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golfingnooob

my 5 iron snapped today

15 posts in this topic

it was just a cheap Dunlop iron and my first time using it. I may have hit the ground once or twice at the driving range, but then I hit the ball straight on and looked down to see myself holding half a shaft and the other half (with club head) on the ground. I have other Dunlop clubs I've used for a while and they haven't snapped, but for the rest of my basket I was holding back because I thought the others could snap. is this because I hit the ground, a one off or just because they're cheap clubs? should the store I purchased them from replaced it? the shafts are True Temper
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Dunlop irons are a decent low cost entry level set when you are just getting into golf.

As far as performance and durability............usually you get what you pay for.

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Originally Posted by teed off

Dunlop irons are a decent low cost entry level set when you are just getting into golf.

As far as performance and durability............usually you get what you pay for.


Do you think this was a one-off then? Should I stop worrying about the same thing happening to my other clubs?

btw here's what it looks like inside (incase anyone wondered)

it's thin metal with some weird material (to absorb impact... badly) and some plastic tubing

and here's where it snapped (if by any chance it indicates what I'm doing wrong or why it snapped at all)

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The club head looks extremely heavy and oversized and the shafts look to be cheaply constructed. My steel shafts are hollowed out. Then again I play Adams 1208 irons which are of better quality than Dunlop IMO but Dunlop makes some decent fairway woods with graphite shafts that I remember hiting a while back.
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If it's truly the first time you hit the club, then by all means, take it back in to the shop where you bought it and ask if there is any warranty. Even "cheap" clubs have some kind of warranty. At the worst, somebody could reshaft it for you. You can get a variety of steel shafts for under $10, plus labor to install. If you bought it at a golf store or pro shop, they should take care of you. I'm not so sure what a big box store would do, though.
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Low-price does not mean cheap or flimsy. The boxed clubs are low-priced because they don't change much from year to year. With a mature model, Dunlop doesn't have a lot of research & development money to recover.

It looks like a flawed shaft. Take the two parts of the club back to the store. They should be able to contact Dunlop for you. May be a small charge if set is out of warranty.

On the boxed sets: If you play three times a month during the main golf season, these clubs should last you a few years. If you play twice a week six months a year, and practice on the side, the clubs could start to fail sooner.

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Originally Posted by WUTiger

Low-price does not mean cheap or flimsy. The boxed clubs are low-priced because they don't change much from year to year. With a mature model, Dunlop doesn't have a lot of research & development money to recover.

It looks like a flawed shaft. Take the two parts of the club back to the store. They should be able to contact Dunlop for you. May be a small charge if set is out of warranty.

On the boxed sets: If you play three times a month during the main golf season, these clubs should last you a few years. If you play twice a week six months a year, and practice on the side, the clubs could start to fail sooner.

bought 'em last week


I contacted the place I bought them from (european-golf-online.com) and he said he will send another one out to me pretty good service

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The club head looks extremely heavy

How does it look heavier than other GI clubs?

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It looks like a freakin stop sign bro. That club head is EXTREMELY over sized.
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Again, I asked how it looks [U]heavier[/U] than other irons of the same type.
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Because of the size. Bigger clubheads weigh more. The hosel alone is like 4inches long let alone the the canoe paddle for the head itself but youre right bro.....it might be chrome painted,wood for all I know lol.
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Because of the size. Bigger clubheads weigh more. The hosel alone is like 4inches long let alone the the canoe paddle for the head itself but youre right bro.....it might be chrome painted,wood for all I know lol.

I think you are looking at the lower part of the club thinking that the head is severely oversized. If you take both the grip side and the head side together the club does not look that outrageous. I had to look twice too. I've never seen a club break in the middle before. I have broken many at the hosel when I first started and swung like the club was a baseball bat.

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Regardless.......even for a gi set it looks extremely oversized IMO.
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Originally Posted by Micah

Regardless.......even for a gi set it looks extremely oversized IMO.

Boxed sets are normally SGI.

Anyway, bigger heads are easier for beginners to hit. In his next post, Micah will probably tell us he started using blades at age 7.

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I started using blades at age 7.
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