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Lanctot

Graphite or steel shaft for irons?

35 posts in this topic

Okay so here is the deal.. I have a very fast swing (dont ask how fast I dont know the exact speed but Ive been told by the pro at our club it was fast so Ill take his word for it... or lets just pretend I have a fast one...) and a short swing so basically I never do a full swing; it looks more like an old person swing..

Im not a 70s player more like high 80s or 90s

Would graphite shaft be a good option for me or should I stick with steel since Ill get more control due to the weight?

I know the best way is to try but in the event there is a good deal, am just wondering if I should jump on it...

Thank you for the help and information!!

PS: oh and off topic I do have a hard time hitting my iron 5 and below should I acquire a hybrid with a 27 degree loft to replace it? (iron 6 and higher is perfectly fine..)

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Graphite shafts are easier on the hands, not as much shock when you hit the ball off the sweet spot. Graphite shafts have more torque than steel (usually) and the lighter the shaft the more torque you have. This feels better but gives less control...so not many pros use graphite shaft irons...some of the pro ladies do. Lighter shaft means faster swing over the same swing distance and therefore more power. More flex, like in a senior A shaft, not to be confused by the S for stiff, also gives more power but like I said, less control. Graphite is usually more expensive. I have all graphite clubs in my Callaway bag...some stiff, all irons regular no light or senior shafts. I love em.

They are easy on my worn out hands and I can swing em faster. I take a big swing and I am not all that slow. I would not trade them for steel shafts at all. I have a good set of steel shafts as well....gi irons almost blade like with stepless Tru Temper Dynamic gold rifle shafts, really good clubs but I hit my graphite shafted semi hybird Callaways a lot better or at least it feels like I do. I expect to use them for a long, long time.

Now I posted the conventional wisdom but lets get right down to it. I play with a friend who is a 4 handicapper. His irons and wedges (Rocketbladz) are all senior shafts. He can place a ball just about where he wants it. I hit my graphite irons better than the steel irons I own. The conventional wisdom really does not take into full account the new technology that is out there.

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For me its graphite all the way.  Graphite is lighter, so you will get more clubhead speed and more distance.  You dont play a steel shaft in your driver, so why play steel shafts in your irons?

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For me its graphite all the way.  Graphite is lighter, so you will get more clubhead speed and more distance.  You dont play a steel shaft in your driver, so why play steel shafts in your irons?


Yes, but irons are essentially about accuracy and not distance. I'd much rather a bit less distance but more accuracy in all of my irons - they're the scoring clubs.

That said, graphite technology has come on a lot and it's not as clear cut a difference as it used to be. You've also got some interesting, very light steel options now as well.

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Yes, but irons are essentially about accuracy and not distance. I'd much rather a bit less distance but more accuracy in all of my irons - they're the scoring clubs.

That said, graphite technology has come on a lot and it's not as clear cut a difference as it used to be. You've also got some interesting, very light steel options now as well.


What makes you think that steel shafts are more accurate?  The notion that graphite is more whippy and more difficult to control is an old, outdated myth.

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For what it is worth, Brandt Snedeker uses graphite shafts.

http://golfweek.com/news/2013/feb/11/shaft-month-graphite-gains-momentum-irons/

A good point. I think the SteelFiber are a graphite/metal composite though.

What makes you think that steel shafts are more accurate?  The notion that graphite is more whippy and more difficult to control is an old, outdated myth.

Oh, I don't know. The fact that the people who earn their money from playing golf (almost) exclusively play steel in their irons might have something to do with it.

Also, why be deliberately biased in your quotations as well? Are you deliberately ignoring the bit where I said "...graphite technology has come on a lot and it's not as clear cut a difference as it used to be." ?

I actually think the shaft market for irons is pretty interesting at the moment and the next few years are probably going to be more so.

I daresay a lot of the advertising will be to people who think the game is all about "clubhead speed and more distance" though.

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A good point. I think the SteelFiber are a graphite/metal composite though.

Oh, I don't know. The fact that the people who earn their money from playing golf (almost) exclusively play steel in their irons might have something to do with it.

Also, why be deliberately biased in your quotations as well? Are you deliberately ignoring the bit where I said "...graphite technology has come on a lot and it's not as clear cut a difference as it used to be." ?

I actually think the shaft market for irons is pretty interesting at the moment and the next few years are probably going to be more so.

I daresay, a lot of the advertising will be to people who think the game is all about "clubhead speed and more distance" though.


A lot of people who make their living playing golf used played blades too.  Things change.

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A lot of people who make their living playing golf used played blades too.  Things change.


They do indeed. Good job really as what would we all discuss the pros and cons of??

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They do indeed. Good job really as what would we all discuss the pros and cons of??


Im sure we'd all find something else to argue about.  Sports, the weather, which TGC girl is the hottest and where or not her boobs are fake.

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I'm playing graphite in my current irons.  I selected it because it felt much softer than the stock metal option that was offered to me when I bought them.  I'd really like to think that some significant percentage of my off course shots were the fault of unexpected shaft flex.  Sadly, that's probably not it.

I'm sniffing around some new irons for 2014 and will definitely be letting my pro fitter help me with the selection of shaft, whether steel or graphite.  I know the majority of pros choose steel, and probably for the same reasons of consistency that has been "traditional" for years, even with advances in graphite technology.  Those guys swings are so much more powerful than mine, however, that I really don't think their reasons may translate to my needs.

One of my primary objectives when looking at new sticks is going to be distance consistency.  I know "our longest irons ever" is the mantra for club advertisements these days, but I really don't care so much about that.  If my fitter thinks I'll get better distance control from steel, steel it will be and I'll get used to how it feels.  If he doesn't think it matters so much, I'll probably go graphite because it is more comfortable.

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As others have stated graphite shaft construction has come a long way but so has steel.  Players looking for lighter shafts can still play steel shafts as most manufacturers offer a lightweight version now.  Graphite seems to be the better choice for those with injuries or arthritis that wish to minimize the impact felt in the hands when the club head hits the ground.

Most PGA Tour players are athletes that play the equipment that provides them the most confidence.  While graphite shafts for irons have made great strides there is still some questions regarding consistency that they need to overcome as well as the stigma that only old people play them.

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You should get the shaft by the weight. Graphite are lighter usually. I'm 15 now And played 105 gram steel shafts for over a year. Unless you are like over 60 and drive it 170 than steel is what you want
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Unless you are like over 60 and drive it 170 than steel is what you want

Why?  Doesnt everyone want more distance?

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For long term health benefits - shoulder, rotator cuff, and wrist injuries - and a general wearing of tissue - I think you're better off going with a composite product like the Aerotech Steelfibers - it offers the low(er) torque benefits of steel without the wear. Feel is not as direct, but who wants the shoulder issues? I'd rather play without pain or injury over the long haul.

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Why?  Doesnt everyone want more distance?

At the cost of a loss of feedback, losing the clubhead in the backswing, and adjusting to a whippier shaft? No thanks.

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At the cost of a loss of feedback, losing the clubhead in the backswing, and adjusting to a whippier shaft? No thanks.


Id love to see some proof that backs up any of those claims.

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You tell us what the benefits of graphite is?
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