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forepoints

What do you think about golf shoes with permanent cleats?

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On my last visit to Lumpy's in Palm Springs, I noticed that the whole shelf of shoes were the type with permanent cleats. There were maybe 2 or 3 shoes that had the removable spikes but no one seems interested in buying those anymore.

I'm in the market for new shoes and was wondering what you all think? Do you think spikes are on the way out?

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I think that when replaceable spikes wear down, you replace them. When permanent spikes wear down, you buy new shoes.

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Originally Posted by caniac6

I think that when replaceable spikes wear down, you replace them. When permanent spikes wear down, you buy new shoes.

^^^^^This^^^^^

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I bought some true tours at the end of last season so this year will be their first first full season of golf. Can't say for sure but I suspect that by the time the studs wear down you would probably be ready for new shoes anyway. The studs are pretty meaty compared to screw in spikes.
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I"ll put it this way.  My FJ Contours are about 5 years old, have had 4 sets of new spikes, but the shoes themselves are still going strong.  A friend who buys the spikeless (not sure what brand) goes through a new pair just about once a year.   $14 for a set of spikes or $100 plus for new shoes.  That's a no brainer for me.

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The spikes on my pair of True's from last season wore down while the rest of the shoe was in near new condition.  If you're looking at it from a strictly cost perspective, shoes with replacement spikes will last longer and give you more value for the money.

Money aside, the True shoes and Ecco's with permanent spikes are much more comfortable than the shoes I own with replacement spikes.  I wear my True and Ecco's to the stores and then hit the range without having to change shoes, I'd never do that with my traditional golf shoes with replacement cleats.

Golf wise, I prefer True's and Ecco's for the range and on courses that aren't too hilly or when the course is not muddy.  On hilly or muddy courses I prefer the replacement cleat shoes as I feel they give me more grip and support.

Hope this helps.

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The reason I'm looking at a shoe with permanent cleats is because I can't remove the removable cleats. I paid over $150 for this pair of shoes and can't get half of the cleats off.

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That's my thinking too. I tried on a pair of Ecco with permanent cleats and they are comfortable.

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Originally Posted by forepoints

The reason I'm looking at a shoe with permanent cleats is because I can't remove the removable cleats. I paid over $150 for this pair of shoes and can't get half of the cleats off.

They will all come off, might have some mud inside.  Some of the cleat tools are better than others, the ones that come with cleats are cheap and don't always work well.  I bought one from Golfsmith that was about $15 and I've never had a problem getting cleats off since.

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I [quote name="forepoints" url="/t/65706/what-do-you-think-about-golf-shoes-with-permanent-cleats#post_823772"]The reason I'm looking at a shoe with permanent cleats is because I can't remove the removable cleats. I paid over $150 for this pair of shoes and can't get half of the cleats off. [/quote] I use a pair of pliers. Just grab and twist.
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I have replaced one or two spikes during my years playing golf, both of which fell off long before they were worn down. The last 2-3 pair of shoes, I have gotten ones without spikes. After a few seasons with these shoes, I have no issues. I slipped once on a really steep slope on a really wet day. I could have slipped with any kind of shoe in that position. They are more comfortable to wear, which is the most important for me. You should try out any shoe first, but I don´t see a reason to avoid shoes without spikes.
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Originally Posted by newtogolf

The spikes on my pair of True's from last season wore down while the rest of the shoe was in near new condition.  If you're looking at it from a strictly cost perspective, shoes with replacement spikes will last longer and give you more value for the money.

Money aside, the True shoes and Ecco's with permanent spikes are much more comfortable than the shoes I own with replacement spikes.  I wear my True and Ecco's to the stores and then hit the range without having to change shoes, I'd never do that with my traditional golf shoes with replacement cleats.

You wear your golf shoes everywhere (I do too) - if you wear a pair of TRUE shoes on the golf course primarily they will last a long, long time.

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I once played with somebody who played college level golf and was a scratch player.  I walked up and noticed he was in regular cross trainer type gym shoes.  When asked, he said his theory was that if he slipped while wearing those, he was swinging to hard.

I have to say it is fairly sound advice with one exception.  Most golf shoes tend to be water proof, so I find that when I play early morning rounds with gym shoes my feet are puddles walking through the dew covered grass.

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You wear your golf shoes everywhere (I do too) - if you wear a pair of TRUE shoes on the golf course primarily they will last a long, long time.

That's what I was thinking.

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Originally Posted by iacas

You wear your golf shoes everywhere (I do too) - if you wear a pair of TRUE shoes on the golf course primarily they will last a long, long time.

You're 100% right, the problem is the TRUE shoes are so comfortable, I don't want to just wear them on the golf course.

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I think that when replaceable spikes wear down, you replace them. When permanent spikes wear down, you buy new shoes.

You can buy replacement cleats for $US15.00; replacement shoes average between $US40 to 150. Can't argue with the math :D

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I once played with somebody who played college level golf and was a scratch player.  I walked up and noticed he was in regular cross trainer type gym shoes.  When asked, he said his theory was that if he slipped while wearing those, he was swinging to hard.  ...

I wear athletic shoes if I'm practicing my putting or short game, or hitting shots off a tacky "grass" mat in a golf shop.

Otherwise, I wear spikes. We have a lot of hilly lies in the St. Louis area. It's easy to slip without traction, especially if the grass is wet.

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The reason I'm looking at a shoe with permanent cleats is because I can't remove the removable cleats. I paid over $150 for this pair of shoes and can't get half of the cleats off.


Dirt has collected in the threads under the spike, try to take a spray bottle of water and spray around the base of the spike, take a sharp object and try and clean out the dirt between the bottom of the shoe and the spike, get a good spike removal tool like someone else said, worse cases you may need to use vise grips to get a good grip on the spike, lastly use a pin punch and try and spin the spike out, if all this fails use dynamite.

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