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Hacker James

Boccieri grip for putters

8 posts in this topic

In regards to "The Secret" grip for putters. I fail to see what difference back weighting a putter would make any difference given you re not really swinging it like another golf club. The overall weight could make a difference, but how would back weighting do anything?  Is this just another marketing ploy, or do I not understand something?

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I putted with one of the Callaway backweighted putters at Golfsmith this past weekend. It felt really solid and I could see how it could help people with shaky hands or mental issues with putting. I could also see how it might be beneficial for people that have trouble lag putting.

I think the trouble with the Secret Grip, though, is that if you put in on a standard putter, you might make the putter feel too light. But like you said, since the weight is under your hands, it may not make a difference in "swing weight".

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Originally Posted by Hacker James

In regards to "The Secret" grip for putters. I fail to see what difference back weighting a putter would make any difference given you re not really swinging it like another golf club. The overall weight could make a difference, but how would back weighting do anything?  Is this just another marketing ploy, or do I not understand something?

If you have all of that weight in the bottom of the club, how is that club head going to move unless you muscle it?

It's about balance points.

My "guess" and from feel is that the backweight promotes more of a pendulum feeling where the club "swings itself" and brings the balance of the putter upwards.

Having said that, I think backweighting is personal and there is no "one weight fits all."

That's why I'd prefer a brand such as balance-certified.com where you can purchase different weights or vary the position of the weight inside the grip.

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I took a look at Boccieri's web page where they are touting the "new" secret grip for putters. The heavy putter has been around for quite awhile and Boccieri supposedly was the inventor. In looking at the grip on their page, it appears that it is also shaped a little differently  unless its only an optical illusion. It looks a little "meatier" as well. As you said, it could give some the "feel" as if it helps. But you know what some say about "feel".  But what the hey....if it works for you...then it is your reality.

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Originally Posted by Hacker James

I took a look at Boccieri's web page where they are touting the "new" secret grip for putters. The heavy putter has been around for quite awhile and Boccieri supposedly was the inventor. In looking at the grip on their page, it appears that it is also shaped a little differently  unless its only an optical illusion. It looks a little "meatier" as well. As you said, it could give some the "feel" as if it helps. But you know what some say about "feel".  But what the hey....if it works for you...then it is your reality.

He developed the Heavy Putter Line where everything is heavier - I'm sure it helped a lot of people although I've not see one on a golf course.

He did not invent counterweighting ... and one size fits all is not the way to go.

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Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond

If you have all of that weight in the bottom of the club, how is that club head going to move unless you muscle it?

It's about balance points.

My "guess" and from feel is that the backweight promotes more of a pendulum feeling where the club "swings itself" and brings the balance of the putter upwards.

Having said that, I think backweighting is personal and there is no "one weight fits all."

That's why I'd prefer a brand such as balance-certified.com where you can purchase different weights or vary the position of the weight inside the grip.

You might have a good point there.  but with additional weight on the top of the grip, how could there be any change in balance? OTOH, most people do have a bit of the grip sticking out above their hands so you may very well be right. Its probably a subtle change however. No biggie as I don't think I would run right out and buy a new grip. The Odysee Metal-X seems to work well for me and since it is a belly putter, the additional length of the grip and shaft gives me more options. I do not anchor it, but the additional grip length (and shaft too) makes it more comfortable to use a claw grip, slide hands up or down e.t.c.  I also have the Cleveland Platinum black with a 400g head weight. It does require more effort and I don't really like it that much. (tried in vain to sell it).

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Originally Posted by Hacker James

You might have a good point there.  but with additional weight on the top of the grip, how could there be any change in balance?

Think about it like a see-saw. If you have a 200 person on one side, and a 100 pound person on the other, the balance point would be nearer the 200 pounder. If there were two people of the same weight, the balance point would be in the middle. Regardless of where you grip the club, the balance point will have changed if you backweight a grip.

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yah, I guess so. I just have a problem visualizing the lack of a fulcrum. In a clock pendulum for example, the shorter the rod, the faster the tempo. Same as for a metronome. Moot point actually, if it works, then  well...it works.

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