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davebemis

Back weight golf grips.

18 posts in this topic

While reading through some Golf Digest articles online this morning, I read one about back weight grips: http://www.golfdigest.com/golf-equipment/blogs/newstuff/2012/01/back-weight-your-golf-clubs-wi.html

apparently the grip weighs 92 grams which is more than a traditional grip. Because of that, when you're at the top of your swing, it adds more mass, helps the transition into the slot a lot easier, and in some cases added 4 miles per hour to ball speed. The only downfall, is they're selling for $18.99 a pop. Anyone out there try it already or something like it? To me it's hard to justify spending $18.99 per grip compared to the Golf Pride Tour Wrap 2G that I use for $3 each just for 4 miles per hour more on ball speed.

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Originally Posted by davebemis

While reading through some Golf Digest articles online this morning, I read one about back weight grips: http://www.golfdigest.com/golf-equipment/blogs/newstuff/2012/01/back-weight-your-golf-clubs-wi.html

apparently the grip weighs 92 grams which is more than a traditional grip. Because of that, when you're at the top of your swing, it adds more mass, helps the transition into the slot a lot easier, and in some cases added 4 miles per hour to ball speed. The only downfall, is they're selling for $18.99 a pop. Anyone out there try it already or something like it? To me it's hard to justify spending $18.99 per grip compared to the Golf Pride Tour Wrap 2G that I use for $3 each just for 4 miles per hour more on ball speed.



I'd be curious how that was tested. My experience is that any slight change in equipment that makes me think about mechanics will make me swing with more purpose for a few swings. Then my natural tempo takes over, and if it doesn't then the result is probably a wider shot dispersion. A higher ball speed with tighter dispersion would be great, but it never seems to work out that way. And no, I wouldn't use $19 grips unless they had a lifetime warranty.

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Originally Posted by davebemis

While reading through some Golf Digest articles online this morning, I read one about back weight grips: http://www.golfdigest.com/golf-equipment/blogs/newstuff/2012/01/back-weight-your-golf-clubs-wi.html

apparently the grip weighs 92 grams which is more than a traditional grip. Because of that, when you're at the top of your swing, it adds more mass, helps the transition into the slot a lot easier, and in some cases added 4 miles per hour to ball speed. The only downfall, is they're selling for $18.99 a pop. Anyone out there try it already or something like it? To me it's hard to justify spending $18.99 per grip compared to the Golf Pride Tour Wrap 2G that I use for $3 each just for 4 miles per hour more on ball speed.



For 4 miles an hour increase, it would be worth it imo, could be 10 yards more.  But I find it hard to believe the average guy is going to swing that much faster and I like Sean's point about how the change can effect the motion

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Originally Posted by mvmac

For 4 miles an hour increase, it would be worth it imo, could be 10 yards more.  But I find it hard to believe the average guy is going to swing that much faster and I like Sean's point about how the change can effect the motion


Ball speed tends to be 1:1.5 ratio, clubhead speed the 1:2.5. So this is about six yards with the driver.

I don't know that I buy it. Swingweight decreases (as would clubhead control for many), but the overall weight of the club goes up.

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Originally Posted by iacas

Ball speed tends to be 1:1.5 ratio, clubhead speed the 1:2.5. So this is about six yards with the driver.

I don't know that I buy it. Swingweight decreases (as would clubhead control for many), but the overall weight of the club goes up.

Good to know

Ok then for 6 yards I'll pay $14 a grip

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Think about it for a minute. Is it easier to control / hold a weight in your hands or on the end of a shaft? Will it allow a more balanced swing, since the weight is more evenly distributed along the entire length of the shaft? You thoughts? Back weights can be purchased in different styles / types for a lot less money.

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Just add lead tape to the butt end of the grip prior to re-gripping.  It's easy to figure out what works for you - simply try some on the but end of the club on the out side of the grip while you're at the range.  you can adjust how much you really want - then specify that to your grip guys.  more than about 4 turns will require some finisse to get the grip back n but they can also space it out a bit is it's an issue.

I've used 2 turns  on all clubs for 15 years, 3 for the driver and am content with the results - easier transition at the top of the backswing , better hand feel, less hand stress, ( I have weak hands) and a bit more distance , and feeling of control ( your mileage may vary)

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For those of you who are more adventurous - try adding a lot of weight to BOTH the head and grip - maintaining a low swing weight, increasing the weight of the head - which can be another variable in improving distance see if you can find a new optimum - fun / easy to try you''ll learn something about your swing - guaranteed

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I've got a product that will backweight your grips, stiffen your shafts, flatten your lie angle, lower your swingweight, AND promote accuracy through easier center contact!

It's called a piece of tape.  Wrap it around the end of your grip and place your hands beneath it.

In all seriousness, though, Jack Nicklaus was said to use backweighted clubs so there will always be a camp in favor of this concept; however, equipment has changed a lot since then.

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I'm in favor of backweighting for a putter. It does improve putting touch. But there's a difference between putting and a full swing.

I am more curious if this is a result of the clubs overall becoming lighter for amateurs. I wonder since the advent of light steel shafts, that amateurs are having a problem with control. So back weighting gives some of the weight back for the irons.

Also, a heavier club will not effect the ball that much, a heavier club head will.

Even still, how much mph are you loosing by increasing the weight. I am sure its something to test out. My only concern is that if you mess with the swing weight to much, does that throw off the swing.

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I'm in favor of backweighting for a putter. It does improve putting touch.

… for some people. If I could only add weight to the head or the grip I'd add it to the head of the modern putter. A bit OT so I'm done now. :)

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This was addressed awhile back when someone brought up "The Secret". At the time, I experimented taping 3 nickels  and 1 penny taped to the end of a grip with electrical tape. This adds about 16 grams of weight. Of course with the Boccieri grip, the overall weight is also heavier.  I can not definitively say it made any difference other than mentally.  I did take advantage of the on-line coupon and had that grip placed on my driver at Golf Galaxy, and for whatever reason, I will admit to having more confidence with the driver. .  "Is it real, or is it Memorex?"  (remember that commercial?).

As mentioned earlier, adding weight to the grip end will decrease the swing weight of the assembled golf club. When I worked at Titleist, some customers would request an extra wrap or two of tape to the grip to change the swing weight a little  say from a D3 to a D2 1/2.   Same would go for "tipping" a shaft, or cutting a shaft from the butt end. It would change the swing weight.  Had to be careful with steel shafts as it would also change the step pattern, kick  point, e.t.c.

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just go to either (both) of these sites and read along.

been doing this for 5=6 years now, makes a big difference when properly fitted by the right club maker. a lot cheaper than your $19/per

added club head speed, ball speed, distance, but most of all narrowed dispersion so i'm more accurate. also, for what it's worth, the weight was different for 4-PW, than for the wedges.

hope it helps

http://www.balance-certified.com

http://www.tourlockpro.com

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I have tried one of these grips, the Secret on a 58* wedge.  That's not exactly a true experiment, is it?

It is very interesting and it definitely changes the feel of the club, which isn't a bad thing for a change of pace.  My guess is that it will slightly increase the overall weight, lower the swing weight, and stiffen the shaft a bit - stiffer shafts are not what most of us need.  I do find it helps  a little with proper cocking of the hands, swing plane (MOI), and extension, assuming you start off pretty well. I would put this on a practice club or on a 15th club for practice rounds, just to see.  If you are not physically strong, forget this.

Overall, I would recommend a ribbed grip over this product.

Oh, and importantly, get the proper grip size for your hands and for your natural, swing action (thinner for slicers with little or no wrist/arm rotation and a little thicker for hookers (over rotators, albeit rare, and flippers).

This grip may help a great or better swing, but it will do little or nothing for a beginner or intermediate player IMO.

Does anyone know about the Toney Penna grip?   Built up in the right hand (instead of taper) to slow down the right hand rotation and/or flip.

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I cannot remember the name of the grip I used, but this was back in 1989ish.  Golfsmith sold Tour Model II's (the Ping Eye 2 knockoff).  I was having a HUGE problem releasing through the ball, and had a huge problem trying to keep my wrist "cupped" (which is what we called it back then).  I tried and tried practicing rotation drills but nothing worked.  Someone at Golfsmith recommended the weighted grip (all the weight was on the tip of the grip) and I'm here to tell you, that thing worked.  He even said not to use it forever.  Just long enough to get the feel of releasing your hands through the swing.  I never had a casting problem. In fact, quite the opposite.  For those in a similar situation, it can help.  Just remember. Putting a band aid on your swing won't fix it.

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I'm certainly no expert on the effects of changes in weight at the grip and/or head of a club.  However, this being the internet, I'll express my opinion anyhow, and in this case I think there may be some validity.  As most have probably noticed, just about all of the club makers are going to great lengths (no pun intended) to get this year's model to be "The longest ever!"  And those manufacturers do have people that are intimately familiar with the science of club weighting and how changes will affect ball speed.  I cannot imagine that TaylorMade, Callaway, Cleveland, etc. etc. would overlook adding a bit of weight to the grip if it would really add distance for the average person shopping for a new set of sticks.  Sorry, ain't buying it.

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Overall, I would recommend a ribbed grip over this product.

Ribbed for her pleasure? :-P

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pirate jim et.al. -

c'mon, that's every year marketing hype, you shouldn't be fooled by that and make the leap to counter weighting. if we bought a new driver every year and increased 15+ yds, we'd all be hitting it 500 yds. by now.

first off, they're searching for more distance by repositioning the center of gravity in the head combined with lighter and longer shafts to increase club head speed. plus your talking drivers vs. irons and they're different.

for irons - the benefits of counter weighting come not from just adding weight, otherwise 60g would be 15x farther than 4g by that logic. it's beneficial because when fitted properly, in enhances and increases hitting the ball on the face, thereby greater ball speed, less dispersion = longer distance.

besides, why be a skeptic when it's so easy (and free) to test it for yourself with a trained and reputable club fitter. since most people probably subscribe to a "prove it to me" type of theory, if it doesn't work for you, don't do it. i've been fitted for it three times in the last 5 years and each time it's proven beneficial (and the same weight). with different clubs 2 of the 3 times.

just find a fitter who has trackman and/or flightscope radar.  take your 6i and hit 15-20 shots with no counter weight, that's your baseline. then do the same with 4, 6, 8 and 12 gram counterweights. compare the average data of: club head speed, ball speed, distance, angle of club face at impact and dispersion, etc.  if nothing is better than your baseline, it doesn't work for you. if one of the weights improves these numbers, put them in. it's that simple.

for me personally, the optimum weight produces much more consistent square face at impact, 2mph of club head speed, 3-5mph of ball speed and 3-5 yds of distance. on the course it translated to more consistent distances and the misses were much closer to the intended line. therefore, more confidence overall

my fitter does this for free, no change, no charge. if there's a change, he only charges for the weights and installation and not the fitting. seems like a win to me.

lastly, two of the best ball strikers ever readily admit to using them, nicklaus and sergio garcia, so there just may be something to it.

just my $.02

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