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About Dewdman42

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  • Birthday 11/30/1964

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  • Your Location Park City, UT

Your Golf Game

  • Handicap Index 15.0
  • Handedness Righty
  1. Now that OOB golf is basically going away, which online scoring and stats sites do you like the best, preferably free ones.  Including iphone data entry. What i loved about oob golf was that as I was playing a round it would kind of predict on the iphone how my score was going to end up, as I played.  I doubt anything else does that now, but anyway I need to find a new solution for entering scores and basic stats into iphone and tracking it over time on the computer in some way.  Seems like there are a lot of alternatives right now, its a bit overwhelming to consider them all...just wondering if anyone else has already done that and reached any conclusions.
  2. Titleist AP2

    I just go the 712's.  Absolutely LOVE them.
  3. Tiger Wants to Ban the Long Putter

    ban it. Golf clubs are designed to be held in the hands and swung.  The problem isn't the length, its the act of using the body to anchor it.  That goes against the spirit of golfing, which is taking a stick and swinging it in your hands. What if someone came up with some new fangled kind of iron which could somehow be connected to your body in a way to eliminate casting?  Would we tolerate that?  I don't think so, not in a million years.  Being a good golfer is a huge part about mastering control over your hands.  If someone is able to bypass this issue by anchoring the club or some such thing, then they are essentially kind of cheating the spirit of the game. Anyone using a belly putter knows they are doing it because they thought they could solve some problem in their putting by using this gimmick.  It never should have been tolerated to begin with. ban it, keep everyone on the same playing field.
  4. oobgolf's iphone app is very well designed.  You can configure which stats you want to track to keep the entry screen compact and un cluttered.  If you make par, you just tap the score button to accept par, or hit +/- for bogie or birdie, etc.  Takes one or two taps to enter the score basically.  All of the stats have sensible GUI controls to make them very fast to enter.  It takes only a few taps to enter all my stats that I am tracking, while walking/riding to the next hole. I track also Playable drive, fairway it(left, right, hit miss), putts, 1st putt distance, approach(left, right, long, short, hit miss), chips, up/down (yes,no), sand saves (yes, no).  Some of those I don't have to enter every hole.  The hole thing takes anywhere from 5-10 taps to enter. From that, They generate a lot of interesting stats such as GIR, etc... I used to use GolfShots, but ever since I got a laser I've given up on GPS, it takes too long. One very interesting feature of the iphone app is that as you play the round, it puts a "projected score" at the top, based on how you're playing so far. Then you can go to their website and see all kinds of cool graphs and charts for different stats over time.
  5. iPing putting app

    I just tried this app for 15 sessions or so and settled into a Phdcp that is floating up and down between 2.5 to 3.5.  I consider that pretty good, especially compared to the pros.  Ha my scores don't reflect that, so I know I need to work on other aspects more, such as green reading, lining up and distance control. I think this is a very valuable training device if used the right way.  I do not think its good to groove in your putt strokes with this device attached, due to the weight.  You should do much much more practice with it detached.  But when you are ready to break down your swing and get into the nitty gritty of what you're doing with your stroke and what that results are, its extremely valuable to have it attached.  I was starting to get pretty good at feeling what I did before looking at the display.  But most importantly, I could do a putt that was outside my desired parameters, get the feedback that it was off, then think about what aspect of my stance or swing I needed to focus on in order to correct it, then take another swing and see/feel the result.  This is extremely invaluable, AS LONG AS, you know the fundamentals and biomechanics that are related to putting so that you can take the results and make proper changes. Once you have worked on that for a while, then go out without the device and try to groove it in for a while without the device, but your awareness of the biomechanics and the results of those biomechanics will increase a lot by working with this device. TEMPO I don't even have to think about tempo,  mine is very consistent 1.8-1.9.  Consistency is all that matters here. IMPACT ANGLE - my goal, 0 - 1.0 degree range. I could get a feel for what it means to close my putter face down to zero, or actually for me I found around 1.0 degree impact angle to be what I could do most consistently.  But I could also tell that when I was lazy about certain things it was very easy to see higher numbers of impact angle.  If I wasn't using this device I don't think I would have even realized.  But having this device on got me to become much more in tune with what it "feels" like to hit the putter square or closer to square under 1 degree.  After a while I could tell without looking at the display when I over did it and went closed negative impact angle or when I was lazy and hit it open.  I guess for me about 1 out of 10 shots I tend to have an overly open face, maybe 1 out of 50 go overly closed.  But I can feel it now. SWING PATH - my goal - around 4.0 - 5.0 degrees (considered slight arc) The swing path is harder to feel what I did, but the device measurements told me.  But I could usually correct the next swing and I was getting better and better and consistently getting in that 4-5 degree range of swing path.  I became more aware of what I needed to adjust to impact this parameter.  Not as much feel as the impact angle, but somewhat there too. BIOMECHANICS One important aspect to using this device is to never ever under any circumstances try to manipulate the putter with your hands to adjust the results.  You have to think about proper putting mechanics and how those things effect things.  This isn't always obvious.  I discovered a few things while using this device and I believe my awareness of putting mechanics has gone up.  If something is wrong, then try to figure out what aspect of proper putting you're missing.  Fix that thing and try again, see the result.  For me, my follow through is sometimes jammed up.  We talk about making a triangle with our shoulders and arms.  I have a tendency sometimes to maintain that triangle for the backswing and then on the actual stroke the shoulder line blocks.  This causes me to hit too high on the ball for one thing, but I also found this had a dramatic impact on not closing the putter fact at impact.  If I make sure to follow through with my right shoulder, the face hits square and my strike more pure.  The device shows the open face results, then I think to myself, did I block the shoulder again?  Next stroke I correct that and wala, straight putt. Swing path has a lot to do with stance and everyone has their own way they like to do it, there is no right or wrong.  But using the device helped me to figure out that I am most comfortable with the stance and swing of a 4-5 degree slight arc swing.  Once I realized that once and for all I could really think about where my eyes need to be over the ball to make that happen, which part of the putter grip to use, how far away to stand from the ball, etc.   It gave me data points to stop second guessing myself.   I know now I'm a 4-5 slight arc back swinger, so accept that and setup for that. Very useful device.  I really think it can increase awareness. But yes, its important to detach it after a period of nuts and bolts practice, then go out and groove the swing with this heightened awareness.
  6. I love my Scotty Cameron Fastback.  Best putter I've ever owned without question.  I always try out different putters when I go to golf shops, and I just keep coming back to the SC's, especially the fastback.  It has just the right amount of weight and has a comfortable swing , its very nice to look down at with just enough straight lines and curved lines to help me line up right.  Worth every penny.  I've spent far more on drivers over the years then putters, but putting is 50% of the game.
  7. Am I ready for players's irons?

    So is it fair to say that most modern day "blades" are in fact muscle backs, due to the beefing up that manufacturers have made to them in terms of trying to put just a bit more weight under the ball without carving out a cavity?
  8. Am I ready for players's irons?

    and what is the purpose to begin with?
  9. Am I ready for players's irons?

    ahhh.  So a muscleback is a cavity back + the muscle at the sweet spot?
  10. Am I ready for players's irons?

    Please correct me if I'm wrong, but wouldn't a larger offset also change the trajectory?  It seems to me that with less offset, in order to close the face square, while keeping the hands ahead, the club will be de-lofted more then it would be with offset.  I am thinking with offset the hands don't have to be as far ahead, and thus the club is not de-lofted as much, something like that.  Just thinking out loud here.
  11. Am I ready for players's irons?

    Sorry I'm still not getting it.  A blade is pretty much flat on back right?  A cavity back moves the mass away from the sweet spot.  I thought I read that a muscle back actually puts MORE mass behind the sweet spot then a pure blade.  WHY?
  12. Am I ready for players's irons?

    That article discusses blades vs cavity backs, but I could not find anything which explains the purpose of "muscle backs".
  13. Am I ready for players's irons?

    I don't accept the premise that feel is only about sound.  I can DEFINITELY feel something really nice in my hands when I hit mizunos compared to other irons, off the shelf with no fancy shafts.  Does the sound contribute, absolutely but its not only the sound.  The vibration characteristics of the club are what influence the sound and undeniably would effect feel in your hand as well. An awful lot of people have attested for years that forged feel better then cast, there is no point in debating how or why they feel better, but countless people seem to feel they do.  I suspect that the Miuras feel awesome to Danattherock because he never hit forged irons before. Some of the arrogant comments from some of the folks on this thread are astounding.  Suggesting that high handicappers should find a new hobby is utter arrogance.  I'm dissapointed to see that kind of suggestion here.  Golf is for anyone and everyone that enjoys to wack the ball around the course, including ultra high handicappers.  And ultra high handicappers can use any clubs they bloody well please for any reason they prefer.
  14. Am I ready for players's irons?

    Another question, from a results perspective, what is the difference between a blade and muscle back?  Obviously the cavity back widens the sweet spot.  What does adding the mass behind the sweet spot do, compared to a simple blade? Also, can someone describe to me what is the iron offset exactly and how does that effect performance. thanks