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MrSteven37

Shaft questions

13 posts in this topic

Hey everyone, I'm new here!

I'm 25 from Ontario and have never owned good golf clubs in my life, I shoot anywhere from low 80's to low 90's, and I just got a crazy deal on some Taylor Made clubs from a friend.

R11 Driver

R11 3 Wood

R11? 18.5 Degree fairway wood, White head like the others, not sure if it's R11 though!

3-7 Taylor Made MC Irons

8-PW Taylor Made MB Irons

52, 56, 60, Callaway X-Series Wedges

He sold it all to me for $600 so I could absolutely not pass the deal up, he even threw in an R11 bag.

My problem is that the Woods are all X-Stiff Tour Preferred shafts, and they're pretty much unhittable, the Irons are also normal stiff but I've found them to be rather rewarding to get used to. The woods however, remain completely unhittable because of the shafts.

I'm not sure how to go about getting them changed, I talked to a guy at Golf town and he said it could be upwards of 100-140 per shaft with labour but I don't really want to buy new shafts, I just need the flex changed. Should I go directly to Taylor Made and see if they can switch them for less price or what?

Any help would be greatly appreciated guys, thanks!

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I don't believe Taylormade will change it out for you.

You also can't change the flex without changing the entire shaft.

The closest shop near me charges $75 for labor.  The shafts themselves vary in price.  You can probably find a decent shaft for $20-30.  Usually you also need to buy a new grip to put on the new shaft, which will usually run you $5-10 because many places won't put the old one back on or can't save it when trying to remove it.  So basically, yeah, it's going to cost you around a $100 to change it out.

You can always try to find another shop and see if someone will do it for you for less.

The only other option is (if you're fairly handy and mechanically inclined) watch a bunch of videos on youtube or something and see how you might change it yourself.

Sorry...I know it's not the answer you want to hear.

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Theres really nothing you can do without spending a lot of money..

but in all seriousness that is an unbelievable steal if those clubs are even in decent shape. There's no way you should be complaining about having those shafts changed out for getting like $1800 worth of clubs AND a bag for $600!!!!

Thats almost as good as winning a freakin contest

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"I don't really want to buy new shafts, I just need the flex changed"

You can't loosen the flex unless you add head weight (a lot)  That leaves replacing the shafts YOU CAN DO IT YOURSELF it is not that hard. You need a heat gun, ordinary hardware store epoxy and some basic tools.

I get shafts a lot cheaper by buying the entire club from a used sporting goods store. For example I can get UST shafts on old Callaway Big Bertha heads around here for less than 10 dollars. I just recycle the shaft.

---------------------------------------------------

People often like to change the shaft in their golf club , whether it's because the current one broke or because they want to try out the newest one on the market without purchasing a new club. To help save money, this is a task anyone can do with the right tools.

Step 1

Secure the shaft in the vise. Tape the head of the golf club to prevent it from being scratched.

Step 2

Use the utility knife to cut off the ferrule, which is the small plastic piece by the hosel. A little heat may be necessary if the ferrule is difficult to take off. If so, put the butane torch near it.

Items you will need

  • Vise or clamp
  • Propane or butane micro torch
  • Hosel brush
  • Heat-proof gloves
  • Masking tape
  • Small drill bit
  • Epoxy
  • Acetone

Step 3

Apply heat to the hosel area with the propane or butane torch.

Step 4

Apply some pressure to the head while heating and continue doing so until the epoxy bond is softened. The head of the club should then come off easily. Once the head comes off, clean out the hosel area with the small drill bit, then pour a little acetone in the area to thoroughly clean it.

Step 5

See if the shaft tip needs to be trimmed, according to the manufacturer. If so, follow the instructions for this. Apply epoxy all around the inside of the hosel. Then, apply epoxy all around the bottom of the shaft, as well. Gently, push the shaft into the hosel and twist it a bit to make sure the shaft is all the way down in the hosel. Use acetone to clean off any excess epoxy on the shaft or hosel. Wait roughly 12 hours.

Step 6

Once the epoxy is dry, cut the shaft to the desired length and apply the grip . Wait another 12 to 16 hours, and the club should be ready for use.

Warnings

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you didn't have to explain the entire process but you can try soft stepping with the woods and I'm not sure thats even possible with those but its worth asking..

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Thanks for the replies guys, the clubs are in beautiful condition too. I honestly think the guy who sold them to me (a friend of my brother's who I really don't know well at all) probably couldn't hit them and thought that for $600 he was ripping me off! Hehe anyways, I guess I'll just fork out and get them properly done at Golf Town. Thanks guys.

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Whoa guys, he said R11 woods, the only thing you need to change a shaft on an R11 is a torx tip screwdriver.  There are a lot of R11 and R9 shafts with tips already on them for cheap on ebay.  My local golf shop has three R11 shafts from demo clubs on their used club rack for $40 a piece.  An R9 shaft tip will fit right into a R11 head no problem.

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i recently learned about hard stepping and soft stepping and its a brilliant idea. i just wasn't sure if you could do it with woods

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You can't add shaft material (that is required for soft stepping)  if it has already been cut off.   It is not possible to soft step the same shaft already in a club.  You can hard step it but the OP says it is way too stiff already.

http://thegolfcoastonline.com/page.asp?id=29

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Ebay is your friend. Buy new or used shafts with adapters already installed or you can buy shafts and adapters seperate and install the adapters yourself. You can also pull the adapters and re-use them, but plastic ferrules will have to be lost. The old R9 adapters are the easiest because the plastic ferrule has nothing to do with telling what setting you're on. OP, if your 5w is white and doesn't have an adjustable hosel, it's a Superfast 2.0. Jon, I know all about hard stepping and soft stepping, but for some reason I don't understand your post. You can put a 3i shaft into a 4i, 4i shaft into a 5i shaft etc. and butt trim to length. No adding material required. That is soft stepped 1x. Forgive me if I'm missing something here.
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Luciuswooding  "You can soft step with irons but with woods it's not really possible. You could use the shaft in a 3 wood, or add some head weight to make it play closer to what you need, but driver shafts are usually a bit too light to work well in woods. It also may not make a big difference if the shaft is much too stiff."

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE SHAFTS ARE THE SAME SHAFT  there is no "a bit too light to work in woods"  The key is understanding how much was already cut off the factory shaft. You need to know nothing else.

To HARD step woods PER FOLLOWING CHART Take a shaft pulled from an L flex 7 wood  and reinstall to be a Driver A flex. To SOFT reverse this, Take an A Driver and make it about  L 7W.

The key is understanding how much was already cut off the factory shaft. You need to know nothing else.

Then you add  shaft extenders if needed in the butts to get the desired final length.  likewise for irons. You can swap shafts this way in an entire set to change flex. You then only have to buy a shaft or two to complete the change in flex.

A tip to the wise. Buying sets of clubs with desired shafts is often cheaper than buying extenders. There are plenty of no name so to speak clubs out there for sale that may have very acceptable shafts.  You may even get some very nice grips to recycle all for the same price as extenders

FOR WOODS

Apollo Graphite Golf Shafts

Tip trimming for APOLLO BALISTIK L/A/R/S COMBINATION GRAPHITE WOOD shafts


TIP TRIMMING (then butt trim to final length)

Wood Shaft # 1 # 3 # 5 # 7
L flex
0”
0.5” 1” 1.5”
A flex
2”
2.5” 3” 3.5”
R flex
5"
5.5” 6” 6.5”
S flex
8”
8.5” 9” 9.5”

Tip trimming for APOLLO BALISTIK L/A/R/S COMBINATION GRAPHITE IRON shafts


TIP TRIMMING (then butt trim to final length)

Iron Shaft #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 & WEDGES
L flex
0”
0” 0” 0.25” 0.5” 0.75” 1” 1.25” 1.5”
A flex
1.5”
1.75” 2” 2.25” 2.5” 2.75” 3” 3.25” 3.5”
R flex
4.5”
4.75” 5” 5.25” 5.5” 5.75” 6” 6.25” 6.5”
S flex
7.5”
7.75” 8” 8.25” 8.5” 8.75” 9” 9.25”

9.5”

http://www.golf-components.com/tip-trimming-instructions.html

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Originally Posted by Jon Robert

Luciuswooding  "You can soft step with irons but with woods it's not really possible. You could use the shaft in a 3 wood, or add some head weight to make it play closer to what you need, but driver shafts are usually a bit too light to work well in woods. It also may not make a big difference if the shaft is much too stiff."

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE SHAFTS ARE THE SAME SHAFT  there is no "a bit too light to work in woods"  The key is understanding how much was already cut off the factory shaft. You need to know nothing else.

To HARD step woods PER FOLLOWING CHART Take a shaft pulled from an L flex 7 wood  and reinstall to be a Driver A flex. To SOFT reverse this, Take an A Driver and make it about  L 7W.

The key is understanding how much was already cut off the factory shaft. You need to know nothing else.

Then you add  shaft extenders if needed in the butts to get the desired final length.  likewise for irons.  You can swap shafts this way in an entire set to change flex. You then only have to buy a shaft or two to complete the change in flex.

A tip to the wise. Buying sets of clubs with desired shafts is often cheaper than buying extenders. There are plenty of no name so to speak clubs out there for sale that may have very acceptable shafts.  You may even get some very nice grips to recycle all for the same price as extenders

FOR WOODS

Apollo Graphite Golf Shafts

Tip trimming for APOLLO BALISTIK L/A/R/S COMBINATION GRAPHITE WOOD shafts

TIP TRIMMING (then butt trim to final length)

Wood Shaft

#1

#3

#5

#7

L flex

0”

0.5”

1”

1.5”

A flex

2”

2.5”

3”

3.5”

R flex

5"

5.5”

6”

6.5”

S flex

8”

8.5”

9”

9.5”

Tip trimming for APOLLO BALISTIK L/A/R/S COMBINATION GRAPHITE IRON shafts

TIP TRIMMING (then butt trim to final length)

Iron Shaft

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

#6

#7

#8

#9 & WEDGES

L flex

0”

0”

0”

0.25”

0.5”

0.75”

1”

1.25”

1.5”

A flex

1.5”

1.75”

2”

2.25”

2.5”

2.75”

3”

3.25”

3.5”

R flex

4.5”

4.75”

5”

5.25”

5.5”

5.75”

6”

6.25”

6.5”

S flex

7.5”

7.75”

8”

8.25”

8.5”

8.75”

9”

9.25”

9.5”

http://www.golf-components.com/tip-trimming-instructions.html

Those instructions are OK for some shafts, but others do have different tipping instructions. Many shafts DO in fact come in multiple models for use in driver and woods, or have entire models designed just for one or the other, and many players find that the lightweight driver shafts so prominent today don't work as well as a heavier model in their woods. Many players may put a 65g shaft in their driver, but something in the 80g range in their woods, it's very common. You are correct that many companies prefer to release one model for all woods, but it is not always the case and some shafts react differently to tipping. There are many dedicated fairway wood shafts like the Grafalloy Epic, which often have raw lengths of 44" or less, making them unsuitable for a standard driver. Some have parallel tips of around 4", but others have less. Aldila, for example, has 5 different sets of tipping instructions for their own product line alone, not counting iron shafts.

OP: I suggest you avoid Apollo shafts in particular. You can get serviceable wood shafts in the 30$ range that are a lot better than anything Apollo puts out.

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