• Announcements

    • iacas

      Create a Signature!   02/05/2016

      Everyone, go here and edit your signature this week: http://thesandtrap.com/settings/signature/.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Second Chance

A lot of shaft length threads, but...

11 posts in this topic

Has anyone actually cut their driver/3W shafts down? If so, what length did you go with and why? Where there any issues you encountered doing it...?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Want to get rid of this advertisement? Sign up (or log in) today! It's free!

Driver to 45 inches from 45.5 ... clubmaker did it. He put a little hotmelt in the head and installed different weights to get the R1 to D3.

Fairway woods - if you cut, you affect club balance. You can offset the shorter club with a heavier shaft; you can keep the OEM shaft and have install a heavier weight in the head (if applicable), if NA, clubmaker can hot melt, or you can place some lead tape on the club head or even on the hosel... if you do hot melt, too much is a bad thing ... makes head too heavy and takes out any feeling of liveliness in the clubhead -- use sparingly.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards and Achievements

Thanks!

Yeah, I want to go to a 44"-44.5 driver. I've been experimenting with choking up a half inch and see no loss of distance, but tons of feel and a lot more accuracy. It's an obvious improvement, but I'm worried that cutting the shaft won't be the fix. I think I'm just going to continue anthony kimming it... :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recommend that you put some impact tape on the clubface, and hit some balls.  If the impact tape shows that you are consistantly hitting in the center of the clubface then I would not shorten the club.  If you are hitting consistently on the toe or heel then you could try just adjusting your setup.  For example if you setup with the ball in the center and you consistently have a toe impact, you could setup with the ball positioned more on the heel.  If you setup with the ball in the center and you consistently have a heel impact then you could change your setup by positioning the ball at the toe.  If your impacts are all over the place, then you could consider shortening the club so you have better control and get a more consistent impact.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by Second Chance

Has anyone actually cut their driver/3W shafts down? If so, what length did you go with and why? Where there any issues you encountered doing it...?

I had my Ping G15 cut down to 45" from 45.75. I am making much better contact in the center of the club face, which leads to more fairways hit. I don't feel I lost any distance, but picked up accuracy. Shortening the shaft did affect the swing weight, so I got some lead tape and headed to the range. I would hit about 10-15 balls, add a strip of lead tape to the the bottom of the club and hit another 10-15 balls. I repeated this until I got the ball flight I was looking for. I have no idea what the swing weight of my driver is, all I know is that I'm happy with it.

I will never play with a driver length longer than 45" again, and am considering taking another 1/4"-1/2" off.  Good luck.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What kind of tape did you use and where did you get it?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by rick0502

What kind of tape did you use and where did you get it?

Assuming you are asking about impact tape, you can get it at most golf stores.  It comes in 2 shapes, one for driver club face, and one for the iron clubface.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was wondering about lead tape
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by BBailey

I had my Ping G15 cut down to 45" from 45.75. I am making much better contact in the center of the club face, which leads to more fairways hit. I don't feel I lost any distance, but picked up accuracy. Shortening the shaft did affect the swing weight, so I got some lead tape and headed to the range. I would hit about 10-15 balls, add a strip of lead tape to the the bottom of the club and hit another 10-15 balls. I repeated this until I got the ball flight I was looking for. I have no idea what the swing weight of my driver is, all I know is that I'm happy with it.

I will never play with a driver length longer than 45" again, and am considering taking another 1/4"-1/2" off.  Good luck.

Thanks man!

I have the diamana x60 shaft XXXX/5000...which retails for "WAY TOO MUCH"... and I would hate to cut it, screw up the swing weight and have to deal with the aftermath of wasted money. I'm in communication with my club fitter, but he seems to think I'm crazy. Funny how sensitive clubmaker's are...regardless of the overwhelming data to support this argument.

Either way, once I get the right amount of choke up-- I'll probably go the same route you did. My current project is bending my irons flatter and flatter...I'm going to get rid of the left side of the golf course if it kills me! :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OOOO, you can get lead tape at a golf store too.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by rick0502

What kind of tape did you use and where did you get it?

You can pick up lead tape at any golf store. I got mine at Dicks Sporting Goods, less than $5. It's self adhesive and you just cut it the length you want and apply it. You can add or remove it as needed without much hassle. Hope that answered your question.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • 2016 TST Partners

    GAME Golf
    PING Golf
    Golf Evolution
  • Posts

    • TST Member Review - The Tee Claw
      Product Name: The Tee Claw
      Product Type: Tee Holder for Golf Mats
      Product Website/URL: www.teeclaw.com
      Cost: $15 Ratings (out of 5):
      Quality: 4
      Value: 4
      Effectiveness: 4
      Durability: tbd
      Esthetic Appeal: 4   Link to Discussion Thread   My Member Revie I was able to take the Tee Claw to one of our open local ranges on Sunday. As stated above, I cut down a few tees ahead of time to the right height so I wouldn't have to do it at the range. I set the Tee Claw in the mat below then put my driver next to it to get the right height. This mat is an All Turf mat, which is similar to the Real Feel mats with a little less dense weave. The mat is made of woven fibers. At the range, the first thing I noticed was this range has two types of mats; a cheap imitation turf mat where the rubber tee goes and a tighter weave mat. The Tee Claw had no issue with the woven mat, but would not grab the cheap mat fibers. The video below shows this. The cheap mat only has fibers that run vertically and are not woven together. Undaunted, I used the woven mat for the test. I set the Tee Claw up with just one lanyard pulled straight back. This distance is about 30 inches. I hooked the tee under the mat with a tee as is suggested in the Tee Claw site video. The tee fits snug into the Tee Claw base. I used my driver to test the set up. The Tee Claw moved after the shot, but the tee stayed in place. I was worried that I would lose the tee, but this didn't happen. This will save on tees if this happens routinely. I took three swings with this set up. The Tee Claw came loose after the shot, but stayed on the mat.
      Next, I set up the Tee Claw with two lanyards. The second lanyard was set up as a guide for my swing path. This will come in handy as a training aid.
      After hitting, the tee stayed in. The Tee Claw moved. You can see below, it recoiled and twisted a bit. It took a few seconds to untangle it and set it back up. If you are the kind of player who rapid fire hits balls, this may get annoying. But if you are like me and take your time, the extra set up time is not an issue. If I am doing slow motion drills, I would use the rubber tee. But once I am hitting to observe ball flight, I would use the Tee Claw instead.
      Lastly, mats seem to be the key for the Tee Claw to work. Good mats with a weave work the best. I have two mats at home, the All Turf mat I showed above and one I got when buying a Birdie Ball net. They are below. I apologize for not cleaning the dead grass off the mat! It was cold out. The Tee Claw had no issues with either of these mats. I would take the mat type into consideration when you purchase the Tee Claw.
      At $15, the Tee Claw is not a big investment and worth the money for being able to set your tee height while practicing on mats. I've resorted to cutting down rubber tees to the right height before, but this is a better way. Try it out!
    • Claim Your Achievements Here!
      Got them all. I gave you the "Broke 80" award. All set! Congratulations to all who have claimed their awards so far!
    • My Swing (PhraseUniverse)
      Thanks for the advice. I will work on this over the week and post another video this weekend. 
    • Quitting a round early - Why Would You Quit?
      I can't recall ever quitting for a reason other than rain.  And I will play through a certain amount, especially if I have a cart with a windshield.
    • New GolfNow layout is Awful
      Maybe part of why I don't mind this layout is I just use the find courses near me option and just check hot deals. I rarely travel far to play considering there are at least 30 public courses within 20 miles of me. 
  • TST Blog Entries

  • Images

  • Today's Birthdays

    No users celebrating today
  • Blog Entries