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trap

Driving Range - How many balls?

30 posts in this topic

Hi guys,

I've been playing for about 2.5 months and got so addicted to golf, that taking a day off is next to impossible and I end up in a golf club anyway for a sandwich and a cup of tea while watching people finishing the 18th hole :)

My question is - when you are out on a driving range, how many balls do you use on an average session? I am feeling quite exhausted after 150-180, but I notice people practicing there with at least 250+ ? Is it a matter of training? I am 28, average build, but haven't done much sport before.

Love this forum! Probably read like 20+ pages completely of different topics in the last 5 days. A lot of very helpful people around here! Glad I joined in!

P.S Sorry for any English mistakes, not my first language :)

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Welcome, Trap!

150-180 balls in one session is a lot!

I usually hit a medium bucket, which is about 60 balls.

But it takes me about an hour to an hour and a half.  I practice by going through the same routine as if I am actually playing.  For example, I line up my shot, and go through checking the stance, posture, and the grip before I hit.  I do that for each shot.

Just remember, it's NOT how many you hit, but it's how well you practice.

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Agree with @Yukari . Hitting that many balls is more likely to ingrained bad habits than good ones. Once you get fatigued you start to quit on your pivot, weight shift etc... Personally, I wish they had 20 ball buckets. That would be perfect for my practice needs.
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Usually 250 balls, But, a good majority of those are used for my drills, some for short, med, and longer chip shots, and pitch shots. I think out of the 250 I hit last night, maybe 15 were with driver. I tend to work on my scoring irons, i.e. PW to 7i alot.

As for getting tired, I would say that maybe you are just Pounding balls, instead of having a Structured practice plan, i.e working on your weaknesses, whether it be your set up, grip swing, ect. and do them SLOWLY. I'm almost 66 yrs old, have a bad back and after 250 balls, I feel pretty good, unless my back acts up.

Rest every now and then, if you have a drill your doing, do it with purpose, and take your time, ranges don't charge by the hour..lol

Slowly over time, your body will get accustom to hitting balls, heck when I was playing a bunch in the mid 90's, I'd hit up to 400 balls a day..which got to be kind of expensive... :doh:

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Agree with @Yukari. Hitting that many balls is more likely to ingrained bad habits than good ones. Once you get fatigued you start to quit on your pivot, weight shift etc...

Personally, I wish they had 20 ball buckets. That would be perfect for my practice needs.

20..? shoot takes me at least 30 just to get warmed up...haha

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I hit 200 blls when I go practice ... its the most cost efficient too for me $15 ... under the lights ... I practice with a purpose.  I do have to wear headphones with my tunes loud ... especially when the guy next to me is teaching his girlfriend or buddy ... that way I stay in my thoughts are practice zone ...

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112 balls is the cheapest price I get for the range balls.

But oftentimes we split the 112 to about 56 balls between me and my dad.

Then we take a coffee break afterwards.

No noticable difference between hitting 112 alone at the range, or 56 at a time though...

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Unlimited balls,  3 hours time, $12 is the best option for me at the local range. I hit about 300 balls. Sometimes get weary and find that this tiredness, esp my legs, forces me to 'get back to basics', and that is good.  I would prefer to play more but each time on the course is $100+..

As far as beginners and fatigue, such is common as your body and mind are working overtime to do it correctly. I can swim for 45 mins at normal pace but beginners get into the water with fear and confusion and can't last 10 mins before deep fatigue.

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I only ever hit about 100, max. Any more than that and I can feel myself getting tired. I generally manage to get an hour to an hour and a half out of that though.
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I could literally hit balls all day, it doesn't fatigue me that much. I've had long practice sessions and walked 30ish holes in the same day, 7-8 hours total and still fresh as a daisy.

However, I usually get the best results from 2-4 buckets, any more than that and I tend to get off track a bit.

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I could literally hit balls all day, it doesn't fatigue me that much. I've had long practice sessions and walked 30ish holes in the same day, 7-8 hours total and still fresh as a daisy.

However, I usually get the best results from 2-4 buckets, any more than that and I tend to get off track a bit.

Your such a Stud..... :-$

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Welcome, Trap!

150-180 balls in one session is a lot!

I usually hit a medium bucket, which is about 60 balls.

But it takes me about an hour to an hour and a half.  I practice by going through the same routine as if I am actually playing.  For example, I line up my shot, and go through checking the stance, posture, and the grip before I hit.  I do that for each shot.

Just remember, it's NOT how many you hit, but it's how well you practice.

+1 on this.  I am 54 and hitting a lot of balls is counter productive.  Once fatigue sets in, my form goes down and I miss the point of the session.  With a medium bucket, I will save 10 - 15 for pitches and other shots I wank to try like get out of trouble shots.  I work on one specific thing during a session from my instructor using slower swings with a few full speed swings.  I get much better results with that than hitting bucket after bucket.  If I had three hours to hit balls, I would play instead.

After the range session, I will spend time on the short game if I have time.

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For me, 50 or 60 balls max. AND focus on making every shot count. Otherwise it's counterproductive.

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My range has 60 ball buckets and I start to lose focus with that big pile of balls staring at me, which is why I prefer to practice at home with a net of some kind and a handful of balls. I find it easier to stay on point with my practice and not get sucked into machine gun mode. That's just me and YMMV.

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My range only has one size bucket, and I think it is about 40. Usually I hit one bucket, sometimes two. For a good practice session, one is not quite enough, but two is too many for me. I either get tired or stale. Sometimes I go to work on something specific, and sometimes just to sort of go through the bag. A good practice session for me is about 1.5-2.5 hours, including 30-45 minutes of chipping and putting.
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I've found that, for me, it's not the number of balls I hit but instead HOW I hit them. If I'm just swinging away with the driver and am hitting the balls as fast as I can tee them up, it's both counter productive and quite tiring. My preferred way to practice is grab some balls (usually a medium or large bucket for practice, a small for a pre-round warmup. Sizes are 40, 80, and 120 balls) and head out to the range, but I won't hit a full shot for at least the first five swings. The first target on the range is a 3/4 60* from the front grass and a "full" (75% power is the max when I hit a wedge with a full swing for accuracy reason) from the back grass, so I always start with a gap wedge and pitch it halfway to the green the first two shots. Then I transition up into bigger swings and shorter clubs until I've hit about 20 wedge shots at that green. From there, when I've loosened up, I tend to practice whatever needs the most work. Recently my tee shots have been my Achilles heel so I've spent a good portion of time working with the 3-wood and driver, but it really depends on what needs work. The biggest thing about this though is that I will never just hit balls to hit balls. Every shot I go through my pre-shot routine, pick a specific target, and then hit the shot. Once the shot is hit I usually go and at least brush the sand off my club with my toe because a dirty club is a pet peeve of mine, but sometimes I go and wipe it down completely. All this usually means that I end up spending around a minute on each ball, except for the first 10 where I'm just trying to stretch out and loosen up. At that pace I can keep practicing for as long as it continues to feel productive to do so without getting tired provided that I eat and drink plenty of water.
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Your such a Stud.....

Well, maybe. But 5k of running or a few sets of lifting and I'm usually wishing for death. Just have a pretty well conditioned core and legs, anything requiring much muscle mass or endurance and I'm screwed.

The point I was trying to make was that I do best when I hit far less than my capacity. Being patient is better than being able to hit hundreds of balls on the range.

EDIT: Out of curiosity, does everyone here pay by the bucket, have a membership plan, or a home setup? I personally have unlimited range with my membership but I think a lot of guys have different habits if they pay.

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EDIT: Out of curiosity, does everyone here pay by the bucket, have a membership plan, or a home setup? I personally have unlimited range with my membership but I think a lot of guys have different habits if they pay.

I have unlimited range use with my membership, but only use it to warm up before I play.

If I am driving up to the club, I may as well play a round. I will use the putting green after a weekday round if I end up finishing too fast.

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