• Announcements

    • iacas

      Create a Signature!   02/05/2016

      Everyone, go here and edit your signature this week: http://thesandtrap.com/settings/signature/.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
cdywy

Working at a Private Club - Tips Please?

14 posts in this topic

Hi very new to this website so I could post this so if it is in the wrong spot I'm sorry. I just got a job today as a locker room staff now it's me and 1 other person we get along well so it's not bad. My duties are like clean everything, fill water on certain tees, laundry, greet members, polish shoes. I only have part time hours and its only a summer position. I really wanna advance and make this a career one day. Any tips! Thanks! (Typed on my iPhone sorry for spelling)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Want to get rid of this advertisement? Sign up (or log in) today! It's free!

It sounds like an upscale club.  I play public courses so take this with a grain of salt but I would try to remember the names of the members. You can greet them by their last names until you are told differently by them.  Do your best to remember how they like things done.  Also like any job even if you are having a bad day try to look like you wouldn't want to be anywhere else and of course show up on time and do your best to not show up people that have worked there longer, especially your immediate boss.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't call the members "buddy" "pal". I'd call them Mister, Misses, etc., even if they're younger. Ask them how they played today. Did they get any birdies. Show genuine interest. Don't be obsequious, though.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by Rick Martin

Don't call the members "buddy" "pal". I'd call them Mister, Misses, etc., even if they're younger. Ask them how they played today. Did they get any birdies. Show genuine interest. Don't be obsequious, though.

Good suggestion here. I would add don't call them by their first name unless they tell you to. So Mr. Soandso, and they may tell you, you can call them John.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards and Achievements

Be polite, great everyone with Mr. or Mrs., pay attention to when members are speaking to you and always ask how their round went today. I can't speak for every country club but where I am member if the members like you it will almost carry as much weight as your boss liking you.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All good recommendations.....especially Mr/Mrs, and work HARD to remember their names, or at least to give them the impression that you do.

Try to anticipate .  If you know that Mr. Smith likes something, have it for him  before he has to ask for it.  Also, don't forget the kids.  Sometimes that's hard to remember, but treat the kids, as you would the members.

Great experience that will serve you well in any sales/customer service type job/career you might pursue in the future.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards and Achievements

All good pointers - Mr/Mrs. and remember names especially.  Also, pay attention to details - it is the little things that separate good service from great service.  If members are paying/tipping you to clean and polish shoes do a good job (a pet peeve of mine since one club I belonged to the guy did a terrible job).  Be discreet - if you overhear something in the locker room never, ever, ever pass it along (ever!).  Take criticism to heart (unless its the ubiquitous whiny/b*tchy guy who's always griping) - it is usually well intentioned. And, when on your breaks, find a nice out of the way place to take them. Not a good impression when a member comes up to the locker room entrance and sees the attendant (or waiters/waitresses) outside smoking and/or on their phones (that goes for restaurants and retail stores as well!).

Good luck to you and you are off to a good start by asking for input on this!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Along with all of the above good replies, I would suggest speaking with the Head Pro at the Club.

Indicate to him you are interested in learning the golf business operations and request to preform other duties to learn.

Make it a habit to be thorough and act as a professional, take pride in what you are doing.

Also, keep busy at all times, even if it's just general tasks. Be attentive to members, but try not to be overwhelming.

Smile, Smile, Smile, all the time.......

Believe me, members will talk mostly about two types of club employees. The "good and the bad"

Club Rat

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards and Achievements

I worked as a caddy for a few years at a high end club in Chicago.

The tips that I remember as a caddy (that I have carried into my professional career) is to show respect.

Talk to people by looking them in the eye, always greet with a firm and confident handshake, always smile.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by David in FL

All good recommendations.....especially Mr/Mrs, and work HARD to remember their names, or at least to give them the impression that you do.

Try to anticipate.  If you know that Mr. Smith likes something, have it for him  before he has to ask for it.  Also, don't forget the kids.  Sometimes that's hard to remember, but treat the kids, as you would the members.

Great experience that will serve you well in any sales/customer service type job/career you might pursue in the future.

This is huge. Many clubs are full of retirees and if they bring their grand kids out and you treat them like royalty the members will be beaming because they will be the awesome grandma or grandpa who has the coolest club. Of course it doesn't have to be grand kids. Everyone loves it when you make kids feel special. Even members who don't have their kids there but see you interacting with other kids and taking care of the little ones will remember it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you see trash around the clubhouse and parking lot (outside), pick it up.  The course I play have all kinds of staff members who walk around, but ignore that kind of stuff. Guess they feel that if they didn't put it there, they shouldn't pick it up. Show pride in your organization/club and try to make it the best around - a place people want to come back to. Straighten up the joint, if and when you can.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by clearwaterms

Talk to people by looking them in the eye, always greet with a firm and confident handshake, always smile.

This is HUGE in all service positions.  I don't care if it's a top scale store, or fast food.

We have a very anonymous society and I'm finding that young employees simply avoid eye contact until they are done with the current task (stocking shelves, helping another customer, etc etc etc).  It FEELS to the customer that the employee thinks you are less important.

They ALL need to be taught to greet any new customer simply -

1 - Smile

2 - Eye contact

3 - Acknowledge they are there:

-- "Hi, I see you just came in, I'm working with Mr. Smith, here, and I'm happy to help to you as soon as we are done."

-- "Hello, sir, welcome to _____, I'm just finishing up stacking these Foot Joys, and I'd glad to help you in a moment"

-- "Hi, how are you?  Just need to load this cash register tape and I help you right away"

It let's the customer know they are important, and you are happy to see them.  And then they are usually happy to wait for you.  In fact, if you can drop the current job (scenarios 2 and 3 up there) do so also and help them right off......

If you avoid eye contact and act like you don't see them, then they get pissed and impatient.

In the first example, It actually will make Mr. Smith more comfortable too, so he doesn't feel like he's inconveniencing the other customer by taking your time.

I saw this again a week ago at a shop.  The clerk was helping one customer and then 4 people came in (I was the first in line of the 4) and she acted like they weren't even there.  The first customer offered to stand aside and let her get those 4 processed.  The clerk actually just looked at her said, "no, it's ok, they can wait" and then nervous grinned at me and glanced briefly at the next person.  The first customer got very uncomfortable and rushed her purchase.  The three customers behind started mumbling at each other.  The clerk was totally oblivious to how she instantly made all 5 of her customers unsatisfied.....  (all she had to do was smile, eye contact, and acknowledge)

it's really simple stuff.  I'm nowhere near an old timer, but even when I was a kid, this stuff was instinctively known to us in our jobs.  I don't know what's happened.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards and Achievements

Originally Posted by Rick Martin

If you see trash around the clubhouse and parking lot (outside), pick it up.  The course I play have all kinds of staff members who walk around, but ignore that kind of stuff. Guess they feel that if they didn't put it there, they shouldn't pick it up. Show pride in your organization/club and try to make it the best around - a place people want to come back to. Straighten up the joint, if and when you can.


members too, darn it

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards and Achievements

if you are in the locker room / mens room remember what they drink, how they like things laid out, be responsive but don't try to be a "buddy"... always call them Mr x the fact of the matter is almost all clubs require staff to call members that. i have told several staff memebers over the years to stop but they don't listen! occasionally if no one else is around they will use my first name but it is not often. being nice to the kids or grandkids is HUGE but again keep the professional distance.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • 2016 TST Partners

    GAME Golf
    PING Golf
    Golf Evolution
  • Posts

    • Finding Value in The Used Club Market
      I'm liking this:   That makes a lot of sense.  Local Retailers may be getting some of the last years models dumped on them when the new clubs start cycling through.  I was thinking about doing the demo days thing to get a taste of what is out there.  The R7 limited and R11 Taylormade Drivers were good to me.  I think a X2 hot/Big Bertha/etc/ect would probably be more forgiving.  Still, I look at the clubs of old... the Cleveland Launcher Comp / Callaway Hawkeye and think: "If I can buy that club for $20... and I can buy newer (used) for $50-$100... hmmm.  Spinning the wheels.  Thanks for the advice though I really appreciate it. If anyone has a Driver / had a Driver they loved from (2009-2014) let me know about it!  What did you like/didn't like?
    • My ex-home courses closing, changing - proofs that golf is in decline
      I just found out that my ex-home course, Sunol Valley Golf course, went out of business last month.  I played 2 - 3 times a week for 2 years not too long ago.  The course was done in by shrinking golfers, and 500% increase in water cost in the last 4 years of CA drought.  They could not make money.   Another ex-home course is now doing business as a golf and foot golf (soccer golf) course.  Golfing customers were not enough. Another course nearby (Santa Clara Tennis and Golf Club) is going to turn into a parking lot for a recently built football stadium. It is sad that despite improved economy in Bay Area, CA, golf business is in decline.  They have been in decline since 1990s but most of the courses around here survived 2008-9 recession.  The current drought and the resulting water cost going through the roof appears to be the final nail in the coffin for the weaker courses.   Sad.
    • Injury Question
      I didn't play golf for about 11 weeks due to it being difficult to play with work after day light savings time fell back.  Now, from the sounds of it, I played through the majority of the repair time as I walked 9 holes 4-5 times a week with 1 day of walking 18 for 7-9 weeks after the injury....I know, I'm an idiot. As it stands now I don't really notice it 90% of the time, its just something that pops up on a swing every now and then.  From the sounds of your healing time, I may have caused it to heal improperly leaving me with a hitch....  If I really just need to not do anything and it'll heal over time then I'd gladly do it, kicking and screaming the entire way as I already had a plan in place to push my handicap into the single digits by years end. I don't like the sound of having something happen as "I get older," I'm only 26 damn it .
    • Injury Question
      I had this injury last spring/summer. You have pulled your intercostal muscles in your ribs. It is a nasty injury which requires a lot of downtime (4-6 weeks minimum more like 8 weeks) to let them repair. It happens as we get older. You need to research ways to heal and take time off from doing those motions such as winding up and releasing. It took 4 months to completely heal and that included lots of ibuprofen as an anti inflammatory and stretching. Take the time off to stop the inflamation or it won't go away and could take longer to heal. It is a difficult process that takes time and when you first feel like you are okay you are more than likely to re injure and make it as bad or worse. You just have to take your medicine or that painful stitch won't go away.  
    • My Swing (WUTiger)
      Couple good videos/drills for you to check out @WUTiger.  
  • TST Blog Entries

  • Images

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. onthehunt526
      onthehunt526
      (29 years old)
  • Blog Entries