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How did you get to a single digit handicap? - Page 10

post #163 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

The point I am trying to make is that S**T happens a lot, and the courses are made to have challenges that make it hard.
 

 

I went from 17 to 12 handicap in one month about 4 months ago.  I had visions of becoming a single handicap golfer.   Then S**T happened and I sprained my back while doing a little yard work.  My handicap is back up 16 and now I have a vision of being stuck at playing bogey golf for the rest of my life.   I am trying to go back to what I was doing right when my handicap went down to 12.  Tragically, I don't remember what it was.  c4_mad.gifd1_bigcry.gifz6_surrender.gif

post #164 of 270

I was playing at about a 12-15 handicap before going to see Erik in PA. For the past month, i've been playing at a 6-7 handicap. Cut my handicap in half since around Memorial Day weekend, so what 3 months. 

 

For me, people can beat golf balls to death, unless they know what there doing, its pointless. They might get lucky, might find a needle in a hay stack, that's rare. Or you get the guy who is athletic and can swing a golf club close to a single digit handicap with in a few months. There bodies are conditioned to know an athletic movement. My cousin is like this, played basketball his hole life, now is a coach, and play golf now. It took him less than a year to break 90. He hardly had any lessons. Just natural athletic ability.

 

But if you want to get good,

 

1) KNOW THE INFORMATION

2) Know how to implement the information

 

really there is a lot of information on this website, its pretty simple. 5 key's, all it takes. Here's the thing, count the number of times a new person comes on this website looking for a quick fix. Its not a quick fix, you have to be really good just to get a quick fix, because for a really good golfer its usually one thing that throws something off. For most amateurs, its about 5 things ;)

 

Basically what happen for me, Erik gave me the knowledge and the tools to become better, i saw a drastic increase in my score.

post #165 of 270

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnybegood View Post

I don't believe I am "the exception". If I walked up to someone (who knew nothing of golf) and said, you get given 14 clubs, and all you need to do is put the ball in the hole, for which there is a recommended score you should achieve it sounds simple. The ball does not move, and you can take (up to a certain extent) as much time as you want to see what shot you want to hit.

 

Yes, I am shooting under par, and yes I cal my putting a huge weakness. My last round under par, I hit 16 of 18 GIR and had 7 one putts (5 birdies), 4 3 putts and the rest two putts which left me One under. So 16 of 18 GIR and 34 putts; that seems like a weakness to me?

My last round at a course I'd never played, shot 3 over but had 5 three putts and 35 putts for the round, again this seems like a weakness?

 

In regards to "weekend warriors", you'll find a lot will drop there handicaps if they look at the game as a whole and realize how simplistic and easy it should be. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnybegood View Post

What's not to believe? Golf, like most individual sports is simple in theory. In practice, yes, they may be hard but only the user is to blame as they put the ball where they are now playing it from.

 

I may be in the minority, but a lot of people (I believe) could improve if they took a more simplistic approach to the game, instead of turning it into this complex algorithm that only a select few can master.

 

It sounds like you are basically saying that golf is easy for most people and that people who don't play very often are single digit caps - as long as they think the game is simple.  That is just not true. I'd contend that actually the opposite is true.  That people who have never played before go out and try to hit the ball with the stick and expect things to go pretty well. But what they find instead is that they hit it into the woods or the water - or they duff it or skull it - or miss the ball altogether.  

 

Beginners wiff!  And they don't wiff because they are attempting a complex algorithm.  They wouldn't know what algorithm to try.  And neither do I for that matter.  They wiff because they aren't doing it right.  Same reason people shoot over par.  Same reason people are 10 caps and 20 caps and 30 caps.  

 

Maybe you live in a rare place where golf just comes easy to people and maybe you really are a 2 without practice who greens 16 per round.  Not sure.  What I am sure about is that this isn't common in golf and you would be the exception.  Most once a month golfers are double digit caps.  People, regardless of preconceived notions of how easy or hard golf is, have trouble hitting that ball hundreds of yards on a consistent basis without hitting into trouble.

 

If you were to really apply that scenario you presented where you took people who knew nothing of golf and gave them the 14 clubs and such - and you got 100 random people to go play - I'd bet right at 0 or 1 would break 100.  It is odd you didn't really finish the thought as to how you thought they would do - but it seemed the implication was that since they weren't tainted with the algorithm that they would probably break 80 or so.

post #166 of 270
Yardage per club, GIR and lag putting. Figure those 3 factors out and youll be there in no time guaranteed.
post #167 of 270

I can break down your list better

 

1) Contact

2) Contact

3) make putts

post #168 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meltdwhiskey View Post


Maybe you live in a rare place where golf just comes easy to people and maybe you really are a 2 without practice who greens 16 per round.  Not sure.  What I am sure about is that this isn't common in golf and you would be the exception.  Most once a month golfers are double digit caps.  People, regardless of preconceived notions of how easy or hard golf is, have trouble hitting that ball hundreds of yards on a consistent basis without hitting into troublso.

He must come from scandanavia, everything comes easy to those ****ers.
post #169 of 270
Basically you wont be putting if youre not on the green...you wont be on the green unless you know the yardage of your irons and your ball striking ability. Forget about shaping shots just get a smooth consistent swing that works for you. Focus on the shots that work for you and have consistency with it.
post #170 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post

I was playing at about a 12-15 handicap before going to see Erik in PA. For the past month, i've been playing at a 6-7 handicap. Cut my handicap in half since around Memorial Day weekend, so what 3 months. 

But if you want to be good,

1) KNOW THE INFORMATION
2) Know how to implement the information

Basically what happen for me, Erik gave me the knowledge and the tools to become better, i saw a drastic increase in my score.
How long did it take for you to develop a good swing to get to a 12 HC? I think it is possible to go from a 12 to a 6 very quickly with proper information.

The issue is you have to have the consistent ball striking to be able to take advantage of the information from Erik gave you, which you did as a 12 HC.

Johnnybegood also had that training from youth, so he was able to get to a 2.

These are believable, but getting from a complete newbie to a single digit inside of a year is difficult for me to believe.

We should define a single digit. If you can strike the ball onto the green in two shots most of the time, that is a single digit.

When I started, I basically could roll the ball consistently. So for two years, I played the local public courses and could get away with that. My HC was hovering within two strokes of where I am today. However, when I played a "real" course, my score was around 116 to 120. Today, I score in the mid to high 90s.

The difference is that I hit the ball where I need it to go. So, I feel that I am on the cusp of playing better. Once I get more confidence in the distances of my clubs, things should come together. That will take lots of pounding balls in the sweet spot with lots of impact tape.

Most people find it difficult to hit the ball consistently the same distance. This is the essence of golf.

If you are not fortunate enough to be one of the 1% of the natural athletes (CA is an exception with a little under 2%), you need to hit a lot of balls just to get to the point where you can hit that sweet spot 90% of the time on every club for the distance control you need to get to a 12HC.

Once you have this, I can see you getting down to the single digits with good instruction.
post #171 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post


How long did it take for you to develop a good swing to get to a 12 HC? I think it is possible to go from a 12 to a 6 very quickly with proper information.

The issue is you have to have the consistent ball striking to be able to take advantage of the information from Erik gave you, which you did as a 12 HC.

Johnnybegood also had that training from youth, so he was able to get to a 2.

These are believable, but getting from a complete newbie to a single digit inside of a year is difficult for me to believe.

We should define a single digit. If you can strike the ball onto the green in two shots most of the time, that is a single digit.

When I started, I basically could roll the ball consistently. So for two years, I played the local public courses and could get away with that. My HC was hovering within two strokes of where I am today. However, when I played a "real" course, my score was around 116 to 120. Today, I score in the mid to high 90s.

The difference is that I hit the ball where I need it to go. So, I feel that I am on the cusp of playing better. Once I get more confidence in the distances of my clubs, things should come together. That will take lots of pounding balls in the sweet spot with lots of impact tape.

Most people find it difficult to hit the ball consistently the same distance. This is the essence of golf.

If you are not fortunate enough to be one of the 1% of the natural athletes (CA is an exception with a little under 2%), you need to hit a lot of balls just to get to the point where you can hit that sweet spot 90% of the time on every club for the distance control you need to get to a 12HC.

Once you have this, I can see you getting down to the single digits with good instruction.

 

Highschool, i played a good amount of golf, and practiced a few times, i was about a i went from shooting in the 50's to the upper 40's for 9 holes. In college, i hardly played golf, just maybe 4-5 times a year. Shot about the same, mid to upper 40's. Then once i started my job out of college and joined a golf league. I got more playing time. I practiced maybe a handful of times a year, took maybe 1-2 lessons a year. I dropped to a 10-12. Then i took Erik's lesson and dropped to a 6-7 handicap.

 

I will say this though, if you take someone who just started, give them a few lessons with Erik, get them practicing right, they could drop really fast. Cause, they don't have bad faults ingrained yet. Any body can take good instruction, to think they have to beat balls to get some sort of contact is crap in my opinion. If you get them the first three keys, they will hit the ball better and there scores will drop. The reason is, your body will adjust and naturally control were you want the ball to go. Erik made the point when you practice, if you exagerate things your going to hit shit shots, shanks, what ever. But he trust himself to get club to ball when he's on the course. That's the adjustment. I see it in my game. You'd be shocked at what the mind can tell the body to do once you give it a baseline to work from. The problem most people rather beat balls with there baseline fluctuating from day to day.

post #172 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

The issue is you have to have the consistent ball striking to be able to take advantage of the information from Erik gave you, which you did as a 12 HC.

 

I disagree with that. Not in saevel's case specifically, but just in general. And not in "consistency" in the literal sense, either. A 12 handicapper is not a great ballstriker. I have success with making 18s into 12s just as I do making 12s into 6s (though the latter is more difficult, given the way things get more difficult as you get lower and lower and lower in handicap). I don't think saevel would tell you he was a "good" or "consistent" ball striker as a 12. Fat shots, thin shots, and some good shots were all in there. He "consistently" made virtually identical swings, but little things would lead to problems.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

These are believable, but getting from a complete newbie to a single digit inside of a year is difficult for me to believe.

 

Greg Norman did it, no? :)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

We should define a single digit. If you can strike the ball onto the green in two shots most of the time, that is a single digit.

 

Huh? Wouldn't that mean 10 GIR per round? If you get 10 GIR per round you're doing pretty darn well, and you're likely not a 9 handicap.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

The difference is that I hit the ball where I need it to go. So, I feel that I am on the cusp of playing better. Once I get more confidence in the distances of my clubs, things should come together. That will take lots of pounding balls in the sweet spot with lots of impact tape.

Once you have this, I can see you getting down to the single digits with good instruction.

 

I suggest you get good lessons now. Why are you waiting? There's no advantage (except saving money, which matters) - and plenty of disadvantages - to not getting good lessons as soon in your process as possible. Less habits to un-train/re-train, etc.

 

I had a guy that shot between 85 and 95 come back to me after two lessons and tell me that his buddies were all pissed. His worst score in the preceding two weeks? 78. He was a 15 handicap. He's now a 5.

 

Go work with Mike. You really don't have many reasons not to. :)

 

(Back to the topic now: the best way to get to a single digit handicap is to take good lessons, combine it with whatever natural skill you've got, and work at it as much as possible. That's it. Some can leave out one of those factors, but it'll be more difficult, more unlikely, and will take longer. And nobody can really leave out two of them.)

post #173 of 270
Quote:

Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 

I don't think saevel would tell you he was a "good" or "consistent" ball striker as a 12. Fat shots, thin shots, and some good shots were all in there. He "consistently" made virtually identical swings, but little things would lead to problems.

 

 

Nope not at all, once you realize what good contact is, i wasn't nearly as good as i am now.

 

Here's how i take it, my old swing. Wedge shots would be, anywere on the same half of the green the pin is at, just on the green. i just wanted a putt for birdie, but pars were awesome. 

New swing, if i have a wedge in my hand, i am looking at inside 20' every time, i am gunning for birdie.  That's the confidence and the expectation i look at.

 

 

Quote:
(Back to the topic now: the best way to get to a single digit handicap is to take good lessons, combine it with whatever natural skill you've got, and work at it as much as possible. That's it. Some can leave out one of those factors, but it'll be more difficult, more unlikely, and will take longer. And nobody can really leave out two of them.)

 

Look at professional golfers. Back in the day golfers would study there idols. Take bits of pieces from someone else. There pears were there starting points. Bobby Jones would stand around good golfers at the local golf club and try to mimic there swing. It took trial and error. That's why pro golfers back then were rare, because it took such labor to do it. Look today, there are much more good golfers now on many levels. Heck they started those mini-tours, just for a place for these people to compete. Even Tiger has mentioned the growth of the younger golfers is accelerating at a crazy pace. They all have video cameras and golf instructors, and the level of play they can play at, at such a young age is astounding. But its Knowledge, and implementation, and repetitions.

post #174 of 270

to the op:  I have chronicled my journey to single digits in a long thread/blog under instruction/playing tips.  I played golf for the first time on June 2, 2012.  It has been less than 15 months and I am at an 8.5 handicap now.  No lessons, just a lot of learning, practice, and rounds of golf.  I started this season (March 2013) at 15.5 handicap and less than 4 months got it to single digits.  Read the thread for the details but the most important thing that got me there was increasing GIR per round.  The improved ball striking was the most important thing and what I have focused on mainly all year so far. 

 

I realized the impact that GIR had on a score and went to work.  There is a formula out there that says your score should be as a general rule of thumb: 95 - (GIR x 2) = your score for the round.  It is actually pretty accurate for the most part (assuming that you are an average putter at the very least). 

post #175 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

I suggest you get good lessons now. Why are you waiting? There's no advantage (except saving money, which matters) - and plenty of disadvantages - to not getting good lessons as soon in your process as possible. Less habits to un-train/re-train, etc.

 

I had a guy that shot between 85 and 95 come back to me after two lessons and tell me that his buddies were all pissed. His worst score in the preceding two weeks? 78. He was a 15 handicap. He's now a 5.

 

Go work with Mike. You really don't have many reasons not to. :)

 

(Back to the topic now: the best way to get to a single digit handicap is to take good lessons, combine it with whatever natural skill you've got, and work at it as much as possible. That's it. Some can leave out one of those factors, but it'll be more difficult, more unlikely, and will take longer. And nobody can really leave out two of them.)

 

Sure, the best way to get to a single digit handicap is to take good lessons.

 

I started taking weekly lessons over the summer, and have just started to see improvements in the last 3 months. My current coach has gotten me from a 40-ish down to a 20-ish (85 to 96 depending upon the course). The biggest difference is my ball striking and putting have improved.

 

If you can turn an 85 to 95 guy with two lessons into a 5? I'm in, even if it takes me four (or more) lessons. Mike is a bit far for me to see, but I wouldn't mind if there is a way to overcome the distance to San Diego. I would consider it a minor miracle if you can get me to a single digit HC. I'll PM you and mike.

post #176 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjwestner View Post

 

I realized the impact that GIR had on a score and went to work.  There is a formula out there that says your score should be as a general rule of thumb: 95 - (GIR x 2) = your score for the round.  It is actually pretty accurate for the most part (assuming that you are an average putter at the very least)

 

That equation is nice, its simplified, but i have learned that its not that accurate, since its probably has an error or 2-3 strokes per 9, just because were talking about golf. GIR is not the end all to be all. I've played one nine better hitting 2 greens than i have hitting 7 greens. Its called short game went crazy hot.

 

But when it comes to golf, its proximity, its all about percentages, you got some outliers, like chipping in. But when it comes down to it, your best chance of scoring is putting the ball closer to the hole. What's easier 10' putt or 40' putt. I've seen people 3 putt from 40' before. I've seen people 3 putt from 10 feet before, but its a lot less likely.

 

to me the equation assumes to much.

 

Like we said, the best say to lower the score is Knowledge, how to implement that knowledge, and repetitions. Its basically how you learn everything in life. How fast and how well you do it, is based on the quality of all three aspects. Hence Erik's threads on Slow methodical practicing, exagerating the movements, also his posts on how much time to spend on each part of the game. Its all there for people, just have to make a plan and do it. There's hardly an easy fix for anything, and search for it is an act in futility.

post #177 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 

(Back to the topic now: the best way to get to a single digit handicap is to take good lessons, combine it with whatever natural skill you've got, and work at it as much as possible. That's it. Some can leave out one of those factors, but it'll be more difficult, more unlikely, and will take longer. And nobody can really leave out two of them.)

 

One regret I have is that I don't have the finances to take lessons, due to circumstances and time and such. Maybe I can in the future, so really I have improved through pure determination to succeed. Arming myself with knowledge and sorting through things. I'm with you that this is taking longer than if I had someone to observe my swing. I really think I would be shooting lower if I was coached.

 

I'm still convinced I can shoot to a single digit handicap as a self taught golfer for me it's a few keys areas physical as in training the body, technical the mechanics of my swing, course strategy smart club choices, and mental approach to every shot.

 

I'm working through this all by myself but thankfully the internet and books, and this forum are very helpful. The key part of this is taking information and implementing it into the swing. That's the part that decides whether you improve or not. I know there are other factors involved but getting the mind and body together and a lot of golfers could be single digit handicaps.

post #178 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post

I can break down your list better

 

1) Contact

2) Contact

3) make putts

 

Based on my experience, I'd say this is correct.

 

Both of the above has vastly improved for me in the last 2 months and my scores have gone from high 90's down to even mid 80's.

 

24 handicap for a whole year and expecting to be a ~16 handicapper soon

post #179 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brakkus View Post

 

One regret I have is that I don't have the finances to take lessons, due to circumstances and time and such. Maybe I can in the future, so really I have improved through pure determination to succeed. Arming myself with knowledge and sorting through things. I'm with you that this is taking longer than if I had someone to observe my swing. I really think I would be shooting lower if I was coached.

 

I'm still convinced I can shoot to a single digit handicap as a self taught golfer for me it's a few keys areas physical as in training the body, technical the mechanics of my swing, course strategy smart club choices, and mental approach to every shot.

 

I'm working through this all by myself but thankfully the internet and books, and this forum are very helpful. The key part of this is taking information and implementing it into the swing. That's the part that decides whether you improve or not. I know there are other factors involved but getting the mind and body together and a lot of golfers could be single digit handicaps.

 

Compared to playing golf and buying buckets, lessons don't really cost that much.  You might want to re think it.  Lessons are really valuable as you often don't realize what you are doing wrong - and it makes the subsequent rounds much more enjoyable because you play better.  I've bought lessons for $60/hr and some for $200 for a 5 pack of half hours.  In my experience, it takes quite a while to practice what they can tell you in a half hour.  It's not like you need to go once a week or something.

post #180 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meltdwhiskey View Post

 

Compared to playing golf and buying buckets, lessons don't really cost that much.  You might want to re think it.  Lessons are really valuable as you often don't realize what you are doing wrong - and it makes the subsequent rounds much more enjoyable because you play better.  I've bought lessons for $60/hr and some for $200 for a 5 pack of half hours.  In my experience, it takes quite a while to practice what they can tell you in a half hour.  It's not like you need to go once a week or something.

 

I agree, Erik finally was able to convince me to go up to Erie for a lesson, never regretted it one bit. He's a great instructor, and they are not expensive comparing them to other instructors. There facility is amazing, i want that giant putting green in my apartment. If i could take out all the carpet and put in the putting green i would be a happy man ;)

 

think about this, average price for a large bucket of balls is what, 8-10 dollars a bucket. Sometimes you can get 5 dollars. 6 buckets of golf balls, and useless practice doesn't even compare to the value of a quality instruction at 60 dollars for 1 hour.

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