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Fourputt

Do you stop for snacks at the turn?

0   37 votes

  1. 1. Do you stop?

    • No, I bring my own.
      14
    • Sometimes, but only to grab a drink.
      9
    • Yes, usually, but just a candy or granola bar.
      0
    • I grab a hot dog and a Coke, then eat when the flow of play allows.
      12
    • I play at a private club where I can stop for a sit down lunch.
      0
    • I do what I want, take as long as I want and don't care if it bothers anyone else
      2
    • My course has a call phone on the 9th (or 8th) tee and I just pick it up on my way to the 10th tee.
      0

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30 posts in this topic

The title says it all - what do you do most often when you do stop?  My course has a snack bar right on the way from the 9th green to the 10th tee with candy, power bars, chips, cold sandwiches, and preheated hotdogs and brats, and soft drinks and Gatorade ready to grab and go.

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About half the time, usually just for beer.
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No, never. I just put a  Gatorade,  protein bar and 5 hour energy in the bag before every round.

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About half the time, usually just for beer.

Yeah, I forgot.  The snack bar has beer too. :doh:

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Both courses I play most have coolers on the cart so really not necessary to stop. One keeps the coolers behind the bar counter and fills it will ice and whatever you buy. Beer is cheaper to buy as a 6 pack at both courses. I keep jerky and granola in my bag. I know I shouldn't but lately I've been bringing a picnic dinner because I play after work. Usually the grill has shut down unless it's a league night. I bring a couple rolls of sushi and eat it quick.
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I like to grab a dog and a soda most of the time, will call it in so we don't hold anyone up. But it seems right now the courses are so backed up it really does not matter if we stop and order.

Last Sunday 50% of the course had min 2 groups waiting on every hole, we played 16 in a little over 5 hours and finally had to leave.

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Since our buddy ol' pal forgot us beer drinkers, I voted for the hot dog and coke and play when flow allows it. :beer:

The course that I play 90% of the time has nothing available outside, but the food is already cooked and on warmers (brats, burgers, hot dogs, chili dogs and chips/candy bars, etc.). I run in, grab beer(s) and a hot dog and hop back on the cart and go. We usually eat at the 10th tee if there's nobody directly behind us, or we'll eat between shots while playing.

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I was between Sometime and grab a dog.  Depends on the time of day.  It literally takes 2 minutes at most.  If the course does not have a snack bar at the turn, I will grab extra water and a snack before the start.

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If it's lunchtime or thereabouts I'll grab a dog and a beer and scoot.  Eat on the 10th as pace of play allows.  I'll NEVER lose position as a result.

If we play a little earlier, I'll just wait until after the round for a bite.

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Some courses are setup better for stopping at the turn. Home course neither 1, 9 or 10 is near the clubhouse. There are no potties until the 4th and 14th holes so almost everyone stops. The drive from the 9th hole to the house is several hundred yards and from the house to 10 tee is about an 1/8 mile so you have time because the group behind will never be right behind you. I've never seen a backup on the 10th tee. We also have a call box on 8th tee and you can have a boxed meal waiting. They don't have any prepared food besides bags of nuts and bars at this course. It works fine not having a snack shack to run up to.
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I voted for the one you put there for me just for fun. I usually start with a salad, then a steak and potato with a glass of wine, some desert of course after all I am not an animal. Then when I am done I usually tie all the rangers up in a shed and start hitting balls into as many groups as possible. If someone complains I go to the parking lot and break every car's windows to make sure I get the car of the guy who complained. Then light the clubhouse on fire and go home.

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If it's lunchtime or thereabouts I'll grab a dog and a beer and scoot.  Eat on the 10th as pace of play allows.  I'll NEVER lose position as a result.

If we play a little earlier, I'll just wait until after the round for a bite.

Count me in on this group ...

My assumption has always been that the course prepares dogs for this very reason ... to allow a group to quickly grab a dog or sandwich and get back inline with little no delay ... I would think it would be a revenue stream for them ...

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I've played my home course easily a hundred times, and I've never stopped at the turn. Done at #9? Right onto #10. I've stopped at the turn at other courses maybe one time in 20, only for a quick hot dog or something. I won't do it if I can't call from the 9th tee (or, in one case, from my cell at the 9th tee since I knew in advance they took phone orders, but didn't have an on-course way to order). I bring a clif bar and usually a sandwich with me. Sometimes bananas or other fruit. That lasts me quite a bit.
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My preference is for no stops unless nature is calling loudly.

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I need to start bringing a granola bar or something, my stomach is always growling halfway through the back 9.

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I need to start bringing a granola bar or something, my stomach is always growling halfway through the back 9.

Get a Cliff Bar. Those are amazing. I usually eat one for breakfast 3-4 times a week. The peanut butter one or chocolate chip is good. It has a gritty protein powder taste, but it's really filling and packs a big time boost. Great in the Summer time too when it's really hot out because it sits just right.

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Generally, I bring just water and/or a drink. If the pace of play is pretty fast, and I'm off the 18th hole within 3 hours. The fastest round with a cart was a little under 2 hours, and I still had to wait sometimes.

However, my feeling is that snack bars exist for a reason.

Even though it is rare that I get an actual lunch. When I do it is usually a burger and fries which takes about 6-7 minutes to prepare. I usually ask if I can putt out, then get the food ordered. By the time I have teed off the 10th hole, the food is ready for pickup and we did not cost the party behind us any time at all. One might argue that we play slower, but since most of my partners are fast players we usually end up waiting at all the tee boxes. The food is usually gone before the 12th tee, and we are replacing time we would be just sitting around swinging our clubs with eating.

Sometimes I also bring hard boiled eggs, cold cuts and other assorted snacks including peanut butter granola bars.

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