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TheWhacker

Loft gap between Driver and 3 wood?

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Hello all, I am in the market for a new set of clubs and specifically interesting in gaming a High Loft Driver (11.5-13*) along with a 15* 3 wood.  At the moment I am really keen on the 13* Nike VRS but am wondering if that would be too close to loft of the 3 wood?  It seems logical that it would not matter owing to shaft length and the huge difference in head sizes in the VRS line (460cc to 177cc). Any insight would be appreciated.

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If you're going with a high loft driver, you might benefit from a 17* 4W rather a 15* 3W. Golf Digest reports that the average golfer hits a 4W better than a 3W.

I swapped out FWs this summer. An OK hit with my new 17* 4W goes about 10 yards farther than an excellent hit with my old 15* 3W. (RBZ actually calls this 17* a 3W.HL - high launch - ... hey, it's a 4W and it works great)

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I have floated that idea of the 4W around. A buddy of mine actually has the RBZ HL 3W and he also has no complaints whatsoever.  Ever since I started playing golf, I have always went with a 3W and a 2 iron so its hard to get that out that mindset.

Although if I go 4W, I could drop in an extra wedge. Something else to obsess over now.

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If you go with the 11.5, I think a 3wood in the 15-16* range would be fine. Any higher loft on the driver and I'd go for the 17* 4wood.

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Originally Posted by WUTiger

If you're going with a high loft driver, you might benefit from a 17* 4W rather a 15* 3W.  Golf Digest reports that the average golfer hits a 4W better than a 3W.

I swapped out FWs this summer. An OK hit with my new 17* 4W goes about 10 yards farther than an excellent hit with my old 15* 3W. (RBZ actually calls this 17* a 3W.HL - high launch - ... hey, it's a 4W and it works great)

I like the above suggestion.

2i? Drop it and keep the wedge.

Of course, you could do an adjustable 4 wood and the loft could go higher or lower.

11.5

17

3i

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I have an adjustable driver that when set to neutral is a 10.5 degrees and my 3 wood is 15.  I also have a 3+ 14 degree hybrid that's sized closer to a fairway wood.  I prefer it to my 3 wood at this time because I can hit it higher and stop it quicker.  The 3 wood is out of the bag for a while.

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Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond

I like the above suggestion.

2i? Drop it and keep the wedge.

Of course, you could do an adjustable 4 wood and the loft could go higher or lower.

11.5

17

3i

Yeah I know, I know with the 2i.  My first set was a old set of hand me down blades from my grandfather and then as I got better, I was gifted a some new (at the time) cavity back 2-PW set. Got pretty good at ripping stingers with that thing but I know I need to evolve!

I was kicking around the pro shop yesterday and looked what Bridgestone has to offer.  They didnt have a the J40 445 driver in 12* or the 16* 4W (maybe they are flying off the shelves).  I did manage to swing the Dual cavity irons and it felt great.  Anyone have experience with the woods by any chance?  I was told that the stock shaft is a real deal Project X, not sure if that will suit but that makes me assume that Bridgestone has higher standard of quality.  Again any help will be appreciated,  I am new to club hoing as I have seen it referred to on here.

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Originally Posted by TheWhacker

Yeah I know, I know with the 2i.  My first set was a old set of hand me down blades from my grandfather and then as I got better, I was gifted a some new (at the time) cavity back 2-PW set. Got pretty good at ripping stingers with that thing but I know I need to evolve!

I was kicking around the pro shop yesterday and looked what Bridgestone has to offer.  They didnt have a the J40 445 driver in 12* or the 16* 4W (maybe they are flying off the shelves).  I did manage to swing the Dual cavity irons and it felt great.  Anyone have experience with the woods by any chance?  I was told that the stock shaft is a real deal Project X, not sure if that will suit but that makes me assume that Bridgestone has higher standard of quality.  Again any help will be appreciated,  I am new to club hoing as I have seen it referred to on here.

Here are a couple of links:

http://thesandtrap.com/b/bag_drop/bridgestone_reveals_new_j40_drivers_fairways_hybrids

http://www.golfwrx.com/11643/j40-bridgestone-fairway-wood-16-degreeproject-x-6-0-shaft/

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Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond

Here are a couple of links:

http://thesandtrap.com/b/bag_drop/bridgestone_reveals_new_j40_drivers_fairways_hybrids

http://www.golfwrx.com/11643/j40-bridgestone-fairway-wood-16-degreeproject-x-6-0-shaft/

Awesome, thanks for the links. I will definitely have to check those out

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Originally Posted by TheWhacker

I have floated that idea of the 4W around. A buddy of mine actually has the RBZ HL 3W and he also has no complaints whatsoever.  Ever since I started playing golf, I have always went with a 3W and a 2 iron so its hard to get that out that mindset.

Although if I go 4W, I could drop in an extra wedge. Something else to obsess over now.

Either you're hitting a 2-iron very well or a 3-wood very poorly to not have 3w-2i as your gap and bag setup query.  If it's the former, then a high lofted driver seems like an odd choice.

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Originally Posted by sean_miller

el

Either you're hitting a 2-iron very well or a 3-wood very poorly to not have 3w-2i as your gap and bag setup query.  If it's the former, then a high lofted driver seems like an odd choice.

I wouldnt say I hit the 3 wood poorly but it the one I am most likely to be inconsistent if I were to be completely honest.  I do hit the 2i well, its a Tommy Armour 845 oversize which I have to say is really easy to hit. I am not going to say that I can hit every 2 iron though.  My trajectory with these two in particular is pretty low though.

I apologize for my title not being perfect.  I was just looking for some basics thoughts on loft differences between driver and 3W, but decided to follow up on the 4W suggestion.  I do plan on getting fitted but I like to have some ideas before I get that done.

As for the higher lofted driver, I have read some interesting theories on driver set-up and one that caught my attention was high lofted head with lower launch/spin shaft.  Basically, the ball with launch high owing to the extra loft but the shaft will keep it from ballooning.  I know at one point Nick Watney had a similar set up with a 11.5* head (not sure if he stills goes this route). It may not work for me but hey it can not hurt to look into it.

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Originally Posted by TheWhacker

Quote:

Originally Posted by sean_miller

el

Either you're hitting a 2-iron very well or a 3-wood very poorly to not have 3w-2i as your gap and bag setup query.  If it's the former, then a high lofted driver seems like an odd choice.

I wouldnt say I hit the 3 wood poorly but it the one I am most likely to be inconsistent if I were to be completely honest.  I do hit the 2i well, its a Tommy Armour 845 oversize which I have to say is really easy to hit. I am not going to say that I can hit every 2 iron though.  My trajectory with these two in particular is pretty low though.

I apologize for my title not being perfect.  I was just looking for some basics thoughts on loft differences between driver and 3W, but decided to follow up on the 4W suggestion.  I do plan on getting fitted but I like to have some ideas before I get that done.

As for the higher lofted driver, I have read some interesting theories on driver set-up and one that caught my attention was high lofted head with lower launch/spin shaft.  Basically, the ball with launch high owing to the extra loft but the shaft will keep it from ballooning.  I know at one point Nick Watney had a similar set up with a 11.5* head (not sure if he stills goes this route). It may not work for me but hey it can not hurt to look into it.

A GI 2-iron is probably easier to hit than a 5-wood, so it makes sense. A lot of professionals use higher lofted drivers than we amateurs think. Not everyone swings it like Phil and Bubba. Good luck.

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Originally Posted by sean_miller

A GI 2-iron is probably easier to hit than a 5-wood, so it makes sense. A lot of professionals use higher lofted drivers than we amateurs think. Not everyone swings it like Phil and Bubba. Good luck.

Thanks, I was shocked when I first heard that some guys had lofts over 9*.  After going to few PGA events, my concept of trajectory has changed quite a bit too.

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If your looking for a VERY reliable and EASY to hit club off the tee...WITHOUT loosing distance...try the RBZ 3W Tour model. It's a 13* degree loft that will rival most drivers for distance AND control!

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Mrbillinoc, thanks for that suggestion, I would have never actually thought of that.  I just got back from testing out a few strong 3 woods (RBZ tour spoon, MP 650 13.5*, and the Nike VR pro 13*).  I think that is the route to go for me.  I have been gaming a old taylormade titanium bubble shaft and it is basically the same size head as the strong 3s.  Something about the smaller head sizes that suites my eye at address.

I was really shocked with the MP-650 to be honest.  The ball came off the face like a bullet.  I didnt expect a mizuno wood to be that great (I wasn't really aware Mizuno made them to be honest).  According the indoor launch monitor, I was getting a bit more distance and a better ball flight with the all 3 woods.  I think I might pair it was a 5w and give it a go.

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I recently replaced my RBZ 3 wood with the Ping i20 15* 3 wood. It has a solid feel and a classic shape. It's a smaller head and pretty workable. And the all black on the club looks pretty sick with the white lines on the face!!

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I've been working to figure out my actual 3wd distance and have been lazering 3wd vs Driver lately to figure out my layup distances.

I hit either an Adams 9.5* 9015D, or Ping i15 8* which plays like a 9.5*

My 3wood is a Tour Edge Exotics  15* CB1

Early in the year I was testing 3woods,and it's consistently 20yds behind my driver.  Now, that said, the carry is closer then that so on uphill landing areas or soft courses, the gap closes up as driver gains from increased rollout...and consequently the driver gains a bit more on downhill landing areas.

I don't see any reason to have the clubs closer then 20yds together, the 3wd is needed for layups, so I'd keep 6* or so difference between these clubs.

I do have a 13 degree RBZ Tour that is a bit longer then the CB1 as expected, but tougher to hit off the turf for me.  I put it in the bag on tight courses, more for use off the tee.

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