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Kev McDonald

Leaving the club behind!?! come to the ball on the inside !?! To much wrist or not enough!?!?!

6 posts in this topic

The title of the thread is just a selection of the many swing thoughts that I went through until recently. I have only taken up the game in the last three years but I am obsessed with the technique of the swing. Having looked through many useful videos I have discovered a feel in the swing that helps me, so I thought I'd share it and maybe help others.

1. In the back swing I try and ensure the club is horizontal when its level with my hip and the club head is just outside the hands.

2. A wide arc and wrist hinge follows so the club is then almost vertical as your hands are level with your chest. Above all this don't sway away from the ball in the back swing. almost feel you are leaning left if you have too.

3. A slight hip bump TOWARDS the target (I found if that is off it leads to trouble) and a smooth turn of the hips. This should start the down swing correctly.

4. Now this it the part that always got me but I have found you need to feel your right wrist is still cocked all the way to hip level to get the club back to a horizontal position as in the take away. And try and feel that the club is still hinged as you approach the ball.

5. Turning the hands over to connect with the ball is all about timing and its obviously harder the longer the club.

6. A "balanced finish" as the pros always say does work.

I have been told a million times my swing is too fast therefore less controlled, once I started to slow down my feel improved dramatically and to my surprise distance didn't suffer but in some shots improved.

I am by no way an expert and I hope this has been an easy read, it makes sense in my head. I realize swings are so individual. just look at major winner Jim Furyk's compared to Luke Donald so now I am just trying to remain consistent with is really tough when on the course.

I hope it helps someone. :-)

:cleve: :nike: :adidas: :callaway:

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5. Turning the hands over to connect with the ball is all about timing and its obviously harder the longer the club. I hope it helps someone. :-) :cleve: :nike: :adidas: :callaway:

In general when you speak about feels they don't always translate the same to other players.. Specifically I think he idea of turning the hands over is one that I just don't get and jot do I want to.. If the golf swing had anything to do with turning the wrist over I think we are all in trouble.. Maybe it is a feel used, but a conscious action? I highly doubt it is part of the golf swing or that it adds anything to the golf swing.. Timing is something that probably results from good sequencing, but active action by them? Hard to believe!

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Quote:
Above all this don't sway away from the ball in the back swing. almost feel you are leaning left if you have too.

This seems like a dangerous swing thought and a good way to start a reverse pivot.

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This seems like a dangerous swing thought and a good way to start a reverse pivot.

Feel ain't real, and a lot of people may have to feel that to stop from moving off the golf ball during their backswings.

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Quote:
Specifically I think he idea of turning the hands over is one that I just don't get and jot do I want to.. If the golf swing had anything to do with turning the wrist over I think we are all in trouble.. Maybe it is a feel used, but a conscious action? I highly doubt it is part of the golf swing or that it adds anything to the golf swing

Some people describe turning the hands as allowing the left hand to speed up against the right. Ben Hogans say the left wrist should pronate as it hits the ball. Either way it should be a conscious decision but it should still happen to allow the club face to return to the ball for a cleaner strike. Feel is a way to describe how I get to that position sometimes. forcing it will make you push it left as you'll over compensate.

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I'm assuming you meant should not be a conscious decision below.. [quote name="Kev McDonald" url="/t/74463/leaving-the-club-behind-come-to-the-ball-on-the-inside-to-much-wrist-or-not-enough#post_988326"]Some people describe turning the hands as allowing the left hand to speed up against the right. Ben Hogans say the left wrist should pronate as it hits the ball. Either way it should be a conscious decision but it should still happen to allow the club face to return to the ball for a cleaner strike. Feel is a way to describe how I get to that position sometimes. forcing it will make you push it left as you'll over compensate. [/quote] [quote name="Kev McDonald" url="/t/74463/leaving-the-club-behind-come-to-the-ball-on-the-inside-to-much-wrist-or-not-enough#post_988243"] 5. Turning the hands over to connect with the ball is all about timing and its obviously harder the longer the club. [/quote] What you mentioned in your answer is not the same as what was mentioned in your original post.. Also, I'm not sure what you mean by sometimes forcing it will make you push left? Do you mean pull left because you have closed the club face so much at the point of impact relative to the target line? Either way we agree turning the hands is not a conscious effort and no timing issues to worry about!
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