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Jhwarren

What Did You Learn From Last Week's Winner on the PGA Tour?

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I feel like it can be a constructive exercise to take a look back on last week's PGA Tour event and see if there is anything that we can learn from the winner (or others) to improve our games.

These answers could be technique (full swing, short game or putting) related, course management strategies or general observations about something that you feel the winner did that contributed to his victory.

I would love to hear your thoughts.

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From watching Russell Henley's round last night, I was struck by how quickly he plays his shots once he made up his mind. It reminded of Brandt Snedeker. I think one thing that we could transfer into our own game would be to maintain your normal pace throughout the entire round, especially when the pressure is on. If you like to play quickly, continue to play quickly. If you are more methodical, then take your time. I know we the pressure gets on me, I have a tendency to slow way down. While this could be a good thing sometimes, it is not my normal game. I would be better off making up my mind and playing the shot.

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Originally Posted by Jhwarren

From watching Russell Henley's round last night, I was struck by how quickly he plays his shots once he made up his mind. It reminded of Brandt Snedeker. I think one thing that we could transfer into our own game would be to maintain your normal pace throughout the entire round, especially when the pressure is on. If you like to play quickly, continue to play quickly. If you are more methodical, then take your time. I know we the pressure gets on me, I have a tendency to slow way down. While this could be a good thing sometimes, it is not my normal game. I would be better off making up my mind and playing the shot.


I like playing fast. I know my skill set is way down there, but I feel that if you can execute quickly and correctly everytime; things start to feel natural.

Interesting viewpoint. I do not like to waste folks time, since time is money. ;)

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http://www.pga.com/golf-instruction/lesson-learned/putting/lesson-learned-russell-henleys-putting-routine-can-help

Here's an article discussing Henley's routine.

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Good idea for a thread.

Here's my quick contribution: You don't need to maintain a straight, rigid lead arm at the top of the backswing.

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Originally Posted by Jhwarren

From watching Russell Henley's round last night, I was struck by how quickly he plays his shots once he made up his mind. It reminded of Brandt Snedeker. I think one thing that we could transfer into our own game would be to maintain your normal pace throughout the entire round, especially when the pressure is on. If you like to play quickly, continue to play quickly. If you are more methodical, then take your time. I know we the pressure gets on me, I have a tendency to slow way down. While this could be a good thing sometimes, it is not my normal game. I would be better off making up my mind and playing the shot.


Something else to consider: Committing to the shot once the situation is assessed and the analysis is complete.

My problem is that I have the shot in my head, but fail to execute it due to poor mechanics (which I am working on). This game is so darn analytical, that is what makes it so much fun (in my morbid sense of what fun is). I am so darn eager (hence the faster pace of play approach) to hit that shot I have in my head, that oftentimes I really think I rush things and ruin a perfect opportunity on the course.

Snedeker's approach and play is one I really, really have taken after. Especially my putting, which is really pretty good if I must say so.

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Originally Posted by tstrike34

Something else to consider: Committing to the shot once the situation is assessed and the analysis is complete.

My problem is that I have the shot in my head, but fail to execute it due to poor mechanics (which I am working on). This game is so darn analytical, that is what makes it so much fun (in my morbid sense of what fun is). I am so darn eager (hence the faster pace of play approach) to hit that shot I have in my head, that oftentimes I really think I rush things and ruin a perfect opportunity on the course.

Snedeker's approach and play is one I really, really have taken after. Especially my putting, which is really pretty good if I must say so.

Good point Tstrike. So your tendency seems to be to rush from time to time. A good idea for you may be to slow down. For Henley, however, he seems to play fast. Had he all of a sudden started grinding like Ben Crane, his whole momentum could have been thrown off. I think it just shows the importance of knowing your own pace.

Originally Posted by iacas

Good idea for a thread.

Here's my quick contribution: You don't need to maintain a straight, rigid lead arm at the top of the backswing.

Here's a quick video that illustrates Iacas' point.

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Originally Posted by Jhwarren

Good point Tstrike. So your tendency seems to be to rush from time to time. A good idea for you may be to slow down. For Henley, however, he seems to play fast. Had he all of a sudden started grinding like Ben Crane, his whole momentum could have been thrown off. I think it just shows the importance of knowing your own pace.

See that's just my problem. I know the shot I want to execute. I have it scoped, doped, and pegged. Then I am ready to fire.

I get to address, and then I start going through all the mental checklist of the execution. It gets so frustrating so I go back to my days in the military on the firing range: Acquire, aim, and fire when your breath is out. Hence the quickness (y'all seen the videos of my swing in its earlier stages).

However, I am so conscious of others on the course that I do not want to be the guy that slows everyone down (guess what, I do it hunting for duck balls).

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Originally Posted by Jhwarren

From watching Russell Henley's round last night, I was struck by how quickly he plays his shots once he made up his mind. It reminded of Brandt Snedeker. I think one thing that we could transfer into our own game would be to maintain your normal pace throughout the entire round, especially when the pressure is on. If you like to play quickly, continue to play quickly. If you are more methodical, then take your time. I know we the pressure gets on me, I have a tendency to slow way down. While this could be a good thing sometimes, it is not my normal game. I would be better off making up my mind and playing the shot.

Echoing what several others have said, it's so critical to have a routine that you can go to when the pressure is amped up, whether you're playing for the club championship or just standing over a putt on the 18th to win or lose a $2 bet. Having that routine that you do every time gives you the best chance, even if you do feel like you're bleeding internally standing over than 5-footer.

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I learned that over consumption of pepperoni can cause one to go from the winners circle to with drawl.  Its a very fine line that a man must walk.

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Not so much I learned but I'll say I was reminded, again, how damn good these guys are....  and also was reminded how important ball striking is.

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Originally Posted by Beachcomber

I learned that over consumption of pepperoni can cause one to go from the winners circle to with drawl.  Its a very fine line that a man must walk.

Now, now.  You know he had the fever.. uh, I mean  flu.

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Aside from his pace of play was his swing tempo (speed), very fast.

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Originally Posted by iacas

Good idea for a thread.

Here's my quick contribution: You don't need to maintain a straight, rigid lead arm at the top of the backswing.

Or through impact, according to last week's Euro Tour winner!

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Originally Posted by Stretch

Or through impact, according to last week's Euro Tour winner!

Great pictures!

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WOW ... Nice pictures... I did notice how straight his left wrist is... It never breaks at all (well maybe just a smidge at the top of his backswing).

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A really exciting tournament. Congrats to Brian Gay. What a great final round!

Here are a couple of his swings:

What did you guys think?

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Well worth a watch. Glad James has started doing these and hope he carries on through the season. He gives a shout out to the Sand Trap and I wonder if he got the idea from this very thread?

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