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goatlord

Question about OEM shafts

12 posts in this topic

I own a Taylormade driver with Diamana Kaili 80 X-stiff shaft (Taylormade) and I´m getting soon Titleist 901d2 with Diamana ahina 72 x-stiff (Titleist).

I would be interested to know, are those a lot different than aftermarket versions of the shafts? Please, save me from personal opinions, I would be interested about torques and other measurable stuff.

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If you knew the torque figures, then what difference do you think it would make to your game? Sorry, that's a personal opinion.

If you want to know the figures, then simply visit the respective websites of TM, Titleist and Mitsubishi Rayon and the specs are all laid bare for you to cast a critical eye over.

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I own a Taylormade driver with Diamana Kaili 80 X-stiff shaft (Taylormade) and I´m getting soon Titleist 901d2 with Diamana ahina 72 x-stiff (Titleist).

I would be interested to know, are those a lot different than aftermarket versions of the shafts? Please, save me from personal opinions, I would be interested about torques and other measurable stuff.

http://www.mitsubishirayongolf.com/product.php?cmd=nextdia〈=en

ahina will be a bit heavier and lower launching for the same flex.

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As Nemicu pointed out, most of the spec information is extremely simple to look up via google if you know the model. As far as compilations of data:

Golfworks has a shaft rating system (shaft MPF) that gives a general comparison of the profiles and flexes. They're probably the best collection and the easiest to understand, plus they have most of the detailed specs on the sales pages. They won't have "made for" shaft models but they have a wide variety of aftermarket models.

Each shaft gets a 4 digit code. The first number is overall flex from 1-5, 5 being X stiff and 3 being regular in general terms. The second represents a few measurements including torque and weight to determine whether it's geared towards control or distance though most of the good quality shafts on the market fall under B or C. The third is trajectory, determined by bend point and profile which determines the amount of launch; this can be changed by tipping however so in the case of fairway woods it can be iffy. The final number is essentially weight and torque, and it supposedly refers to the directional tendency of the shaft; I don't buy into this one but the good shafts are almost all M or H, anything that adds distance or reduces slice under this system is basically a ladies or senior shaft.

http://www.clevelandgolf.com/pdfs/2013-Custom-Catalog.pdf

This gives 4 areas of the shaft a flex number from 0-9, which can be very useful in determining profile if you understand shaft design well. It is based on data and not subjective so it's useful at least. Miyazaki shafts all use this method to rate their flex and profile. For example, my driver shaft is a 5689, meaning a stiff butt with an XX stiff tip which makes it low launching and stable while still feeling reasonably soft in the hands.

http://www.golfshaftreviews.info/

This site also does some very good testing but only covers a small number of models.

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If you knew the torque figures, then what difference do you think it would make to your game? Sorry, that's a personal opinion.

If you want to know the figures, then simply visit the respective websites of TM, Titleist and Mitsubishi Rayon and the specs are all laid bare for you to cast a critical eye over.

I was trying to avoid getting a ton of those "ahina is sh*t, get some other" -style "personal opinions," which are plentiful over other threads. I am interested in this issue purely by scientific curiosity and possible reason for some odd twitches in shafts while hitting.

Despite extensive search in Taylormade web page, I was incapable of finding out the "Made for Taylormade Diamana Kaili 80 X-stiff" torque and compare it to aftermarket Kaili-version which was available immediately in Mitsubishi Rayon web page. Taylormade does not point out easily where they hold the past model cheat sheets.

Now, the question was: how do the "made for whachamacallit" differs from genuine aftermarket 300 € shaft which has same name?

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More often than not, TM use the "real deal" shafts with their own graphics - so the difference is zero. Even Titleist use more "real deal" shafts than not these days.

Because this topic has been beaten to death over the last ten years, I'll attempt to summarise in brief:

"Made for" shafts are intended to fit the largest possible potential target audience paired to the stock OEM club. It works pretty well.

"Real deal" aftermarket shafts are intended to fit a smaller percentage of specific player requirements who fit into their playing characteristics.

Money - and I know it's hard to grasp for most Americans - has absolutely nothing to do with performance.

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Now, the question was: how do the "made for whachamacallit" differs from genuine aftermarket 300 € shaft which has same name?

The genuine after market shafts are supposed to have tighter specs and quality control but that is based on what I've read.  I don't work for a manufacturer and unless one did the best they could do is speculate as to the differences if there are any.

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That´s more like it. So, not so much findings of different torques and other measurable issues. As a Finn, I don´t believe in money, I´ll buy everything second hand.

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More often than not, TM use the "real deal" shafts with their own graphics - so the difference is zero. Even Titleist use more "real deal" shafts than not these days.

Because this topic has been beaten to death over the last ten years, I'll attempt to summarise in brief:

"Made for" shafts are intended to fit the largest possible potential target audience paired to the stock OEM club. It works pretty well.

"Real deal" aftermarket shafts are intended to fit a smaller percentage of specific player requirements who fit into their playing characteristics.

Money - and I know it's hard to grasp for most Americans - has absolutely nothing to do with performance.

@Nemicu ,

This is uncalled for.  I respect your opinion and look forward to your insight regarding club making.  But continually crapping on Americans in each post will not win you more respect.  You will find that the vast majority of forum members do not fall into your preconceived stereotyping.

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Oh lighten up. If anything, your response only affirms the trait which every forum sadly is awash with.
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Oh lighten up. If anything, your response only affirms the trait which every forum sadly is awash with.

You need to lighten up as well my friend.  My post was polite.

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Oh lighten up. If anything, your response only affirms the trait which every forum sadly is awash with.

....the trait with which every forum is sadly awash.

There are many such traits.  Poor grammar among them. :-$

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Sorry, that was uncalled for.  I just couldn't resist.

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