the opposite to be true.  Chipping the ball off of a tight lie is a good way to determine how each ball behaves on the greens for me.  I use a 54/8 sandwedge to chip and the Pro V1x hits and stops faster than the Pro V1. How is that possible?

I am a 5.1 GHIN.

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I play the NXT tour S and it serves the purpose just fine.  It spins enough to hop and stop, sometimes back up a little, and feels great(just like a proV1, Zstar, or any other tour ball I've played) off the putter.  I advise anyone who's NOT sure about PRO V's to try the Tour S ball first.  You might end up liking it and saving yourself a little cash.
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As a beginner, I wouldnt even consider a ball like the Pro V1.  You dont swing hard enough and dont hit the ball solidly enough to need a tour ball.  When you get to a 10 handicap or lower, then by all means go with whatever you want but for a high-handicapper a tour ball is only going to hurt your game.

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I never liked the, "If you're not a this, play a that." statement. Try a few different brands/balls. Find one you like. Play that ball.
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Originally Posted by ggolokin

if u look here the prov1x spins more than the prov1 apprently. although i cant cross my heart hope to die on the validty of this

According to that the Bridgestone E5 is one of the highest spinning balls on the market, above their tour balls.

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I tested several tour balls around the green a few years ago and the e5 was head and shoulders above all of them.

Titleist is now advertising on TV that the ProVI and ProVIX are suitable for all golfers. They would say that, wouldn't they?

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Originally Posted by The Recreational Golfer

Titleist is now advertising on TV that the ProVI and ProVIX are suitable for all golfers. They would say that, wouldn't they?

They've been saying that for years on their website. They also say that there is only a 4-5 yard distance differential between any of their balls.From Titleist.com:

"All Titleist golf balls are long and the distance differences between models is just 4-5 yards."

If I said, "Ball fitting for swing speed is a myth.", no doubt I'd be jumped on like a pack of jackals on a dead elephant. I'll let Titleist say it - whether it's marketing or not is for you to decide:

"Ball fitting for swing speed is a myth. A golf ball must perform for all golfers of all swing speeds on all shots, otherwise it won’t perform for any golfer. A PGA Tour player’s driver swing speed is higher than most amateurs. Yet his speed on long or mid-irons may be similar to your driver swing speed. A Titleist golf ball will perform as well on your drives as it does on the PGA player’s iron shots. The golf ball just reacts to the force at impact and Titleist golf balls perform for all swing speeds on all shots."

For more - http://www.titleist.com/golf-ball-fitting/ . Before someone slams me for overlooking the spinning characteristics of a ball off driver, I didn't.

I particularly like the comparison of LPGA players to male amateurs - much more real than comparing PGA tour pros to us.

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Originally Posted by The Recreational Golfer

I tested several tour balls around the green a few years ago and the e5 was head and shoulders above all of them.

Titleist is now advertising on TV that the ProVI and ProVIX are suitable for all golfers. They would say that, wouldn't they?

You know, thinking about it again, I probably agree with you about the E5. I had a 25% off coupon at Dunham's and got a dozen Pro V1's and used them the last two times I went out. Even on my full 60* shots I didn't get anything to stop dead or come back a bit. In fact, with the Pro V1's they would roll out a good foot or two and about 5-6 feet with my 7 iron.

And I don't think it was green conditions because they were fairly soft, yet firm.

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