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BenRowell

Hip Rotation

15 posts in this topic

How do you perform the right rotation of the hips? I have seen online different ways this can be done for example a bump and then rotation of the hips and a simple way by just straightening the left leg. This leaves me very confused as which one to use and which one is the best the reason for this question is because I want to start practicing more and want to make sure I am using the right hip rotation instead of finding out later on and having to change it in the future, thanks!

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Personally I focus on shifting forward and upwards, the rotation just happens by itself. Different people need to feel different things so I doubt someone will be able to give a definitive answer to how it should feel. The best bet is to video yourself trying a variety of different feels and then go with whichever one gives the best results. Good luck.
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Personally I focus on shifting forward and upwards, the rotation just happens by itself. Different people need to feel different things so I doubt someone will be able to give a definitive answer to how it should feel. The best bet is to video yourself trying a variety of different feels and then go with whichever one gives the best results. Good luck.

Yep, my favorite friend right now. Hips rotate and extend!!! Right now i am not sure if I am feeling rotation, but I do feel the extension. Yea for me the rotation is a non feel because I think it happens more automatically if other things are set into motion.

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Welcome ... Lots of good info if you look or search for it ... There was a good thread recently on this very topic, just can't remember the title of it ...
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Personally I focus on shifting forward and upwards, the rotation just happens by itself. Different people need to feel different things so I doubt someone will be able to give a definitive answer to how it should feel. The best bet is to video yourself trying a variety of different feels and then go with whichever one gives the best results. Good luck.

Yep, my favorite friend right now. Hips rotate and extend!!! Right now i am not sure if I am feeling rotation, but I do feel the extension. Yea for me the rotation is a non feel because I think it happens more automatically if other things are set into motion.

Same, here. I have to feel the extension, not the rotation, because I have a tendency to spin out from rotating too early in the downswing.

@BenRowell , if you want a good thread on hip movement in general, check this one out:

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@billchao thanks, that is the thread I was thinking about!  Thanks for posting it.

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Right.  Slide your hips forward, towards the target, on the downswing , but not backwards on the backswing. And you must also rotate the hips.

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Be careful!  This whole "rotate", "slide" or "rotate and slide" the hips is a can of worms.  ;)

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Be careful!  This whole "rotate", "slide" or "rotate and slide" the hips is a can of worms.  ;)

Actually most amateurs don't rotate or slide their hips enough through impact.

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This was a big discussion topic last spring at the St. Louis Golf Expo. Both teaching pros and exercise physiologists commented on this during different presentations, which discussed X-Factor vs. Classic golf swings.

X-Factor comes from a Jim McLean article in a 1992 Golf Magazine issue. Basically X-factor is the difference between the upper body and lower body rotation on the backswing: McLean said that the greater the difference, the more power the golfer generated in his swing. Then, he revised X-Factor in 2008 and 2011, with refinements on the idea. The revisions seemed a bit confusing to me.

Back to thread topic: Ideal hip action on backswing varies depending on what swing method people use.

  • Classic swing: Rotate hips with shoulder turn on backswing, and then fire hips to start downswing.
  • X-Factor swing: Minimal hip turn on the backswing - idea is to rotate shoulders but keep lower body quiet on the backswing.

Can any teaching pros explain the latest views of the X-Factor swing?

Recent articles say it increases accuracy of swing and power of swing, but also puts more strain on the back and is contributing to injuries in several over-age-30 tour pros).

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I'm not that agile, kind of like Frankenstein trying to golf, so I use my legs, roll my feet, bump the knees forward, like the old guys, I just can't do the quiet legs thing, maybe someday I hope because chances are that action is going to cost me back troubles.

I try to fire my right hip towards third base as if I were standing on a baseball field in the batters box, but I also try to get my belt buckle up facing the target, it all starts with the legs though, the hips and torso basically just follow their lead.

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I'm not that agile, kind of like Frankenstein trying to golf, so I use my legs, roll my feet, bump the knees forward, like the old guys, I just can't do the quiet legs thing, maybe someday I hope because chances are that action is going to cost me back troubles.

Yes... sports physiologists and several mid-career tour pros agree with you on the back trouble risk.

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The ability to rotate properly into the downswing is dependent on a few different things:

- Flexibility
- Swing Sequence
- Swing Technique

It goes without saying that if you aren't very flexible and don't create a nice tight coil on the backswing that it will be difficult for you to automatically unwind into the downswing.

Moving your body parts in the correct kinematic sequence is a necessity because it will be difficult to rotate your body properly for instance, if your arms are outracing your core.

The same goes for technique. If your technique is poor and you are very arms dominated and not using your core and hips properly on the backswing, it will be difficult to get a good body rotation through impact.

I'm going to send 2 drills:

Description: The Kinematic Sequence Drill helps make sure you are firing your body parts in the proper sequence in your golf swing to maximize power.


Summary:

1. In slow motion, practice firing your body parts in the correct order. This means that you should go to the top of your swing and then start down with your hips first. As they start to slow or come to a stop, you should then feel your shoulders fire. As your shoulders then start to slow or come to a stop (this is where they get back to square to your target line), you should then feel your arms, hands and club follow.

2. Practicing the correct kinematic sequence will not only help you build power and acceleration into your swing as you approach the ball, it will also prevent you from getting into bad positions such as over the top of the swing plane or an early release of the club head.

3. Practice the Kinematic Sequence Drill to get your body parts moving in correct order. when your body gets out of whack, especially with a long shafted and low lofted club like a driver, your swing will end up in some pretty poor positions and loss of power and accuracy will result so the Kinematic Sequence Drill can help address this.






The Ba Boom Hip Drill gives you the feel for the perfect combination of a bump and turn with your hips coming into impact. Poor swings will have all turn (spinning open) or all slide/sway. This drill will help you to get your weight to your front foot properly while getting the correct amount of hip rotation for maximum power.

1. Take your set up and place a chair, swing plane pole or golf bag outside your front hip by a couple of inches. Also, make sure it is back enough by the arch of your foot so that you can freely swing your hands and arms through without hitting them. Be sure to set up to the ball as you normally would with a square stance.

2. Next, make some slow practice swings saying the words "ba boom" to yourself in your head. On the "ba" bump into the chair and on the "boom" turn to face it with your stomach.

3. After making several practice swings try hitting some balls saying "ba boom" and feeling yourself bump into the chair. Notice how now you are getting a good transfer onto your front foot before hitting the ball and how you are now using your hip rotation and core to apply power into the hit.


Give these a try and see if they help

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This was a big discussion topic last spring at the St. Louis Golf Expo. Both teaching pros and exercise physiologists commented on this during different presentations, which discussed X-Factor vs. Classic golf swings. X-Factor comes from a Jim McLean article in a 1992 Golf Magazine issue. Basically X-factor is the difference between the upper body and lower body rotation on the backswing: McLean said that the greater the difference, the more power the golfer generated in his swing. Then, he revised X-Factor in 2008 and 2011, with refinements on the idea. The revisions seemed a bit confusing to me. Back to thread topic: Ideal hip action on backswing varies depending on what swing method people use. [LIST] [*] Classic swing: Rotate hips with shoulder turn on backswing, and then fire hips to start downswing. [*] X-Factor swing: Minimal hip turn on the backswing - idea is to rotate shoulders but keep lower body quiet on the backswing. [/LIST] [SIZE=14px][COLOR=800000] Can any teaching pros explain the latest views of the X-Factor swing? [/COLOR][/SIZE] Recent articles say it increases accuracy of swing and power of swing, but also puts more strain on the back and is contributing to injuries in several over-age-30 tour pros).

Do you any further links to x-factor swings vs classic swing. I feel that I like to keep lower body and hips quiet and use my shoulders for my swing However lately I found it easier to open my hips up and initiate the swing with active turning hips When I use method 1 I generally setup sideways to my target so my hips stay square When I use my method 2 I need to stand facing the target during my routine so I can orientate my hips as that is the way I want my hips to finish The feeling I get during my swing is turning on my right hip so my right back pocket tries to "turn to face the target". I never really get that big of a turn but that's the feeling I try to get

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Back to thread topic: Ideal hip action on backswing varies depending on what swing method people use.

Classic swing: Rotate hips with shoulder turn on backswing, and then fire hips to start downswing.

X-Factor swing: Minimal hip turn on the backswing - idea is to rotate shoulders but keep lower body quiet on the backswing.

Can any teaching pros explain the latest views of the X-Factor swing?

Recent articles say it increases accuracy of swing and power of swing, but also puts more strain on the back and is contributing to injuries in several over-age-30 tour pros).

According to Jim McLean he wants to see the hips turned 45-60 degrees. Those aren't very "restrictive" numbers. Classic swingers didn't turn their hips anymore than that. All the X-Factor stuff really does is identify that there is a difference between the shoulder and hip turn, it's just the way the human anatomy is set-up. Basically if you want a bigger turn, put in the pieces that allow you to turn your hips more.

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