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Open-Faced Club Sandwedge

Adjustable Drivers

10 posts in this topic

My current driver, a Cobra L4V 9-degree, seems like it doesn't have enough loft for my swing.  I have a relatively high swing speed (drives I hit well go 270-280), but my most solid drives don't seem to have enough hang-time to get all the yardage they should get.

I know getting a fitting is probably the answer I'll get from a lot of you, but I'm not entirely happy with that idea because I change my swing a lot; I'm a bit of a tinkerer.  I'd like my driver to fit me better, but I don't want to pay to get it fit only to find out next season that I've improved my swing enough that I no longer have the right fit.

Are adjustable drivers the answer?  I don't mind an expensive driver, provided it lasts me more than two or three seasons.  I don't have much interest in changing the face angle; I don't see how closing the face to turn a slice into a pull (or opening to turn a hook into a push) would be a good thing; instead I like to tweak my mechanics until my swing path is right.  But I do want the ability to change the loft to tweak my trajectory.

Are my reservations about a driver fitting vs. adjustable drivers unfounded?

Among adjustable drivers, any recommendations?  I have a pretty conventional, fundamentally-solid swing for a high-handicapper (short game's horrendous), but forgiveness in the form of a large sweet spot is something I value.  Any input is appreciated.

-Andrew

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I'm gaming the R11, which despite the white head that I had reservations about, I really like. However, I'm not one to adjust his club a lot, so mine is still on Normal for all settings. If you're looking for something you can tinker with, the R11 tinkers well :P.

However, the engine of your club is the shaft and getting yourself fit for a proper shaft should help your drives more than an adjustable club in my opinion.

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I myself like the titleist 910 for it looks and feel. I am currently playing a cobra s2 which i payed only a 100 for but sadly on really focuses on face angle. My opinion 910d2 or maybe the r9 460 because I really dislike the white.

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910D2 would be my choice.  Much prefer the 910 line to the R11 models.

Honestly though, I would save the money and focus on your short game.  If your short game is horrendous like you say it is, then you will notice far more significant improvements in your score if you figure out your short game.  Hitting a ball as far as possible off the tee doesn't mean crap if your short game is weak.

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I love my 910fd fairway wood, i am thinking of getting the 910d3 driver in the near future for next year. I love the feel of that club, its great. I like the fact i can adjust the loft. really to me adjustability is very low on my list, ping does a good job with there customizable process to really to take away the need for adjustability, but for look and feel, the 910 is a great driver.

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Even though you mentioned you don't really want to get fitted. I think you should try it. The head of the driver and the loft are more than likely OK. The shaft may be the cause of your problems. Getting fit with a shaft with the right stiffness and a higher trajectory may fix your problems. But if your set on an adjustable driver, try the Adams Speedline 9064LS with DFS. I play the 9064LS but without the adjust ability of the DFS, and its a very nice club. Very forgiving, great distance, and good trajectory.
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Originally Posted by GJBenn85

910D2 would be my choice.  Much prefer the 910 line to the R11 models.

Honestly though, I would save the money and focus on your short game.  If your short game is horrendous like you say it is, then you will notice far more significant improvements in your score if you figure out your short game.  Hitting a ball as far as possible off the tee doesn't mean crap if your short game is weak.


Regarding saving the money and focusing on my short game, instead I think I'm going to spend the money, and focus on my short game ;)  I know my short game is the part of my game where I need the most practice, and so I fully intend to do just that, but I also feel that my driver is the part of my game that could benefit the most from an equipment change, so I intend to do that also.

Regarding the 910D2, I do like what I read about that club.

And hitting a ball as far as possible does mean crap, even if your short game is weak; hitting that great-looking drive and blowing past your playing partners by 50 yards feels really good.  And truthfully, I play golf to feel good; not specifically to score as low as possible (although a lower score feels good too, don't get me wrong).

-Andrew

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Originally Posted by Laws of Woo

Even though you mentioned you don't really want to get fitted. I think you should try it. The head of the driver and the loft are more than likely OK. The shaft may be the cause of your problems. Getting fit with a shaft with the right stiffness and a higher trajectory may fix your problems.



That's something I hadn't really thought about before posting this thread, but it seems like a salient point.  Perhaps what I need to do is go through the fitting process, and determine what all the variables are that suit me best, including the shaft variables, and then maybe go for an adjustable driver with a shaft that fits me well.  Also, since different drivers are adjustable in different ways, it would probably be good to know which dimension makes the most difference in the results I'm getting.  It could be that loft really isn't as important as I'm thinking, and what I really need is a different shaft and/or swing weight, for instance.

-Andrew

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Originally Posted by Open-Faced Club Sandwedge

hitting that great-looking drive and blowing past your playing partners by 50 yards feels really good.  And truthfully, I play golf to feel good; not specifically to score as low as possible (although a lower score feels good too, don't get me wrong).

-Andrew


Then who cares about adjustability if your objective is just to blow a drive past your buddies and feel good about it.  Ego's are cheap and easier to come by than a good game is.

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Quote:

Then who cares about adjustability if your objective is just to blow a drive past your buddies and feel good about it.  Ego's are cheap and easier to come by than a good game is.



Well, that's not my only objective.  It's just one of my objectives.  Also, even if it was my only objective, having the ability to fine-tune my driver to hit better and better drives, more and more consistently, would feed my ego all the better.  And the consistency thing will help my scores, too.  Just not as much as my short game lessons and practice will.

-Andrew

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