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Different chipping styles

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  1. 1. Chipping style

    • Hing and hold
      9
    • Putting style
      8

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15 posts in this topic

I'm trying to improve my chipping. I tend to hit behind it or scull it, basically very inconsistant.

I've seen two methods:

1) Most of your weight forward, hands forward, hinge your writs then come through holding that angle. Distance control is determined by how far back you take the club.

2) Putting stance, putting style form, straight back then straight forward, no wrist hinge. Distance control is determine by club selection

These seems like vastly different styles.

What has worked for you guys?

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I do something sort of in between for the really short green side chips (I'm not talking about the sort of long chip type shot where you try to hit a 40 yard wedge low, have it come in hot with tons of spin, and hop and stop).  Ball back in the stance, hands forward, weight a little forward, but then a no wrist swing.  Not really a putting stroke, but no wrist like the putter.

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I do something sort of in between for the really short green side chips (I'm not talking about the sort of long chip type shot where you try to hit a 40 yard wedge low, have it come in hot with tons of spin, and hop and stop).  Ball back in the stance, hands forward, weight a little forward, but then a no wrist swing.  Not really a putting stroke, but no wrist like the putter.

Pretty much this. I also open my stance pretty wide open and it's pretty close to a putter stroke but open. I also always use my PW and control distance by the length of my backswing just like my putter. Also have to make sure not to decelerate upon impact.

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I've gone back and forth on chipping styles recently. The "hinge & hold" method ala Phil Mickelson works well but takes some practice. Using this method you still have the opportunity to vary your club selection to control roll-out. I use this method when I'm 5+ yards off the green but then it's more of a pitch rather than a green-side bump & run type shot. The downside, for me at least, of using this method for green-side chips is that it really requires a lot of maintenance to have good results. If I practice a bit every week I generally have good results, If I don't practice it for a few weeks it's not unusual for me to "blade" a few easy chips.

The method I use for green-side chips is a "putting" style as taught by Paul Runyan (nicknamed "Little Poison" for his deadly shortgame).  Basically a dead hands/ dead wrists stroke to get the ball about 3-4 feet on the green and letting it roll to the hole. You vary the roll out by varying the clubs. Works great for me and is a very forgiving method. One unique aspect is Runyan advocates getting the shaft almost vertical and getting the club on it's toe. Seems strange but helps the ball come out without much spin.

Here's a good video showing the setup.

And another showing how to vary clubs to control roll-out

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When I find myself if hard lies in the rough I just open my stance and my club face a small amount. I play it like a flop shot but have te club face not as open I find it easy to control.
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Depends on the shot, most of the time i pitch the ball because i get more leeway for error with using the bounce of the club. If i have to chip, its usually if i am short sided, and i want the ball to come out short and soft. Basically ball is in the middle of my stance, short stance, hands just infront of the ball, and make a putter type stroke. The ball usually comes out soft, low spin.

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I too tend to hit pitch shots whenever possible, though they sort of blend in with Stan Utley style "chip" shots, i.e. as the shot gets shorter the ball moves a bit farther back and my hands move a bit forward, thus reducing bounce, I still hinge a bit on the back stroke, but the clubhead never passes the hands on the follow-through. My key for all green-side shots is relaxed. And I'm so lazy I only use my lob wedge.
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I treat it just like a putt.  It has the least moving parts and the least ways for it to go wrong.  I feel like hinge and hold is something that Phil made popular and lets be honest, almost none of us have the shortgame talent that Phil has.

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I use both styles. The hinge and hold is used by every pro for pitch shots. The putting style is used for chip shots. I use the putting style for any shot from the fringe to about 3 yds. off the green. Hinge and hold anything over that. Most guys that have trouble withe the hinge and hold have a tendency to hold the club to firm and causing a shank or they try to scoop it up and catch the ball to thin. I was taught to have very loose wrist and imagine a dime on the ground about an inch in front of the ball that you are trying to hit. Hope this helps.

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I've found that no matter what the chipping style, low runners or high and soft, putting ur weight forward is the key, except for a flop shot.
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Originally Posted by cda406

I've found that no matter what the chipping style, low runners or high and soft, putting ur weight forward is the key, except for a flop shot.

Originally Posted by saevel25

Nope, weight forward for a flop shot as well

Saevel's right. Take a look at this photo of Phil hitting a flop shot (over Roger Cleveland, Callaway wedge designer). You can see he still has a lot of his weight forward at this point. He can probably get away with transferring more weight during the swing on a flop shot, but for you and me, weight forward is an absolute must on flops.

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Originally Posted by Wayne1

I use both styles. The hinge and hold is used by every pro for pitch shots.

Not really.  They let the club head swing and overtake their hands, allowing them to "thump" the ground and use the bounce. Notice how they're just brushing the grass, not taking a divot.

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I've gone back and forth on chipping styles recently. The "hinge & hold" method ala Phil Mickelson works well but takes some practice. Using this method you still have the opportunity to vary your club selection to control roll-out. I use this method when I'm 5+ yards off the green but then it's more of a pitch rather than a green-side bump & run type shot. The downside, for me at least, of using this method for green-side chips is that it really requires a lot of maintenance to have good results. If I practice a bit every week I generally have good results, If I don't practice it for a few weeks it's not unusual for me to "blade" a few easy chips. The method I use for green-side chips is a "putting" style as taught by Paul Runyan (nicknamed "Little Poison" for his deadly shortgame).  Basically a dead hands/ dead wrists stroke to get the ball about 3-4 feet on the green and letting it roll to the hole. You vary the roll out by varying the clubs. Works great for me and is a very forgiving method. One unique aspect is Runyan advocates getting the shaft almost vertical and getting the club on it's toe. Seems strange but helps the ball come out without much spin. Here's a good video showing the setup. And another showing how to vary clubs to control roll-out

thanks. I'm going to test that out

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I use both techniques.

Putting with loft (though I wouldn't worry about straight back and straight through, even when putting) is the easiest shot for me. If the conditions allow it, I'll play it.

Hinge and hold might become necessary on longer shots that I want to run, or there's a breeze or a bank to hold the ball up - but there's a fine line between that sort of shot and playing a more lofted pitch shot.

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