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jaysquared

Do you have a "beater" club in your bag??

24 posts in this topic

Just wondering if any of y'all keep a beater club in your bag?? You know a club that you really won't care about scratching it up.. Reason I ask is I just got new clubs and scratched em up when I hit them our rocky places and I really would like to try to keep these clubs in good condition.. So if you have one what kind is it and where did you get it from?!
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Hmmm I do not really have a beater club in my bag...I play my clubs Driver thru Putter, I got fitted for them, so I use them as needed on the course. However hanging around the house I have a Callaway X-16 and a Ping i-3 OS 6-irons(demo clubs from Golfworks) I go hit practice balls with and an oil-can  64* cleveland wedge for the same(new from golfsmith say 2007). I have played with people that have a "beater" club used as a rescue club...say next to a tree or on the cart path...

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I personally don't carry a "beater club". If I'm on rocks that I feel may damage my clubhead to much I'll take an unplayable lie. I'm lucky and play several courses that aren't to bad and haven't been in that situation that often.
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My 3 iron is my least used club. If I'm attempting a punch from a sketchy lie, a left handed shot against a fence, etc. then I use my 3 because I don't mind if it gets dinged
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I used to keep a 5-iron for desert play when I used to go to AZ. I'd try to only use that club when hitting from the waste areas.

Now, I try and stay out of the desert (and don't go to AZ once a year either.)

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They're golf clubs...they're made to hit the ground. Sometimes they get scratched doing so. That doesn't affect their ability to hit the ball. You want pretty? Buy a picture!
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Originally Posted by David in FL

They're golf clubs...they're made to hit the ground. Sometimes they get scratched doing so. That doesn't affect their ability to hit the ball. You want pretty? Buy a picture!

You ever play out the desert? More like hitting off a gravel driveway than sand. Beyond scratches. Nicks and cuts. Just saying that I do think it is wise to ruin one club and not nick up the entire bag.

I never needed that kind of club in FL. :)

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You ever play out the desert? More like hitting off a gravel driveway than sand. Beyond scratches. Nicks and cuts. Just saying that I do think it is wise to ruin one club and not nick up the entire bag. I never needed that kind of club in FL. :)

I lived in the high desert for 5 years and have played hundreds of rounds of desert golf. Scratches, dinks and dings don't affect the playability of your irons, let alone "ruining" them.

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By that definition, all of my clubs are beater clubs.  To me, theyre just tools that are used to do the job.  If they get dinged, scratched or get rock chips; oh well.

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I do I have a club I tend to go to when the ball is on tops of a pile of pretty good size rocks or in between tree roots.  Its a used cleveland 49* wedge I got for $20.  It happens to be one of my favorite clubs to hit in any type of situation.  I'm stubborn when it comes to taking a drop, I will always play it as it lies if I think there is a slight chance I can advance it or get it on the green.  Just the other day I hit my ball into a creek and it landed on a rocky island out of the water.  The ball was sitting down around some bigger slate rocks and golf ball sized rocks as well.  Since I was in the hazard I could move any of the rocks to free the path of the club so I took my beater wedge and hit it greenside on my way to make par.  There actually wasn't any damage even though I drilled the rocks and hurt my wrist a bit.  I think it takes alot to break a club, unless you Rory or Schwartzel lol.

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When I lived in AZ, many folks would carry a desert club to hit from sketchy lies where rocks would beat the hell out of your iron. Just go buy one at a yard sale, Craigslist, eBay, used sporting goods shop, etc.
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Originally Posted by David in FL

They're golf clubs...they're made to hit the ground. Sometimes they get scratched doing so. That doesn't affect their ability to hit the ball. You want pretty? Buy a picture!

My thoughts exactly.   If one wants his clubs to remain clean, I just can't believe he is serious about golf.   All my clubs are "beater" b/c I use them often and without any reservation.  Isn't it like buying a sofa and putting a plastic cover on it so that it won't wear?   Sure it will have a good resale value but at what cost?

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Originally Posted by rkim291968

My thoughts exactly.   If one wants his clubs to remain clean, I just can't believe he is serious about golf.   All my clubs are "beater" b/c I use them often and without any reservation.  Isn't it like buying a sofa and putting a plastic cover on it so that it won't wear?   Sure it will have a good resale value but at what cost?


Honestly, with new clubs coming out all the time, if a club is more than 5 years old it isnt worth much anyways.

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Originally Posted by jaysquared

Just wondering if any of y'all keep a beater club in your bag?? You know a club that you really won't care about scratching it up.. Reason I ask is I just got new clubs and scratched em up when I hit them our rocky places and I really would like to try to keep these clubs in good condition.. So if you have one what kind is it and where did you get it from?!

Nope.  All of my clubs are the tools I use to play the game.  I display any battle scars proudly and certainly don't worry about it.  A few dings and scratches are just part of playing the game.  I take care of them, keep them clean, but I don't baby them.  I'd rather have the shine on my score card.

Originally Posted by rustyredcab

Quote:

Originally Posted by David in FL

They're golf clubs...they're made to hit the ground. Sometimes they get scratched doing so. That doesn't affect their ability to hit the ball. You want pretty? Buy a picture!

You ever play out the desert? More like hitting off a gravel driveway than sand. Beyond scratches. Nicks and cuts. Just saying that I do think it is wise to ruin one club and not nick up the entire bag.

I never needed that kind of club in FL. :)

I've played golf all over, from rural courses in the Great Plains to Palm Springs, from Florida to Idaho.  I've played from gravel, extreme hardpan, concrete and asphalt cart paths, tree roots, you name it, I've probably hit it.  I've never broken a club or damaged one beyond just putting a ding on the sole.  I've used a file to dress up an 8I I used to have when it smacked a rock which was under the surface, but all it did was make a ding where the face meets the sole.  The club still worked as it always had - no functional damage.

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If I'm playing in a round I care enough about to hit a ball out of the rocks I'm going to use whatever club gives me the best chance to score.

If I'm just playing a casual round with my friends or family I'm not going to hit any ball out of the rocks with any of my clubs (on purpose). I have accidentally hit some pretty good sized rocks that were underneath leaves or pine straw that I didn't know were there and so far haven't damaged a club enough to matter.

I did see a playing partner destroy a club one time by hitting a rock the size of a softball that was just underneath the fairway grass. It tore the rock completely out of the ground, broke the shaft, virtually ruined the face of the club, and cost him a hurt wrist. Evidently that rock had been there for many years and he just happened to be the one to find it.

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Dings and scratches should be worn proudly! My favourite club is my Taylormade Burner 2.0 gap wedge...has a nasty gouge in it from hitting a rock that was just under the grass surface. Still shoots like the day I got it.

I don't play well enough, nor often enough, to justify buying brand new expensive clubs anyways. I am playing a set of Hogan Edge irons right now that I picked up used. My next set of clubs will again be hand me downs from some rich feller who golfs 5 times a year yet thinks he needs brand new clubs every two years. Honestly, its a great way to pick up clubs that have a ton of life left and not break the bank.

To answer the original question, no, I do not carry a beater club. I use my clubs as necessary throughout the round.

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I just like to keep my clubs in at least good condition.. I know I can't prevent them from not being scratched but I don't want to end up ruining them by hitting out of rocks...
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Originally Posted by jaysquared

I just like to keep my clubs in at least good condition.. I know I can't prevent them from not being scratched but I don't want to end up ruining them by hitting out of rocks...

Unless you are smashing the sweet spot into rocks, gouges and dings won't effect the playability of your irons.

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